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Agenda and
Business Paper

 


Ordinary Meeting of Council

 

 

 

To be held on
Monday 26 July 2021

at 6.00pm

 

 

 

Civic Centre cnr Baylis and Morrow Streets,
Wagga Wagga NSW 2650 (PO Box 20)
P 1300 292 442
P council@wagga.nsw.gov.au


wagga.nsw.gov.au


NOTICE OF MEETING

 

In pursuance of the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993 and the Regulations there under, notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Meeting of the Council of the City of Wagga Wagga will be held in the Council Chamber, Civic Centre, Corner Baylis and Morrow Streets, Wagga Wagga, on Monday 26 July 2021 at 6.00pm.

 

Council live streams video and audio of Council meetings. Members of the public are advised that their voice and/or image may form part of the webcast.

 

 

2Peter_500px

 

Mr Peter Thompson

General Manager

 


WAGGA WAGGA CITY COUNCILLORS

 

 

Councillor G

Mayor

Councillor Greg

Conkey OAM

Councillor D

Deputy Mayor

Councillor Dallas Tout

Councillor Y

Councillor Yvonne Braid

Councillor D

Councillor Dan Hayes

Councillor V

Councillor Vanessa Keenan

Councillor R

Councillor Rod Kendall

Councillor T

Councillor Tim Koschel

Councillor K

Councillor Kerry Pascoe

 

 

QUORUM

The quorum for a meeting of the Council is a majority of the Councillors of the Council who hold office for the time being who are eligible to vote at the meeting.


COUNCIL MEETING ROOM

 


Reports submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council to be held on Monday 26 July 2021.

Ordinary Meeting of Council AGENDA AND BUSINESS PAPER

Monday 26 July 2021

ORDER OF BUSINESS:

CLAUSE               PRECIS                            PAGE

PRAYER                                                                                                 3

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY                                                    3

APOLOGIES                                                                                           3

Confirmation of Minutes

CM-1           Ordinary Council Meeting - 12 July 2020                                                                          3

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST                                                              3

Motions Of Which Due Notice Has Been Given

NOM-1        NOTICE OF MOTION - TURVEY PARK AND MT AUSTIN PEDESTRIAN SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS                                               4

Councillor Report

CR-1           NATIONAL GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE AUSTRALIAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION                                                  6

Reports from Staff

RP-1           Planning Proposal LEP20/0010 - Increase to Wagga Wagga LEP Height of Buildings standard at 63-65 Johnston Street                                       15

RP-2           Planning Proposal LEP20/0007 - Land zoning boundary adjustments to lands nearby Pine Gully Road, Avocet Drive and Rainbow Drive, Estella        28

RP-3           Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Rural Halls                                                             41

RP-4           Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Arts, Culture and Creative Industries         44

RP-5           Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Recreational Facilities                          49

RP-6           Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Events                                                          54

RP-7           Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Youth Led Initiatives                                             59

RP-8           Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Natural Environment                              64

RP-9           Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Local Heritage                                                       68

RP-10          Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Neighbourhood and Rural Villages   73

RP-11          Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Small Business                                                       78

RP-12          RRL DEED OF AGREEMENT EXPIRY DATE AND WAGGA WAGGA CITY COUNCIL LIBRARY SERVICE OPTIONS                         83

RP-13          Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Community Programs and Projects    94

RP-14          APPLICATIONS FOR SUBSIDY FOR WASTE DISPOSAL FOR CHARITY OGANISATIONS    99

RP-15          COMMUNITY@WORK FUND - OUTCOME OF GRANT FUNDING SUBMISSIONS                  101

RP-16          2020/21 WORKS IN PROGRESS AND REVOTES, 2021/22 BUDGET VARIATIONS AND 30 JUNE 2021 INVESTMENT REPORT           106

RP-17          SECTION 356 REQUESTS FOR FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE                                                128

RP-18          Proposed New and Amended Fees and Charges for 2021/22                                136

RP-19          IMPLEMENTATION OF INLAND WATER SAFETY MANAGEMENT PLAN UPDATE       139

RP-20          Funding Offer - Renewal of Wagga Wagga Kart Club Facility                    197

RP-21          PROPOSED ALL ABILITIES WHARF AT LAKE ALBERT                                                        201

RP-22          Proposed Extension of Area Licensed to Shaw Street Children's Centre Inc.                                                                      207

RP-23          PETITION - WAGGA WAGGA RAIL TRAIL     212

RP-24          2021 CARETAKER PERIOD                           224

RP-25          RESOLUTIONS AND NOTICES OF MOTIONS REGISTERS                                                   226

RP-26          RESPONSE TO QUESTIONS/BUSINESS WITH NOTICE                                                         228

RP-27          GENERAL MANAGER'S REPORT - RIVERINA REGIONAL LIBRARY ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING - 31 MARCH 2021                          230

Committee Minutes

M-1             RIVERINA REGIONAL LIBRARY ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING - 31 MARCH 2021     234

M-2             TRAFFIC COMMITTEE - ELECTRONIC MEETING - 13 MAY 2021 & 8 July 2021       246   

QUESTIONS/BUSINESS WITH NOTICE                                               256

Confidential Reports

CONF-1       RFQ2021-542 SUPPLY, SUPPLY & LAY DENSELY GRADED ASPHALT                      257

CONF-2       RFQ2021-552 ATP II LAKE ALBERT LINKS ASPHALT CONCRETE                                   258

CONF-3       RFT2021-24 ATP 1 CONCRETE SECTIONS DESIGN & CONSTRUCT                                259

CONF-4       RFT2021-22GWMC GAS TURBINE AND LEACHATE EVAPORATIVE SYSTEM DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION                                           260

CONF-5       PROPOSED SUB-LICENCE AGREEMENT FOR AIRPORT CAR HIRE DESK 3                         261

CONF-6       PROPOSED ASSIGNMENT OF AIRPORT SUB-LEASES - LIGHT AIRCRAFT PRECINCT HANGAR SITE 17                                          262

CONF-7       PROPOSED SUB-LICENCE AGREEMENT FOR AIRPORT CAR HIRE DESK 4                         263

CONF-8       Funding Proposal for Pomingalarna Stage 2 Works                                          264

CONF-9       PROPERTY ACQUISITION - 54 JOHNSON ST, WAGGA WAGGA                                           265

CONF-10     Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009 - Proposed Fee Waiver                                                                      266

 


 

 

PRAYER

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY

 

 

APOLOGIES

 

 

Confirmation of Minutes

CM-1            Ordinary Council Meeting - 12 July 2020         

Recommendation

That the Minutes of the proceedings of the Ordinary Council Meeting held on 12 July 2021 be confirmed as a true and accurate record.

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

Minutes - 12 July 2021

267

 

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

NOM-1

 

Motions Of Which Due Notice Has Been Given

NOM-1         NOTICE OF MOTION - TURVEY PARK AND MT AUSTIN PEDESTRIAN SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS

Author:        Councillor Dan Hayes

 

 

Summary:

The purpose of this Notice of Motion is to call for a report on improving pedestrian safety in Turvey Park and Mt Austin.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receive a report outlining:

a      any possible pedestrian safety improvements along Mitchelmore Street and Northcott Parade

b      investigate improvements for pedestrian access to the Botanic Gardens facilities along Macleay Street from Urana Street and Hodson Avenue

c      consideration of any improvements to be included in any grant or funding opportunities and additions to future works plans

 

Report

Mitchelmore Street and Northcott Parade have become busy roads, especially during peak times. Oddly though, from the intersection of Fernleigh Road to Leavenworth Drive the ability to safely cross the road is significantly less than parts of the Mitchelmore Street that precede it. Northcott Parade ultimately ends with poor accessibility for pedestrians to cross Northcott Parade safely and easily to access the pedestrian crossing to the school.

 

The intersection at Fernleigh has also increased in traffic as well as the popularity of the shops at the Turvey Tops Shopping Centre and surrounds has led to increased pedestrians, yet the intersection provides significant dangers to cross safely.

 

One of Wagga’s best attractions is the Botanic Gardens, yet pedestrian access is limited. Currently access to the facilities is only available to able bodied people unless you are prepared to share the roads with traffic. It is recognised the roads in the Botanic Gardens are 15kms to provide a safe and possible shared road, but access to them is difficult if not dangerous.

 

We all recognise that as Wagga continues to grow improvements are needed in places where the current infrastructure has been sufficient for decades. Eventually though they become not fit for purpose. By creating plans for these areas of high use and adding them to work plans or as part of grant and funding applications we can ensure their suitability for the decades to come.

Financial Implications

N/A

 

 

Policy and Legislation

Code of Meeting Practice

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Safe and Healthy Community

Objective: We are safe

Outcome: We create safe spaces and places

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

N/A

Internal / External Consultation

N/A

 

 

  


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

RP-1

 

Councillor Report

CR-1            NATIONAL GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE AUSTRALIAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

Author:        The Mayor, Councillor Greg Conkey OAM

                    Councillor Rod Kendall

                    Councillor Dan Hayes

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receive and note the report by the Mayor, Councillor Greg Conkey OAM, Councillor Dan Hayes and Councillor Rod Kendall regarding the 27 National General Assembly of the Australian Local Government Association.

 

Report

The Wagga Wagga City Council was represented by the Mayor, Councillor Greg Conkey OAM, Councillors Dan Hayes and Rod Kendall and the General Manager, Peter Thompson at the 27th National General Assembly of the Australian Local Government Association was held in Canberra from June 20 to 23.

 

Report from The Mayor Councillor Greg Conkey OAM

 

Speakers included the then Deputy Prime Minister, Michael McCormack, the then Minister for Local Government, Mark Coulton, Leader of the Opposition, Anthony Albanese, Shadow Minister for Local Government, Jason Clare, Resilience Commissioner, Shane Fitzsimmons, Coordinator of the National Recovery and Resilience Agency, Shane Stone, Network Ten’s Political Editor, Peter Van Onselen, Prof Mary-Louise McLaws, Prof Gigi Foster, Prof Sanjaya Senanayake, Craig Foster and Prof Tom Calma.

 

Ten’s Political Editor, Peter Can Onselen, spoke about his poor track record in predicting political outcomes which included (in his opening remarks) Michael McCormack retaining his position as Deputy Prime Minister.

 

He went on to predict the conservatives winning the next federal election and believes the next election will be held before the end of this calendar year.

 

Three speakers addressed the conference on the impacts of COVID-19.

 

Prof Mary-Louise McLaws and Prof Sanjaya Senanayake said:

 

·    The COVID war was still very much an issue with the globe now experiencing a third wave;

·    There have been 175m cases of COVID 19 worldwide with 3.8m deaths;

·    The world can expect more strains with the Delta strain 70 to 80 percent more contagious than previous strains;

·    Every time Sydney or Melbourne is locked down the cost is $1b a week;

·    Eighty percent of the population needed to be vaccinated;

·    135 vaccines are currently in trials;

·    25 percent of Australia’s population has received one vaccine, only three percent have received two.

 

Prof Gigi Foster put forward a different viewpoint.

 

The Professor spoke about the huge economic impact on the country (despite there being less than 1000 deaths), the disruptions to children’s education, the mass loneliness and the reductions to general wellbeing.

 

Whilst the Professor said there was a need to protect the most vulnerable and to adopt strict hygiene methods, she argued against mass lockdowns and the closure of borders.

 

The Shadow Minister for Local Government, Jason Clare, said when Labor gets re-elected, he will advocate for the inclusion of a Local Government representative in the National Cabinet and will support the constitutional recognition of local government.

 

The regional director of CyberArk, Thomas Fikentscher, gave a grim picture of the extent of what he described as the Cyber Pandemic.

 

He said there has been a 102% increase in ransomware attacks this year compared to 2020 and highlighted one international company in recent weeks paying more than $14m to hackers to have their data reinstated.

 

He said the average cost of a cyber breach in Australia was $3.3m; there were 59,806 reported cybercrimes in Australia last year; and there has been a 23% increase in government breaches.

 

Mr Fikentscher said it was a question of when, not if, individuals, companies and government bodies were attacked.

 

His top three recommendations for Local Government were:

 

1. assign accountability and make cyber risk management a standing agenda item;

2. run a security assessment; and

3. apply a programmatic approach (Blueprint) and focus on rapid risk mitigation.

 

Report from Councillor Rod Kendall

 

Planning a Prosperous Future

 

Danielle Wood, CEO, Grattan Institute

 

COVID and the Economy

 

·    The recovery is going well with the country containing the economic hit well and illness and deaths.

·    The recovery has been a “V” shape and the forecast is that growth will continue. All governments spent big.

·    Household income increased but consumption decreased resulting in household savings increasing. The prediction is that the savings will be spent as consumer confidence is high.

·    Vaccination hesitancy is 26%. A well targeted campaign will be required to get vaccination rates up.

·    Lockdowns have had a big impact on GDP. Boarder closures have a social and economic effect.

·    The longer we wait to reopen international boarders the more our competitors have a jump on us.

·    Federal government policy continues to support the economy. This is a big shift away from balance budgets to reducing unemployment.

·    The US is also adopting a jump start the economy strategy.

·    This strategy has its critics, overheating the economy is a risk and that would lead to high inflation. But economists generally support the strategy.

·    We will see at least a decade of budget deficits.

·    The size of government has increased, this may be permanent. Debt has significantly increased.

·    Expect more debate on tax cuts.

·    We will know more in a week when the government releases its Intergenerational report.

·    LG remains constrained by rating constraints.

·    Large businesses are open to hybrid work models.

·    Online Medical services and consumption will continue to grow.

 

What does it mean?

·    There will be an attraction for people living up to 200km from their workplace. Areas with public transport links will benefit most.

·    The rise in the circular economy will support local economy growth.

·    There has been little progress on moving to a net zero carbon economy.

·    Green Steel is the biggest opportunity for Australia. Hydrogen energy will be critical.

 

Marlene Karosviskiy

 

Every age counts

·    Minimising the value of older citizens is causing major harm to society, the economy and individuals.

·    The elimination of ageism will result in major social capital gains as a broader community and for individuals.

·    We are living longer and healthier than any previous generation.

·    Romilly Madew, CEO, Infrastructure Australia:

·    Strengthening Social Capital.

·    Infrastructure is fundamental to our wellbeing.

·    We need an adaptive approach to infrastructure planning- place based planning.

 

Hon Scott Morrison, PM

 

The Prime Minister spoke in regard to the pandemic and the response to unexpected events that all LGs continue to play a critically important role. He highlighted the current government programs that assist LG.

 


 

Michael McCormack. Dep PM

 

Thanked all of us in LG for the work we do. Acknowledged the difficulties and challenges that communities have experienced and continue to experience with both natural events and the pandemic.

 

Intimated that some of the COVID responses had caused unnecessary difficulties in regional areas.

 

Spoke to the current program of regional infrastructure improvement programs.

 

The next regional infrastructure fund will include a decentralisation component.

 

Linda Scott, President ALGA

 

Working together for our communities. Linda emphasised the importance of jobs in our local communities. The response to unexpected events and difficulties is a hallmark of Local Government’s abilities to support local communities.

 

The importance of being financially sustainable has been highlighted by the pandemic shutdown, particularly highlighting the importance of the Financial Assistance Grants (FAGs).

 

LG must have a seat at the national cabinet so that the other levels of government understand the local effects of the decisions that are made at that level. The exclusion of LG indicates a lack of fundamental understanding at a federal level of the work undertaken by LG in local communities and the broad range of functions that LG has assumed by necessity.

 

What can we do going forward?

 

“We must advocate for a common set of priorities combined with local issues. FAGs must increase, growing local jobs is critical.”

 

Peter Van Onselen, Political Editor The Australian

 

Peter firstly outlined the difficulty of predicting political outcomes.

 

The future:

 

·    Scott Morrison will win the next election. The government needs to win seats. The result will be narrow. It’s difficult to see how Labor can win the seats it needs to win especially in Qld and Vic.

·    The result will come down to NSW. The Libs have a real chance to pick up 4 to 5 seats. Albanese is not seen as an alternative PM. The timing of the election will be critical. The gut feel is that the end of the year was the original plan. Delaying past the end of the year gives no added favourable issues but does introduce more risk.

·    The big thing the government has in its favour is fund raising.

·    The impact of COVID and the processes. The exclusion of LG from national cabinet speaks to the risks of increased centralisation of power and decision making both at a federal level and at state level. Process is the key to good outcomes; the centralised process increases the risk of poor outcomes.

 

COVID-The long goodbye

 

Prof Mary Louise Mclaws

 

A lot of the world is in the 3rd wave. India is only in its second wave. The vast majority of the world is still at significant risk. Virus evolution continues. We now have 4 variants of concern, none yet of high concern. All variants have crossed continents.

 

Vaccine efficacy is reduced with the variants. Delta is the current dominant variant.

Current quarantine needs improvement. Home quarantine needs to be developed, utilising both antigen and antibody testing. None of us are yet safe enough. We need 80% vaccinated.

 

Prof Gigi Foster

 

Gigi gave an economics realist view point which basically outlined how the COVID response has led to long term damage to the world GDP, individual health outcomes and disrupted education. Gigi is firmly of the belief that future responses should be based around more wholistic advice.

 

Prof Sanjaya Senanayake

 

Vaccine landscape: COVID viruses normally mutate at a slower rate than we are seeing. The big variant of concern is Delta it’s more infectious and more vaccine resistant. The vaccine development has been extremely quick, and this is of significant help to the world. MRN vaccines only take about 6 weeks to create a variation as against 6 months traditionally. All vaccines will have some side effects.

 

We have the Nova vaccine on the horizon, protein based.

 

Hon Jason Clare. Shadow minister for Regional Services, Territories, and LG

 

When the shadow cabinet visited the south coast after last year’s fires, they were particularly struck by the personal toll taken by the people generally but the front-line workers in particular.

 

LG is often forgotten as a first responder body.

 

Not having LG on the national cabinet is a big mistake and will be corrected by Labor if they get the chance.

 

It important that higher levels of Government must work in a true partnership with LG.

 

There is a genuine housing crisis across Australia. Labor will establish a $10B futures housing fund.

 

Resilience and recovery.

 

Shane Fitzsimmons, NSW Resilience and Recovery Agency

 

His new role is both prevention and recovery. We need people who have planned and are prepared. Prevention and mitigation programs will be critical. Betterment is now embedded in recovery.

 

Regional Forum

 

Gabriel Chan

 

Rusted off, Why country Australia is fed up.

 

Politics and the bush: Can localism fix politics?

 

Press gallery conversations do not match the Main Street.

 

Place is very important to people. Local government role is massive in local communities.

 

Political trends:

 

1.   The Rusted Off factor continues.

2.   Agriculture and the environment come together because global markets are moving. How we use our natural capital will be critical.

3.   Food demand and natural capital markets could increase the trend towards scale. Remote land management will pose significant challenges for local communities.

4.   We need a national conversation about how we live on and in the landscape. That means landscape, food and resource management will be at the intersection of politics in the next few decades.

5.   Gabriel Chan’s book “Why you should give a fu+k about farming” will be released in August.

 

Dr Kim Houghton: Regional Awareness

 

Regionalisation is our vision for an Australia that is more balanced more sustainable more equitable and more prosperous.

 

Regional rediscovered: are we ready?

 

Housing: Regions popular again; there is a net inflow to regions. Rentals continue to tighten, where are the investors? There is an immediate need for housing.

 

Planning: Pessimistic state government population forecasts. Distrust of growth with amenity. Please include a growth scenario in your next review! Right time now for regionalisation to take a big step forward.

 

People and jobs: Regions rebounded faster than cities. Most jobs vacancies are high skilled and professionals. Too many regional kids with too low expectations of what the regions offer. 1 in 5 metro residents are considering a regional move. There is an immediate need for workers.

 

Rachael Bacon, Dept of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communication

 

·    6 drivers support regional growth:

·    Building and maintaining strong infrastructure connectivity.

·    Human capital and skills

·    Supporting local industry and commerce.

·    Networks of expertise

·    Building community fabric.

·    Resilience of natural resources.

 

Capacity and resilience of Local Government is integral to regional growth.

 

Rural Health.

 

Prof David Perkins. Centre for Rural Mental Health. and Dr Gabriel O’Kane. Nation Rural Health Alliance.

 

Regional Australians have greater levels of life satisfaction and avoided the majority of COVID impacts.

 

But regional Australians have a greater health burdens, a lessor life expectancy and a $4B rural health deficit.

 

Report from Councillor Dan Hayes

 

The federal local government minister also spoke and said that asking to be on national cabinet needs supports from the premiers.

 

And that chasing the 1% revenue goal from the federal government is hurting ALGA’s advocacy. He incorrectly stated that it would have been less money to local government last financial year if it was implemented.

 

During the “policy sprint” with federal department representatives I asked about grant funding better recognising that estimated costs of projects as compared to going to the market can vary and leave local government holding the bag.

 

While they recognise this discrepancy, their current guidelines do not manage it.

 

It was also discussed about emergency mobile coverage during and after disasters, and that concerns were raised that after the disaster has passed telecommunications remain down and the emergency ones (often satellite related systems) start charging commercial rates which are very expensive.

 

Motion:

 

Motions adopted at the conference included calls to the Federal Government:

 

·    For Local Government to be represented on the National Cabinet;

·     To increase the Financial Assistance Grants to one percent of Commonwealth tax revenue;

·     To provide grant funding to Regional and Rural Councils in advance and not in arrears;

·     To either cease the practice of expecting council co-contribution when applying for Federal Government Grants or allow council’s in-kind contributions to be eligible as the co-contribution from councils;

·     To introduce funding opportunities for regional airports to offset reductions in income due to the COVID-19 pandemic to ensure regional communities are not further disadvantaged;

·     To formally recognise the world was in a state of climate emergency;

·     To establish a National Climate Change Taskforce to enable a whole-of-government approach to climate action;

·     To endorse the Racism Not Welcome campaign as a symbol of Australia’s commitment to multiculturalism, inclusivity and the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination;

·     To ensure local government receives an appropriate and equitable share of Federal arts and cultural funding;

·     To retain and expand the JobKeeper and JobSeeker Programs to support ongoing and recovery efforts to the COVID-19 Pandemic throughout local communities for at least the duration of 2021;

·     To undertake a nationwide education program on cybersecurity, in particular, to help protect vulnerable members of the community against online fraud;

·     To hold a referendum to amend the Constitution to recognise local government as an important, legitimate and essential element in Australia’s system of government;

·     To commit to a net zero carbon emissions by 2050 in line with the 2015 Paris Agreement;

·     To fund ABC transmission black spots;

·     To investigate the failings of the NBN in rural and regional Australia and the exorbitant cost of connection for some businesses and residents;

·     To dedicate funds to increase drug and alcohol treatment and rehabilitation options in rural and regional areas as a matter of priority;

·     To invest further in social and affordable housing;

·     To provide funding support to Councils across Australia for conducting citizenship ceremonies that have become a significant cost burden to local communities for undertaking a role of behalf of the Commonwealth of Australia.

 

Financial Implications

N/A

Policy and Legislation

Payment of Expenses and Provision of facilities to Councillors Policy - POL 025

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Leadership and Collaboration

Objective: We have strong leadership

Outcome: We have leaders that represent us

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

N/A

 

Internal / External Consultation

National General Assembly of the Australian Local Government Association

 

 

  

Reports from Staff

RP-1             Planning Proposal LEP20/0010 - Increase to Wagga Wagga LEP Height of Buildings standard at 63-65 Johnston Street

Author:        Adam Wood 

Director:      Michael Keys

         

 

Summary:

Council has publicly exhibited Planning Proposal LEP20/0010 to amend the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan. The Planning Proposal seeks to increase the Height of Buildings Map as it applies to Lot 1 DP 1028542 at 63-65 Johnston Street. This would allow new or refitted buildings up to 25 metres tall, as opposed to the current 16 metres limit.

 

This report revisits the key considerations in assessing the planning proposal and the findings and outcomes of the public consultation process.

 

Planning Proposal LEP20/0010 is recommended for adoption by Council. It is recommended that Council use its delegation as the local plan making authority to approve the change to the Wagga Wagga LEP and notify the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment to gazette the instrument.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a      note the outcomes of public exhibition of Planning Proposal LEP20/0010 including submissions provided to Council

b      adopt Planning Proposal LEP20/0010 to amend the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010

c      use its delegation as the local plan making authority to approve the legal instrument and notify the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment to gazette the instrument

 

Planning Proposal details

Proposal:

Amendment to the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010 to increase the LEP Height of Buildings standard as it applies to Lot 1 DP 1028542

Applicant:

This is an externally-initiated planning proposal developed by the land owner.

Land Owners

Wollundry Investments Pty Ltd.

Director: Rodney Kendall

Director: Robert Davies

Referrals:

Internal referral during development of proposal.

 

Council staff have previously conducted assessment of a planning proposal submitted by Wollundry Investments Pty Ltd. The planning proposal intends to increase the LEP Height of Buildings Map HOB_003C as it affects Lot 1 DP 1028542. The increase proposed is from the present 16 metre height limit to a new 25 metre height limit.

The proposed change has since received Gateway Determination from the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment and been exhibited to obtain public comment.

The change to Wagga Wagga LEP Map HOB_003C is illustrated as follows.

The subject land is located within the northern portion of the Wagga Wagga CBD, overlooking the Wollundry Lagoon from the northern, opposing side of Johnston Street. This location is approximately 120 metres from Fitzmaurice Street, the northern part of the main street of Wagga Wagga. Occupying a centrally located position within the city, the subject land is nearby to various key locations and amenities and already embedded within the established infrastructural networks of the city.

The planning proposal is limited to only the step increase to allowable building height as detailed above. No change to other provisions including zoning and floor space ratio are proposed. As a result, the interaction of the proposed height limit with these other continuing provisions has formed a key consideration in the assessment of the planning proposal.

Review and restatement of Key Considerations

1.  Public exhibition of the planning proposal

 

Council provided initial endorsement to proceed to Gateway Determination on 22 March 2021 and received Gateway Determination from the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment on 30 April 2021. The planning proposal was publicly exhibited from 14 May 2021 to 25 June 2021. Direct notification and subsequent reminder notices were provided to more than 200 property owners in the surrounds of the subject site to generate awareness of the proposal.

 

A total of six submissions were received during the course of the exhibition period. This is a relatively small response rate in view of the volume of direct notification provided in support of the public exhibition. A summary of the issues presented in submissions, combined with commentary provided in consideration of those issues, is provided within the following section ‘Internal/External Consultation’. In respect of some issues raised, this report provides discussion in this section ‘Review of Key Considerations’ and the following section ‘Risk Management Issues for Council’ which is then referenced in the summary responses to submissions.

 

Of the six submissions, one submission was provided by an agency, that being NSW Crown Lands, which noted the planning proposal but offered no further comment. The remaining five submissions were from private individuals who own property in the surrounding area.

 

Of those remaining five submissions, four registered opposition to or raised concerns with the planning proposal, while one submission expressed support for the planning proposal.

 

2.  The Local strategic Planning Statement, strategic significance of the Wagga Wagga CBD and the upcoming Wagga Wagga CBD Master Plan

 

Council has endorsed the Wagga Wagga Local Strategic Planning Statement. This document provides a pathway to guide the continued growth and development of the city and local government area through to 2040. The Wagga Wagga CBD is one of six key sites to provide the foundation for the future economic activity and growth of the city and region.

 

Principle 9 of the LSPS details aspirations for the future success of the Wagga Wagga CBD area. This section includes discussion and guidance concerning key aspects to accomplishing this success. In this instance, urban design and activation are both central to the merit of the planning proposal.

 

The planning proposal adheres to the LSPS’ direction for the Wagga Wagga CBD, by enabling the development of additional floorspace. This facilitates the placement of additional activities within the confines of the CBD, in close proximity to a variety of other activities occurring in the central city. This aggregation of activities of various kinds, occurring at various times of the day, boosts the overall level of activity occurring within the city. Planning Proposal LEP20/0010 elevates development potential within the B3 Commercial Core zone and will increase the contribution of the subject land to overall activity levels within the city.

 

While the CBD Master Plan is yet to be completed, it is noted that the CBD Master Plan, like all strategic planning directions, must correspond to the overarching direction provided by the LSPS, whilst providing finer-grain detail on how land use strategy will be implemented within the core of the city. The implications of proceeding with the planning proposal ahead of the completion of the CBD Master Plan are discussed at greater length in the following section ‘Risk Management Issues for Council’.

 

3.  Future development potential within proposed and continuing development standards

 

The increase of an additional 9 metres in permissible building height implies future development of two additional storeys to the existing four storeys. The provisions applying to the site would also continue to permit the complete redevelopment of the site. This would likely result in a new structure of up to 6 storeys, designed in accordance with contemporary DCP requirements and the State Environmental Planning Policy No 65 – Design Quality of Residential Apartment Development.

 

A key part of the suitability of the planning proposal is the compatibility of the new building height control with the continuing provisions applying to the site and with pre-existing development within the local precinct. This informs the parameters within which an eventual development may take place and gives an indication about the likely form that development will take. Influential in this regard is the floor space ratio, which is presently 2:1 across the subject land. The implications of this control were detailed in Council’s assessment report.

 

The assessment report found that development up to the new height limit, within the existing building footprint only, would approximate the maximum floor space allowable under the current floor space ratio. Therefore, the new height limit appears well calibrated on this measure, as it allows the existing floor space ratio, to be utilised. If the site were redeveloped with a larger base footprint, the upper floors of that structure would need to be reduced from existing to meet the confines of the floor space ratio requirement.

 

4.  Site consideration in precinct context and heritage considerations

 

Assessment of the planning proposal explored the impact of additional building height on the adjoining area and view scapes within the Johnston Street area and surrounds. While the increase to building height will be visible from the surrounds, the change is incremental to the development already existing in the area. To the east and south, commercial buildings and tree canopy associated with Wollundry Lagoon largely obscure the subject site unless in close proximity to the site. From the west, additional height will be more readily visible. Despite this, the subject site is setback into the subject city block from Trail Street to the west, which reduces the imposition of taller development upon streetscapes to the west.

 

The B3 Commercial Core zone currently permits shop-top housing where residences may be located above ground floor commercial floorspace. Further, Council intends to develop a CBD Master Plan. It is conceivable that this will open opportunities for additional residential development in high density, inner city contexts. The serviced apartment development foreshadowed by the planning proposal is not entirely dissimilar to development for other, more permanent lodgings. Council’s assessment report provided commentary against the SEPP 65 Principles for higher density residential design. It finds that the new height limit provides the opportunity for future development to perform well against the design principles and deliver high-quality development outcomes to the site.

 

The site is within the Wagga Wagga Heritage Conservation Area, but the significance of features in the immediate vicinity of the subject site varies. The subject site itself does not greatly contribute to heritage values, but a development that is not of significance itself may successfully coexist within a heritage area. The site is visible from some parts of two notable locations for the city’s heritage, those being Fitzmaurice Street and the Wollundry Lagoon, an Aboriginal Place.

 

The subject land and surrounds to the north of Wollundry Lagoon have already been extensively developed. To date this has not diminished the significance of the Wollundry Lagoon, which will remain a key location both as an Aboriginal Place and as a public space within Central Wagga Wagga. Future redevelopment will not alter this significance. Concern was raised in the course of consultation that a future development under the new provisions would have a ‘spoiling’ effect upon the significance of the lagoon though excessive scale or shadowing. This will meet with further consideration of these point as a part of any development approval process that arises in future. Measures that are available to ensure a design of appropriate standard for the location are the use of proper building articulation in the design, ensuring adequate setbacks relative to building height and the quality of materials and finishes used. Any development application would be expected to make appropriate use of these measures.

 

Previous consideration of the sites relationship to key heritage locations has been restated below. Fitzmaurice Street is the heritage main street of the city. A direct view line to the subject land can be achieved from the junction of Fitzmaurice Street and Johnston Street. This sightline to the existing development on site is mostly blocked by the office building to the east of the subject land. A future complete redevelopment of the site placing structures nearer to the frontage of Johnston Street would be more apparent from the Fitzmaurice-Johnston intersection, but this would be the case irrespective of any change to the LEP. In the event that this occurs, Council has sufficient ability through the guidance of the Wagga Wagga DCP, SEPP 65 and merit assessment to ensure that a suitable design outcome is obtained. The site is obscured from Fitzmaurice Street by varied two and three storey development along the main street. Viewed from the Fitzmaurice Street bridge spanning the Wollundry Lagoon, the site and existing development are also heavily, though not entirely, obscured by canopy foliage associated with the Wollundry Lagoon parklands.

 

5.  Commercial-to-residential zoning interface

 

Comments were provided during the public exhibition period regarding the relationship of a new development of greater height to the residential areas located to the west of the subject site. The subject site sits within the B3 Commercial Core zone, while lands west of Trail Street are within the R3 Medium Density Residential zone before land zoning transitions to the R1 General Residential zone one city block further west. Of particular interest was the potential for sightlines from the upper portion of a new development to locations on properties in the residential zones to the west and south and how this performed against objectives of WWLEP Clause 4.3 Height of buildings to preserve privacy to other properties. Submissions cited potential sightlines from a taller building on the subject site to private open space of residential properties in the surrounds.

 

To determine whether performance of potential developments in relation to privacy is adequate, it is necessary to establish both the reasonably expected level of performance in regard to the privacy and how far distant another property may be considered to be neighbouring development. To this end, the existing practices of development assessment for Wagga Wagga in relation to overlooking and privacy have been considered, as well as guidance in relation to these issues from the New South Wales planning system.

 

The NSW Apartment Design Guide has been considered as a basis to consider the performance of future development in relation to privacy impact. The Guide would be considered in the development and assessment of shop-top housing or residential flat building development which, as noted in Council’s assessment report, may be pursued on the subject land in future. Many of the design considerations and impacts of serviced apartment development, as foreshadowed by the proponent, are similar to these higher-density permanent residential land uses, Guidelines provide useful benchmarks in consideration of those potential developments.

 

Chapter 3F of the Apartment Design Guide contains guidance for visual privacy.  It makes specific reference to scenarios where there is a transition between a zone permitting higher levels of development and another zone providing for lower intensity of development. Setback distances are an accepted design measure within the Apartment Design Guidelines to protect a reasonable level of vidual privacy to surrounding private open space. In the case of development up to 25 metres tall, habitable rooms and balconies are to be setback 9 metres from other properties, with a further 3 metres setback provided to lower density development. This means that the upper floors of development on the subject land must be setback 12 metres from other properties. In the case of the subject land, the nearest residential land is located 70 metres from the property boundary. Submitted concerns relate to locations more than 100 metres from the subject land. This comparison to the requirements of the Apartment Design Guide suggests that a potential future development on the subject land will be within the bounds of generally accepted design standards.

 

In the context of Wagga Wagga specifically, development assessment of overlooking issues is a merit-based assessment process, with no prescriptive standards offered by Section 9.4.3 of the Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan. The DCP directs the offsetting and orientation of habitable room windows or balconies, the use of screening between sensitive parts of dwellings and the use of setbacks to increase distance between sensitive locations of neighbouring properties. Avoidance of close distance sightlines direct to the interior of properties, particularly habitable rooms, is a key consideration. Sightlines to outdoor locations are given consideration also. By way of example, a balcony overlooking the neighbouring private open space at a close distance may be required to mitigate this effect through setbacks that increase the viewing distance or screening which obscures some viewing angles.

 

Notwithstanding these mitigation options there is acceptance within assessment of developments that the base case for development in populated urban locations is that it is not unreasonable to both see others and be seen by others whilst outdoors on a property. This understanding is self-evident in development featured in all residential zones and areas of Wagga Wagga and is particularly apparent in parts of the city that feature topography. This interpretation has been formed over the course of successive development assessments by Council over an extended period. It has been shaped by the overall level of community expectation expressed in the course of those assessments, and now forms a part of the balance struck between the interests of new development and incumbent occupants in assessing a development. This does not preclude the possibility for property owners to enhance privacy to outdoor locations through improvement within the bounds of their own property. Methods to achieve this can include plantings and landscaping, screening or building orientation if pursuing new development.

 

On the basis of these considerations it is considered that potential development possibilities on the subject land sit significantly within the bounds of consideration in relation to visual privacy. Whilst the concerns of submitters in relation to this issue are noted, this analysis concludes that this is not a reasonable basis upon which to refuse the planning proposal.


 

 

 

6.  Sightlines and shadowing to adjoining property

 

With respect to shadow casting, Council’s assessment considered the likely effects of shadow casting from an additional height increase at the adjoining lot. During the winter solstice, when denial of solar access is of greatest impact, the 9.00am interval diagram provided by the applicant indicates that shadowing already extends across the full rooftop of the structure. To increase the duration of this shadowing to 67 Johnston Street, the width of the structure at 63-65 Johnston Street would need to increase. However, Council’s assessment found that this would not be possible for the upper floors that cast the furthest shadow, as the floor space ratio control would not provide for this outcome.

 

In respect to the privacy concern, the relevant submission raised the prospect that a taller building would potentially allow for line of sight directly through a skylight installed to the accommodation unit at the rear of 67 Johnston Street.

 

The subject land and the adjoining property are within the B3 Commercial Core zoning. The consideration of overlooking in this instance is more relaxed than in a residential zone in view of the objectives of the zone in promoting activity, the nature of the land uses that feature within the zone and the timeframes in which activities are typically carried on in a business area.

 

In view of the zoning of the area, this report considers that the magnitude of change proposed and the potential impacts of future development under the new provisions are not unreasonable. Further, the potential impacts of a taller development are not unable to be moderated. A specific design for 63-65 Johnston Street may be able to substantially avoid overlooking through the placement of windows and balconies. There are also options available to improve privacy to the accommodations at 67 Johnston Street in response to ongoing development of the area, this includes screening or setbacks on future development to minimise overlooking.

Financial implications

The planning proposal has originated externally to the organisation. The planning proposal was identified as a medium complexity amendment to the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010 using the 2020/21 financial year grading schema in effect at the time of submission. Council has levied planning proposal fees totalling $16,000, as per Council’s fees and charges.

 

The planning proposal provides for the intensification of development on the subject land with additional building storeys. This may be achieved through additional development on the site, improvement to the existing development or complete redevelopment of the site. In each instance a development consent would be required to proceed. This has some financial implications for Council into the future.

 

Section 7.11 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and the City of Wagga Wagga’s Section 94 Contributions Plan 2006-2019 enables Council to levy contributions, where anticipated development will or is likely to increase the demand for public facilities. Section 64 of the Local Government Act 1993, Section 306 of the Water Management Act 2000 as well as the City of Wagga Wagga’s Development Servicing Plan for Stormwater 2007 and/or City of Wagga Wagga Development Servicing Plan for Sewerage 2013 enable Council to levy developer charges based on the increased demands that new development will have on sewer and/or stormwater infrastructure. The Section 7.11 and Section 64 contribution applies to any future development consent on the land. This will be applicable to future Development Applications applying to the subject land.

 

Policy and Legislation

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2000

Wagga Wagga Local Strategic Planning Statement

Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010

 

Link to Strategic Plan

The Environment

Objective: We plan for the growth of the city

Outcome: We have sustainable urban development

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

Previous reporting has noted the need for Council to implement measures consistent with the direction of the adopted Wagga Wagga Local Strategic Planning Statement. Failure to do this may result in waning community confidence in the endorsed strategic directions of Council. This report reiterates this risk. In addition, it has been noted within Council’s assessment of the proposal and within community feedback that the Wagga Wagga CBD Master Plan has not yet been completed and that approval of the planning proposal may present the risk of undermining the CBD Master Plan. Council’s addendum to the planning proposal addresses this alternative risk in overview, assessing it as a minimal risk and determining to proceed.

 

An initial consideration is that the Wagga Wagga LSPS is the principal strategic land use planning direction for the city. Any forthcoming CBD Master Plan will need to align outcomes consistent with, and to operate within, the overarching parameters provided by the LSPS. Where a planning proposal aligns with relevant portions of the LSPS, as assessed in this instance, there is a high probability of a broad alignment with the upcoming CBD Master Plan, notwithstanding the noted potential for some variance to the exact details of that Master Plan.

 

Council has its principal strategic planning direction as set by the Wagga Wagga LSPS and is obliged to consider planning matters having regard to this document. The subject planning proposal has been assessed to be consistent with the intent of the Wagga Wagga Local Strategic Planning Statement.  

 

A proponent has recourse to review processes both before and after Gateway Determination in which any refusal of the planning proposal may be tested. As noted, a refusal of the planning proposal may lead to questioning of Council’s commitment to implementing previously-endorsed strategic directions and overall community confidence in Council’s endorsed strategic documents. Council’s affirmative assessment of the planning proposal against the LSPS makes it improbable that refusal would be upheld by a review of the planning proposal. As the LSPS is the key strategic land use planning document or the city, potential non-adherence by Council to the adopted directions of the LSPS is viewed as a critical strategic risk if not supported.

 

Internal / External Consultation

The planning proposal has been subject to public exhibition consistent with the requirements of the Gateway Determination.

 

A total of six submissions were received during the course of the exhibition period. A summary of the issues presented in submissions, combined with commentary provided in consideration of those issues, is provided within the following table. In some instances, this table refers to relevant discussion in the previous sections ‘Review of Key Considerations’ and ‘Risk Management Issues for Council’.

 

The redacted submissions are provided in complete form.

 

a)  General support expressed for the planning proposal

 

Comments / issues

§ Support was put forward for the planning proposal and its potential to demonstrate Wagga Wagga as being a ‘progressive’ city and an attractive alternative for people to live in relative to the larger capital cities.

Planning response / amendments

§ Comments noted

b)  The planning proposal risks compromising outcomes of the CBD Master Plan

 

Comments / issues

§ Concern was expressed that proceeding with the planning proposal to amend the Wagga Wagga LEP ahead of the completion of the CBD Master Plan may undermine or otherwise pre-empt the outcomes of the CBD Master Plan.

Planning response / amendments

§ Refer to discussion provided within previous section ‘Risk Management Issues for Council’.

c)  Shadowing to Wollundry Lagoon parklands and heritage palms may result

 

Comments / issues

§ Concern was expressed that a taller structure located on the site at 63-65 Johnston Street would cause shadowing to the parklands at the surrounds of the Wollundry Lagoon.

Planning response / amendments

§ Reappraisal of materials provided to accompany the planning proposal does not support this as a cause for concern.

Shadow diagrams indicate that, for a structure of an additional two storeys in the same building footprint as that existing, shadow casting will not extend to the opposing side of Johnston Street during the 9.00am, 12.00am and 3.00pm intervals during the winter solstice, with lesser shadow casting evident during the rest of the year.

 

Consideration has also been given to the potential redevelopment of the site with a new, taller building built to the front boundary of the property. Shadow casting from this point, equivalent to that demonstrated by the planning proposal materials, would likely reach as far as the base of the palm trees to the opposing side of Johnston Street at the 9.00am and 3.00pm time intervals during the winter solstice, with shorter shadow casting at the 12.00pm time interval whilst the sun is higher in the sky.

 

In practice, it would be anticipated that an entirely redeveloped site would provide greater performance in relation to shadow casting than that indicated in the shorthand analysis above. This would result from the requirements of the Development Control Plan and other policies, which would include the Apartment Design Guidelines for any shop top housing or other multistorey residential development.

d)  The planning proposal could create a precedent for higher building heights

 

Comments / issues

§ A concern was expressed that the approval of the planning proposal would act as a precedent for the proliferation of taller buildings and height increases more generally.

Planning response / amendments

§ Any planning proposal to amend the Wagga Wagga LEP, including height of buildings standards, is assessed for its performance against the directions of the Wagga Wagga Local Strategic Planning Statement and the merits of the proposal considering the specific circumstances of the subject site.

Any subsequent planning proposal to amend the Wagga Wagga LEP will be required to demonstrate its adherence to the directions of the Wagga Wagga LSPS and the merit of the proposed change in relation to the specific circumstances of that site. Reliance upon a purported precedent will be insufficient and will not satisfy either the Council or State Government assessments of such a planning proposal.

e)  The planning proposal could create pressure upon urban infrastructure

 

Comments / issues

§ Concern was expressed that the more intensive development of sites in the inner parts of Wagga Wagga may result in pressure to infrastructure in these areas.

Planning response / amendments

§ A key consideration of the LSPS is the need for the ongoing development of the city to account for the capacity of and requirement for infrastructure.

The LSPS directs that strategic planning should consolidate within key areas of the city like the Wagga Wagga CBD, making efficient use of the substantial existing infrastructure and service networks that already exist within the city and encouraging shorter journeys between locations that do not require use of vehicles, roads and parking facilities. The planning proposal is consistent with this outcome.

f)   Concerns about sightlines to residential areas to the west

 

Comments / issues

§ Concerns were expressed about the sightlines available from a taller structure towards residential areas to the west of the subject site citing the objective to preserve privacy within Clause 4.3 Height of Buildings.

Planning response / amendments

§ Refer to discussion provided within previous section ‘Review of Key Considerations’ under the subheading ‘Commercial to residential zoning interface’.

g)  Concerns about sightlines and shadowing to adjoining property

 

Comments / issues

§ Concern was registered about the impacts of a taller future structure in relation to the adjoining property, particularly for shadow casting and privacy.

Planning response / amendments

§ Refer to discussion provided within previous section ‘Review of Key Considerations’ under the subheading ‘Sightlines and shadowing to adjoining property’.

h)  Questioning of the style of building at 63-65 Johnston Street in the Heritage Conservation Area

 

Comments / issues

§ Comments from submissions note that the style of building existing at 63-65 Johnston Street does not conform or contribute to the style of the Heritage Conservation Area and that height limit should not increase as a result.

Planning response / amendments

§ The Heritage Conservation Area acts to preserve the heritage values that can be observed throughout the area. In preserving the specific features and attributes deemed as significant or contributing to an area, the Conservation Area does not exclude the possibility of new development taking place in the area. Nor does this require that new development has to mimic or copy original developments of the area. A high design quality which complements existing development is preferred.

 

The structure at 63-65 Johnston Street does not demonstrate particular architectural or historical value. It is not an object for conservation as some other structures and features in the vicinity are. This is also true of several other structures in the immediate surrounds, including the office structure directly east of the subject site and the supermarket development that comprises the larger portion of the city block.

 

It is certainly arguable that pursuing a higher design and presentation value at the time of construction would have benefitted these buildings, as well as the Fitzmaurice Street precinct as a whole. Despite this, the quality of historical development decisions does not inform the strategic merits or disadvantages of an increased height standard in the present.

 

It is possible that a future development proposal may be refused or modified due to inadequate consideration of heritage. By contrast, refusal of this specific planning proposal on heritage grounds would require demonstration that a greater height of building is inherently opposed to the preservation and retention of heritage items and attributes and therefore new taller development, of any kind, cannot successfully coexist amongst historic design. The basis for such a conclusion is not apparent, in Wagga Wagga or in other locations featuring historical development and design.

 

Any new development proposal at the site, whether within the existing LEP development standards or following an amendment, will be considered in the context of the Heritage Conservation Area. This will consider the preservation of those significant sites and attributes which have been retained in the area as well as the design and presentation quality of any new proposal.

 

i)   Concerns that the planning proposal process means that a later development assessment processes is weakened or partly evaded

 

Comments / issues

§ Concerns were expressed that the pursuit of the planning proposal separate from a development application was potentially an attempt by the developer to obfuscate or obscure the ultimate intent for the site from full scrutiny and, to quote one submission, that this did not pass the ‘pub test’.

Planning response / amendments

§ Any proponent is entitled to lodge a Planning Proposal with Council as a result Council is obliged to assess the planning proposals submitted.  In performing those assessments, Council tests the strategic merit of the specific amendment proposed. This does not preclude a full and thorough assessment of any future development application. To this end, Council’s assessment of the planning proposal has taken account of various development possibilities and scenarios that would emerge if the planning proposal is implemented, not only those foreshadowed by the proponent’s supporting materials.

Council’s assessment supports the increase to the height of buildings as being aligned with the Wagga Wagga Local Strategic Planning Statement.  This does not at all imply that any or all development design of the increased height is suitable to receive development consent.

j)   Concern about applying the new height limit to only one property in the precinct

 

Comments / issues

§ Concerns were expressed about the fact that the proposed height increase would apply to only one property in the precinct, and whether it would be more appropriate to consider the change at a precinct scale.

Planning response / amendments

§ These concerns are noted and there is merit in considering a review of height limits across a broader area. This will be included in the CBD Master Plan project to be commenced this year. In relation to the scenario put forward by this proposal, it is still appropriate and relevant to consider as a standalone proposal in view of the existing character of the site, as well as the central location of the subject land and relevance of this location to objectives of the Wagga Wagga LSPS.

 

 

 

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Attachments

 

1.

LEP20/0010 Gateway Determination - Provided under separate cover

 

2.

LEP20/0010 Addendum to Planning Proposal as exhibited - Provided under separate cover

 

3.

LEP20/0010 Planning Proposal as exhibited - Provided under separate cover

 

4.

LEP20/0010 Redacted submissions - Provided under separate cover

 

5.

LEP20/0010 Assessment report - Provided under separate cover

 

  


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

RP-2

 

RP-2             Planning Proposal LEP20/0007 - Land zoning boundary adjustments to lands nearby Pine Gully Road, Avocet Drive and Rainbow Drive, Estella

Author:        Adam Wood 

Director:      Michael Keys

         

 

Summary:

 

At the Ordinary Meeting on 9 November 2020, Council resolved to support planning proposal LEP20/0007 (the planning proposal) and seek Gateway Determination from the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment.

 

The planning proposal sought to amend land zoning, minimum lot size and urban release area provisions for land located in the western portion of the suburb of Estella known as the Estella Development Area.

 

Council received a Gateway Determination on 26 March 2021 to proceed with the planning proposal subject to public exhibition and agency consultation.

 

The planning proposal was placed on public exhibition from 9 April 2021 to 21 May 2021 (inclusive). Two community submissions and one agency submission were received during the exhibition period.

 

The purpose of this report is to provide feedback on the public consultation and submissions received. A minor amendment to the RE1 Public Recreation zone boundary and a site specific provision requiring an active travel link be provided as part of any future development have been included in response to the submissions.

 

This report recommends adoption of the planning proposal (as amended within this report) and gazettal of the amendment to the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010 (LEP).

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a      note the outcomes of public exhibition of Planning Proposal LEP20/0007;

b      include (as contained in this report) a site-specific clause within Part 7 of the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010 to ensure an active travel link is provided with future subdivision of the land;

c      adopt Planning Proposal LEP20/0007(as amended within this report) to amend the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010;

d      use its delegation as the local plan making authority to approve the legal instrument, notify the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment to gazette the instrument.

 


 

Proposal details

Proposal:

Throughout 2020 Council’s Regional Activation Directorate has collaborated with the land owner to develop a strategic planning framework for the remaining undeveloped part of Estella known as the Estella Development Area. The planning proposal considered by this report implements this planning, by amending the zoning in part of Estella.

Applicant:

This is a Council-initiated planning proposal and has been developed in collaboration with the land owner.

Land Owners

Gracelands Estates Pty Ltd.

Director: Juha Eerik Alatalo

Director: Antti Kullervo Alatalo

Director: Anni-Ilona Alatalo

Referrals:

Internal referral during development of proposal.

Referral to NSW Department of Education and Transport for NSW in accordance with the Gateway Determination.

 

Proposal intent

The planning proposal seeks the following outcomes:

 

1.   Rezone part of Lot 43 DP 1225666 from R1 General Residential zone to E2 Environmental Conservation zone. The extended E2 Environmental Conservation zone will enhance the protection of identified endangered species (Box-Gum Woodland) located at that northern part of Estella and also accommodate an active travel route linking Gobbagombalin in the west to the Estella public school, district park and Charles Sturt University campus in the north. The proposed rezoning is illustrated in Figure 1 below.

 

Figure 1: Rezoning of R1 General Residential to E2 Environmental Conservation


Source: LEP20-0007 Planning Proposal (as exhibited)

 

2.   Amend the land use zoning of parts of Lot 199 DP 1206757 and Lot 6013 DP 1209232 in the southern part of the Estella Development Area. The rezoning seeks to align the RE1 Public Recreation zoned land with the open space commitments outlined in Council’s Recreation, Open Space and Community Strategy 2040 (ROSC 2040).  Notably, this involves rezoning a portion of the RE1 Public Recreation zoned land previously identified for open space which have been relocated to an alternate location within the suburb.

 

3.   A north-south active travel link connecting the B2 Local Centre with the RE1 Public Recreation zoned land to the south will be provided for through a site specific provision to be inserted within Part 7 of the LEP. The RE1 Public Recreation zone land boundary has been extended slightly north adjacent to 20 Comet Place in response to submissions and negotiation with the owner of the land.

 

An irregularly shaped portion of R5 Large Lot Residential zoned land to the south of the development area will be rezoned to R1 General residential to allow for the logical and orderly subdivision of land following the rezoning of the RE1 Public Recreation zoned land. The proposed rezoning as described is illustrated in Figure 2 below.

 

Figure 2: Rezoning of RE1 Public Recreation and R5 Large Lot Residential to R1 General Residential

Source: Post-exhibition revision

 

4.   Remove minimum lot size requirements applying to the land rezoned from R5 Large Lot Residential to R1 General Residential in accordance with the proposed rezoning. The proposed amendment is illustrated in Figure 3 below.

 

Figure 3: Revise the minimum lot size requirement to align with the rezoning of R5 Large Lot Residential to R1 General Residential

Source: LEP20-0007 Planning Proposal (as exhibited)

 

5.   Rezone part of Lot 199 DP 1206757 adjoining the southern side of Avocet Drive from RE1 Public Recreation and R1 General Residential to facilitate an expansion of the B2 Local Centre and a larger and consolidated area of RE1 Public Recreation zoned land for recreational purposes.

 

It is proposed to rezone land immediately south of the B2 Local Centre site from RE1 Public Recreation to R1 General Residential. A site specific provision in Part 7 of the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010 will be introduced to require an active travel link to be provided between the B2 Local Centre and to the RE1 Public Recreation zoned land to the south. The proposed rezoning is illustrated in Figure 4 below.

 

Figure 4: Reconfigured zoning of RE1 Public Recreation, R1 General Residential and B2 Commercial Core.

 

 Source: LEP20-0007 Planning Proposal (as exhibited)

 

6.   Revise the Land Reservation Acquisition Overlay to remove the requirement for Council to acquire part of Lot 199 in DP 1206757 and part Lot 6013 in DP 1209232 in accordance with the revised approach to the provision of recreational open space facilities as outlined within ROSC 2040. The proposed amendment is illustrated in Figure 5 below.

 

Figure 5: Revised Land Reservation Acquisition overlay.

 

Source: Post-exhibition revision

 

7.   Revise the Urban Release Area to correspond to the revised alignment of the R1 General Residential zoned land. The proposed amendment is illustrated in Figure 6 below.

 


 

Figure 6: Urban Release Area overlay.

 

Source: Post-exhibition revision

 

The RE1 Public Recreation zoned land to be rezoned to R1 General Residential is currently privately owned and not classified as community or operational and as such does not require reclassification.

 

Site and Locality

The development site (referred to here as the Estella Development Area) is located in the western, as-yet undeveloped, portion of Estella. It is bound in general by the Old Narrandera Road to the south, Pine Gully Road to the west, Estella Road to the north and the existing extent of the Estella neighbourhood to the east.

 

The extent of the Estella Development Area and the land subject to the planning proposal is illustrated in Figure 6 following. It includes:

•    Lot 199 DP 1206757

•    Lot 6013 DP 1209232

•    Lot 43 DP 1225666.

 

Figure 6: Site area with existing zoning

 

Source: LEP20-0007 Planning Proposal (as exhibited)

 

Gateway Determination

The NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment issued a Gateway Determination for the planning proposal on 26 March 2021 subject to public exhibition and agency consultation. A copy of the Gateway Determination is provided as Attachment 1.

 

Public Exhibition

The planning proposal (Attachment 2) and accompanying exhibition material was placed on public exhibition from 9 April 2021 to 21 May 2021 (inclusive).

 

During the exhibition period, three submissions were received. No other submissions were received following the public exhibition period.

 

Financial Implications

The planning proposal has been developed internally by Council with a view toward obtaining desirable strategic planning and neighbourhood design outcomes within the suburb of Estella. Support has been forthcoming from the landowner in order to achieve these outcomes, and this is reflected in the planning proposal. No application fees were levied for this planning proposal as Council is the proponent for the planning proposal.

The reconfigured zoning of the Estella Development Area within the suburb of Estella, as well as the anticipated submission of Development Applications will facilitate development of these lands for urban purposes. This has financial implications for Council into the future.

Section 7.11 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and the Wagga Wagga Local Infrastructure Contributions Plan 2019 - 2034 enables Council to levy contributions, where anticipated development will or is likely to increase the demand for public facilities.

Section 64 of the Local Government Act 1993, section 306 of the Water Management Act 2000 as well as the City of Wagga Wagga’s Development Servicing Plan for Stormwater 2007 and City of Wagga Wagga Development Servicing Plan for Sewerage 2013 enable Council to levy developer charges based on the increased demands that new development will have on sewer and stormwater.

The section 7.11 and section 64 contributions will apply to and can be levied against any future development on the land. This will be applicable to future Development Applications applying to the lands.

Policy and Legislation

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Wagga Wagga Local Strategic Planning Statement

Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010

 


 

Link to Strategic Plan

The Environment

Objective: We plan for the growth of the city

Outcome: We have sustainable urban development

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

If the planning proposal does not proceed, there is risk of the land owner developing the land consistent with the current zoning configuration. This does not align with Council’s long-term vision for the area and endorsed strategic policy direction in relation to housing targets and recreational open space.

 

As an example of the consequences of this, land within the RE1 Public Recreation zone which is not required under the ROSC 2040 will under the current provisions of the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010 be required to be acquired by Council. Funding for this acquisition, and the subsequent development and maintenance of this open space, is not provided due to the proposed regional open space to the north.

 

Other potential consequences include the inability to deliver meaningfully improved neighbourhood design outcomes for residents and the inability to protect Box-Gum Woodland environmental assets currently within the R1 General Residential zone.

Internal / External Consultation

Council are working closely with the landowner to develop a masterplan for the Estella Development Area. It is anticipated this will comprise part of a future Concept Development Application submitted under Division 4.4 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979. To ensure the provision of an active travel link following the rezoning of land from RE1 Public Recreation to R1 General Residential a site specific provision is proposed within Part 7 of the LEP requiring an active travel link be provided as part of any future subdivision of the land.

 

Councillor workshops have previously been held on 8 March 2020 and 19 October 2020. These workshops informed Councillors of the iterations of the planning proposal as the proposal and the accompanying master planning continued to develop.

 

The planning proposal (Attachment 2) and accompanying exhibition material was placed on public exhibition from 9 April 2021 to 21 May 2021 (inclusive) with engagement methods as per the table below.


 

 

 

 

Mail

Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news story

Council News advert

Media releases

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meetings

Your Say website

Community meetings

Stakeholder workshops

Drop-in sessions

Surveys and feedback forms

Social media

Email newsletters

Website

Digital advertising

TIER

Consult

 

ü

 

ü

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

ü

 

Involve

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The planning proposal and accompanying exhibition material were made available for

viewing by the public on Council’s website and at Council’s Customer Service Counter

in the Civic Centre during the 28 day public exhibition period in accordance with the Gateway Determination and a concurrent period of 42 days was provided for the receipt of written submissions in accordance with Councils policy. Notices with factsheets were provided to adjoining and potentially affected landowners outlining the opportunities to discuss with Council staff and to make comment on the proposal.

 

During the public exhibition period, two community submissions were received along with one agency submission from Transport for NSW (TfNSW). The Department of Education reviewed the planning proposal but did not offer any comments. No further submissions were received following the exhibition period. The redacted submissions are provided at Attachment 3.  Council staff have met with both community submitters following the exhibition period to discuss their comments on the planning proposal.

 

The planning proposal was subject to public consultation where two community submissions were received objecting to the planning proposal. These submissions were from adjoining landowners and raised concerns in relation to the impact of the future development under the planning proposal on the adjoining heritage item ‘Estella Homestead’, a reduction in public open space and a loss of active travel links.

 

Further consideration of the potential impact of the planning proposal on the heritage significance of the adjoining Estella Homestead has concluded that the existing LEP and DCP controls will ensure appropriate heritage impact assessment is undertaken as part of any future development application for subdivision of land or future built form.

 

 


 

A summary of the submissions and responses is provided below:

 

Submission

Response

No. 1

Transport for NSW

Raises the following comments on the proposed zoning boundary adjustments for Councils consideration:

 

i.  Estella has frontage but not direct access to the Olympic Highway. The draft zone adjustments do not represent any changes to the current access arrangements to the Olympic Highway;

 

ii.  In the southern part of Estella, land is being rezoned from RE1 Public Recreation to R1 General Residential with a parkland area running north-south to remain in place. A portion of this land zoned RE1 between Comet Place and the above-mentioned B2 Zoned land should be retained by Council in order to provide an active travel link. This active travel link would then be able to connect the commercial land with the parkland area to the south;

 

 

 

 

iii. In the northern part of Estella, the current E2 Environmental Conservation to the eastern side of Pine Gully Road will increase in size through a rezoning of land currently zoned R1 General Residential. This additional green space will provide a corridor for a pedestrian and cycle pathway between the new school on Estella Road and residential land to the west. Council should consider extending the corridor south of Coopabella Drive to Cootamundra Boulevard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

i.  Noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ii.  Retaining this portion of the RE1 Public Recreation zoned land is undesirable as it abuts the side and rear fences of existing residential properties and will be dissected by the planned extension of east-west roads.

To ensure the provision of an active travel link between the B2 Local Centre zone and the RE1 Public Recreation zoned land to the south of Comet Place, a site-specific provision is proposed within Part 7 of the LEP requiring future development to provide an active travel network. At this stage it is envisaged that this will be in the form of 2.5m wide shared path.

 

 

iii. The extended E2 Environmental Conservation zone will enhance the protection of identified endangered species (Box-Gum Woodland) located at that northern part of the Estella Development Area and also accommodate an active travel route linking Gobbagombalin to the south west of the Estella Development Area to the Estella public school, district park and Charles Sturt University campus to the north.

 

Extending the widened E2 Environmental Conservation zoned land south of Coopabella Drive to Cootamundra Boulevard would not result in retention of any additional significant vegetation. In addition, Council is proposing a pedestrian crossing further north of the intersection with Cootamundra Boulevard which will link to the active travel route through the E2 Environmental Conservation zoned land satisfying the intent of the TfNSW recommendation.

 

No. 2

Adjoining Land Owner

i.    Object to the proposed zone boundary adjustments.

 

ii.    State that they purchased their block of land because they understood it would overlook open space and not have neighbours on the western boundary.

 

 

 

 

 

iii.   Outline loss of amenity for existing dwellings abutting land identified to be rezoned from RE1 to R1. Amenity concerns outlined include a reduction in privacy, reduced views and reduced access.

 

 

 

 

 

 

iv.   Suggest the RE1 zone boundary be moved up to align with the Comet Place cul-de-sac, a strip of land adjoining the residential property be granted to the private land owner to provide a buffer and ensure access to existing side gates is retained.

 

v.   Raise that the proposal would not result in the objectives of the Recreation, Open Space and Community Strategy 2040 being achieved. In particular, the deletion of the central shared pathway, shown in the ROSC to run north-south along the Comet Place open space area between Avocet Drive and the Olympic Highway.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

vi.   Request further information be provided showing how the central shared pathway between Avocet Drive and Olympic Highway (following the Comet Place open space) would be provided to maintain accessibility and connection.

 

vii.  Emphasize the importance of lineal open space links with shared pathways and argue that the portion of the link that is bordered by rear fences can still be a safe and attractive open space corridor.

 

viii. Question whether the use of the existing sports oval north of Estella Road in lieu of providing a district park is in the public interest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ix.   Request further details and calculations showing how the provision of public open space in Estella meets Council’s policy and requirements (including what spatial areas and assumptions were used in the calculations).

 

x.   Request to meet with Council’s strategic planners to further discuss minor changes that could be made to the planning proposal that would substantially minimise the impact of the proposal on our property and amenity.

 

 

i.   Noted.

 

 

ii.  In response to concerns raised in this submission and subsequent engagement between Council and the landowner the RE1 Public Recreation zone boundary has been extended slightly to the north adjacent to 20 Comet Place resolving the landowners concerns in relation to loss of views and amenity.

 

iii. Retention of this strip of RE1 Public Recreation zoned land would result in an undesirable outcome with the RE1 Public Recreation zoned land dissected by planned north-south roads and adjoining the rear and side boundaries of existing residences. Amenity concerns of the landowner of 20 Comet Place have been addressed through a minor amendment to the RE1 Public Recreation zone boundary.

 

iv. The RE1 Public Recreation zone boundary has been adjusted. The existing access to the property should at all times be via legal means such as the road reserve and not via adjoining privately owned land or future open space.

 

 

 

v.  Action BEG7 of the adopted ROSCS 2040 identifies the establishment a lineal park in south west Estella which will be retained under the planning proposal. The WWCC Integrated Transport Strategy identifies this strip of land as the preferred location of an active transport corridor. To ensure the provision of an active travel link running north-south between the B2 Local Centre zone and the RE1 Public Recreation zoned land to the south of Comet Place, a site-specific provision is proposed within Part 7 of the LEP. At this stage it is envisaged that this will be in the form of 2.5m wide shared path.

vi. See response above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

vii.  Retaining this portion of the RE1 Public Recreation zoned land is undesirable as it abuts the side and rear fences of existing residential properties and will be dissected by the planned extension of east-west roads.

 

 

viii. Councils agreement with Charles Sturt University to utilise their recreational assets and provide a precinct park to the north of Estella Road in proximity to the new public school are actions identified within the ROSC 2040. A portion of the RE1 Public Recreation zoned land in the southern portion of the Estella Development Area which was previously set aside for a precinct park/sports fields has been made redundant with a lineal park and local playground proposed instead (consistent with ROSC 2040). The RE1 Public Recreation zone boundary amendments proposed within the planning proposal respond to these actions.

 

 

ix.   The ROSC outlines at a high level how precinct open space is calculated and the 2040 targets. Council has provided the landowner further information in response to this submission.

 

 

 

 

x.   Council officers have met with the landowner and addressed their concerns through an amendment to the RE1 Public Recreation zone boundary and inclusion of a site specific provision ensuring the provision of an active travel network.

No. 3

Adjoining Land Owner

i.    Raise concerns regarding the proposed zone adjustment in the Southern part of proposal from RE1 and R5 to R1 and the impacts this will have on the curtilage of Estella Homestead.

 

ii.    Outline that negotiations were undertaken in 2012 with the developer and Council to ensure the heritage value of Estella Homestead was respected in the future development. The proposal will undermine the previous discussions and result in a detrimental outcome.

 

iii.   Seek to understand Councils heritage advisors opinion on the matter and seek clarification on the impact this will have on the heritage aspects of the Estella Homestead.

 

 

The existing legislative framework for heritage considerations as outlined within clause 5.10 of the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010 and section 3 of the DCP are considered to be sufficient in providing a framework for the proper assessment of potential heritage impacts within future Development Applications for the subdivision of land in accordance with Ministerial Direction 2.3.

 

Future development will be required to illustrate that the heritage value of the Estella Homestead will be protected in a heritage impact statement. At this stage this is anticipated to be through appropriate physical and visual buffers and vegetative screening to minimise impacts.

 

Council officers have met with the landowner to discuss the submission.  The issues raised will be adequately resolved through inclusions and adjustments to the masterplan currently being developed and Council officers will re-engage with the landowner once a final version of the Concept Development Application is available.

 

In summary, it is recommended that Council support planning proposal LEP20/0007 to amend the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010 as outlined within this planning report, noting that following public exhibition two amendments have been made. A minor amendment has been made to the RE1 Public Recreation zone boundary adjoining the northern extent of Comet Place and a site specific provision is proposed to be included within Part 7 of the LEP as set out below:

 

7.13 Certain land at Pine Gully Road and Maitland Drive, Estella

 

(1) The objective of this clause is to ensure an active travel network is provided as part of any subdivision of the subject land.

 

(2) This clause applies to land at Pine Gully Road and Maitland Drive, Estella, being Lot 2, DP 1270330 and Lot 199, DP 1206757.

 

(3) Development consent must not be granted unless the consent authority is satisfied that the resulting subdivision will deliver an active travel link between the B2 Local Centre zoned land fronting Avocet Drive and the RE1 Public Recreation zoned land fronting Comet Place.

 

(4) For the purpose of this clause an ‘active travel network’ is defined as a connected and accessible network of cycling and pedestrian pathways.

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

LEP20/0007 Gateway Determination - Provided under separate cover

 

2.

LEP20/0007 Planning Proposal as exhibited - Provided under separate cover

 

3.

LEP20/0007 Redacted submissions - Provided under separate cover

 

4.

LEP20/0007 Heritage advice - Provided under separate cover

 

  


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

RP-3

 

RP-3             Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Rural Halls

Author:        Madeleine Scully 

Director:      Janice Summerhayes

         

 

Summary:

Council’s Annual Grants Program consists of ten grant categories:

Community Programs and Projects, Recreational Facilities, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Rural Halls, Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Local Heritage, Events, Natural Environment,

Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business. The program offers the opportunity for individuals, community groups and organisations to apply for funding for a range of programs and activities across the Local Government Area. The total amount of funding available in the 2021/22 financial year is $217,000 with an additional $7,400 unallocated and available in the Recreational Facilities category carry over request budget detailed in the Finance report within this business paper. This brings the total budget for the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program to $224,400.

 

This year the Annual Grants Program placed a priority on applications that demonstrated their event, project or program would contribute to decreasing social and community disadvantage in the neighbourhoods of Ashmont, Tolland, Mount Austin and Kooringal. This was in response to the Notice of Motion – Decreasing Social and Community Disadvantage report that was endorsed at the 28 September 2020 Ordinary Meeting of Council.

 

The annual grants application period opened on Monday 15 March 2021 and closed on Monday 17 May 2021. This report provides details regarding the Rural Halls category for 2021/22.

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a      approve the successful applications for the Rural Halls category of the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program as detailed in the report totalling $16,272

b      approve the budget transfers as detailed in the financial implications section of the report

 

Report

The Annual Grants 2021/22 program which consists of ten grant categories; Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Community Programs and Projects, Events, Local Heritage, Natural Environment, Neighbourhood and Rural Village, Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls, Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business.

 

Each category is reported as a separate report to allow Councillors to consider pecuniary or non-pecuniary interests in each report and annual grants category.

 

An overall total of 111 applications were received for assessment in the Annual Grants Program 2021/22 with $224,400 available. The total amount of funding requested by the community across all categories was $549,889.

 

A total of four applications were received in the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program – Rural Halls category.  Applications were assessed with the panel comprising of a Councillor, independent community representatives and staff.  Panel members were Councillor Dan Hayes, Council’s Facilities Management Coordinator and an independent community representative, Ray Birchall.

 

Of the four applications received, a total of $25,292 was requested with $25,000 available. Three applications were successful and recommendation to be fully funded. One was unsuccessful. The total amount of unallocated funds is $8,728. The following table details the successful applications received;

 

Organisation Name

Project Description

Funding Requested

Funding Approved

Reason for Part Funding

Uranquinty Progress Association Inc

Prepare and paint the main hall and kitchen ceilings. Replace 10 tables as previous tables are causing safety issues. Undertake maintenance tasks.

$4,388

$4,388

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Euberta Public Hall

A concrete paved area from the supper door to the two large entrance doors into the main hall area and widening of the supper room door allowing improved access for people with poor mobility.

$8,023

$8,023

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Tarcutta Soldiers Memorial Hall Land Managers

Toilet replumbing to make use of the male and female outside toilet block at the rear of the main Hall building.

$3,861

$3,861

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

 

TOTAL

$16,272

$16,272

 

 

Please see attached for reference a table of unsuccessful applications.

All categories in the Annual Grants program 2021/22 were oversubscribed, except for the Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls and Natural Environment categories.


 

Financial Implications

Annual Grants Category Description

Total Budget

Total funds Allocated

Total Funds

Unallocated

Rural Halls

$25,000

$16,272

$8,728

It is proposed the unallocated funds of $8,728 be transferred to the 2021/22 Rural Halls annual maintenance program, which will contribute toward the services Council can provide to the community for the financial year.

Policy and Legislation

POL 078 – Financial Assistance Policy.

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Place and Identity

Objective: We have opportunities to connect with others

Outcome: Groups, programs and activities bring us together

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

N/A

Internal / External Consultation

Extensive advertising and media communication was undertaken to promote the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program on all Council platforms. A community engagement workshop was held on 26 March 2021. Council staff proactively contacted community networks to promote the annual grants program and to provide assistance in the preparation of applications.

 

 

Mail

Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news story

Council News advert

Media releases

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meetings

Your Say website

Community meetings

Stakeholder workshops

Drop-in sessions

Surveys and feedback forms

Social media

Email newsletters

Website

Digital advertising

TIER

Consult

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Involve

 

 

 

x

x

x

 

x

 

 

 

x

x

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Attachments

 

1.

Annual Grants Program 2021/22 Rural Halls Unsuccessful Applications

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as it deals with: commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it. - Provided under separate cover

 

  


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

RP-4

 

RP-4             Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Arts, Culture and Creative Industries

Author:        Madeleine Scully 

Director:      Janice Summerhayes

         

 

Summary:

Council’s Annual Grants Program consists of ten grant categories:

Community Programs and Projects, Recreational Facilities, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Rural Halls, Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Local Heritage, Events, Natural Environment,

Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business. The program offers the opportunity for individuals, community groups and organisations to apply for funding for a range of programs and activities across the Local Government Area. The total amount of funding available in the 2021/22 financial year is $217,000 with an additional $7,400 unallocated and available in the Recreational Facilities category carry over request budget detailed in the Finance report within this business paper. This brings the total budget for the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program to $224,400.

 

This year the Annual Grants Program placed a priority on applications that demonstrated their event, project or program would contribute to decreasing social and community disadvantage in the neighbourhoods of Ashmont, Tolland, Mount Austin and Kooringal. This was in response to the Notice of Motion – Decreasing Social and Community Disadvantage report that was endorsed at the 28 September 2020 Ordinary Meeting of Council.

 

The annual grants application period opened on Monday 15 March 2021 and closed on Monday 17 May 2021. This report provides details regarding the Arts, Culture and Creative Industries category for 2021/22.

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council approve the successful applications for the Arts, Culture & Creative Industries Category of the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program as detailed in the report totalling $40,000.

 

Report

The Annual Grants 2021/22 program consists of ten grant categories; Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Community Programs and Projects, Events, Local Heritage, Natural Environment, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls, Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business.

 

Each category is reported as a separate report to allow Councillors to consider pecuniary or non-pecuniary interests in each report and annual grants category.

 

An overall total of 111 applications were received for assessment in the Annual Grants Program 2021/22 with $224,400 available. The total amount of funding requested by the community across all categories was $549,889.

A total of twenty applications were received in the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program – Arts, Culture & Creative Industries category. Applications were assessed with the panel comprising of a Councillor, independent community representatives and staff.  Panel members were Councillor Vanessa Keenan, Council’s Cultural Officer and an independent community representative, Sam Bowker.

 

Of the twenty applications received, eight were recommended for support in the Arts, Culture and Creative Industries category including two applications recommended to receive the sustainability incubator support available. The introduction of the sustainability incubator funding was in response to item 2.25 Restructure the Annual Grants Program to encourage growth and sustainability detailed in Council’s Cultural Plan 2020-2030. This aim of this funding is to provide support to successful projects previously funding by this program category, to enable project leaders to prepare the necessary strategic plans to compete for State and Federal grants or create a business plan to ensure the sustainability of their project beyond the funding window of the Annual Grants Program.

 

A total of $93,424 was requested with $40,000 available. Out of these applications eight applications were successful and were recommended to be either fully funded or part funded. Twelve applications were unsuccessful. The total amount of unallocated funds is $0. The following table details the successful applications received:

 

Organisation Name

Project Description

Funding Requested

Funding Approved

Reason for Funding

Wagga City Rugby Male Choir and Murrumbidgee Magic Chorus (Joint application)

Purchase a set of performance riser platforms. The two choirs often perform together at venues where there is no stage or at outdoor sites where riser equipment is required. Once obtained, the risers would be used by both groups, and would also be available to other performing groups for their events.

$5,000

$5,000

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Nest Studio

‘Self and Surroundings’. A mural and workshops which will explore the people of Wagga and their diversity through the visual medium of collage. This mural will be displayed in the window of Nest Studio during completion and can be displayed off-site once completed.

$5,000

$5,000

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

 

Riverina Woodworkers Club Inc

Replace current unsafe table saw with a ‘Sawstop’ which has an electronic brake system that will provide a higher level of safety and usability for members.

$1,900

$1,900

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Harold Gretton

‘Crowded Chamber’ brings chamber music back into the intimate environment for which it was created. Five concerts across three venues in central Wagga and Kooringal. Venues where live music is rarely if ever heard are activated, with performing, local and guest musicians.

$5,000

$5,000

Detailed application and inclusive of areas that have high levels of social and community disadvantage. Recommended to be fully funded.

Anglicare

Local Aboriginal art display within the community centre.

$5,000

$4,322

Part funding recommended due to amount of funding available and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

Theatre on Toast

Live Long & Sparkle is an interactive & family friendly dance party, aimed at celebrating Rainbow Families, to be held on Sunday 13 March 2022 after Mardi Gras.

$4,964

$4,964

An inclusive project with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

 

SUB TOTAL

$26,864

$26,186

 


 

SUSTAINABILITY INCUBATOR

Salad Days

Halfway Print Fest (HPF) is a celebration of independent publishing. Based in Wagga Wagga, HPF brings together zine-makers from across NSW, ACT and VIC for an immersive celebration of DIY culture.

$7,500

$7,500

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Riverina Community College

The development of The Art Factory Strategic Business Plan. Year one of funding will support The Art Factory with a formalised road map that describes how the Art Factory will clarify business focus and direction. Resulting actions of a professional strategic business plan that will show all potential partners / funding bodies the Art Factory is committed to building a sustainable inclusive business.

$6,314

$6,314

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

 

 

TOTAL

$40,678

$40,000

 

 

Please note attached for Councillors reference is a table of unsuccessful applications.

All categories in the Annual Grants program 2021/22 were oversubscribed, except for the Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls and Natural Environment categories.

Financial Implications

Annual Grants Category Description

Total Budget Available

Total funds Allocated

Total Funds

Unallocated

Arts, Culture and Creative Industries category

$40,000

$40,000

$0

 


 

Policy and Legislation

POL 078 – Financial Assistance Policy.

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Place and Identity

Objective: We have opportunities to connect with others

Outcome: Groups, programs and activities bring us together

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

N/A

Internal / External Consultation

Extensive advertising and media communication was undertaken to promote the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program on all Council platforms. A community engagement workshop was held on 26 March 2021. Council staff proactively contacted community networks to promote the annual grants program and to provide assistance in the preparation of applications.

 

 

Mail

Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news story

Council News advert

Media releases

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meetings

Your Say website

Community meetings

Stakeholder workshops

Drop-in sessions

Surveys and feedback forms

Social media

Email newsletters

Website

Digital advertising

TIER

Consult

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Involve

 

 

 

x

x

x

 

x

 

 

 

x

x

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

Annual Grants Program 2021/22 Arts Culture and Creative Industries Unsuccessful Applications

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as it deals with: commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it. - Provided under separate cover

 

  


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

RP-5

 

RP-5             Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Recreational Facilities

Author:        Madeleine Scully 

Director:      Janice Summerhayes

         

 

Summary:

Council’s Annual Grants Program consists of ten grant categories:

Community Programs and Projects, Recreational Facilities, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Rural Halls, Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Local Heritage, Events, Natural Environment,

Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business. The program offers the opportunity for individuals, community groups and organisations to apply for funding for a range of programs and activities across the Local Government Area. The total amount of funding available in the 2021/22 financial year is $217,000 with an additional $7,400 unallocated and available in the Recreational Facilities category carry over request budget detailed in the Finance report within this business paper. This brings the total budget for the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program to $224,400.

 

This year the Annual Grants Program placed a priority on applications that demonstrated their event, project or program would contribute to decreasing social and community disadvantage in the neighbourhoods of Ashmont, Tolland, Mount Austin and Kooringal. This was in response to the Notice of Motion – Decreasing Social and Community Disadvantage report that was endorsed at the 28 September 2020 Ordinary Meeting of Council.

 

The annual grants application period opened on Monday 15 March 2021 and closed on Monday 17 May 2021. This report provides details regarding the Recreational Facilities category for 2021/22.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a      approve the successful applications for the Recreational Facilities category of the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program as detailed in the report totalling $32,086

b      approve the budget transfers as detailed in the financial implications section of the report

 

Report

The Annual Grants 2021/22 program which consists of ten grant categories; Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Community Programs and Projects, Events, Local Heritage, Natural Environment, Neighbourhood and Rural Village, Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls, Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business.

 

Each category is reported as a separate report to allow Councillors to consider pecuniary or non-pecuniary interests in each report and annual grants category.

 

An overall total of 111 applications were received for assessment in the Annual Grants Program 2021/22 with $224,400 available. The total amount of funding requested by the community across all categories was $549,889.

 

A total of eight applications were received in the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program – Recreational Facilities category. Applications were assessed with the panel comprising of a Councillor, independent community representatives and staff. Panel members were Councillor Dallas Tout, Council’s Strategic Recreation Officer and an independent community representative, Luke Olsen.

 

Of the eight applications received, a total of $50,073 was requested with $37,400 available. Six applications were successful and recommended to be either fully funded or part funded. Two applications were unsuccessful. The total amount of unallocated funds is $5,314. Please note the original budget for the 2021/22 Recreational Facilities category was $30,000, with an additional $7,400 unallocated and to be made available in the Recreational Facilities category based on 2020/21 carryovers and of which is subject to the separate finance report RP-17 in this business paper. The following table details the successful applications received.

 

Organisation Name

Project Description

Funding Requested

Funding Approved

Reason for Funding

Hopwood Park Tennis Club

Preservation of Hopwood Park Tennis Courts

$3,573

$3,573

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Wagga Rugby League Inc

Kitchen equipment which includes four stainless steel benches to enhance food safety per the Australian Food Standards Code.

$7,000

$4,013

The application amount included equipment already purchased. The Annual Grants Program does not fund retrospective items therefore the pre-purchased equipment was excluded in the assessment of this application. Recommended to be part funded toward the stainless steel benches which are yet to be purchased.

Wagga Combined Hockey Association

Purchase and installation of two new LED scoreboards for both synthetic hockey fields located at the Jubilee Park Hockey Complex.

$2,000

$2,000

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Wagga Wagga Touch Association

Supply and erection of scoreboard which will allow players and spectators to view the score and also the timing of the game.

$7,500

$7,500

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Wagga Bidgee Canoe Club

A 40-foot shipping container, with appropriate securing hardware, to assist with the need for greater storage and to store the club's kayak trailer onsite will be installed at the riverside area. The location and exterior design of the shipping container will be finalised following consultation between Council’s Recreation Division staff and the Canoe Club.

$7,500

$7,500

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Wagga Wagga School of Arts

Upgrade the Lighting Grid in The Basement Theatre

$7,500

$7,500

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

 

TOTAL

$35,073

$32,086

 

 

Please see attached for reference a table of unsuccessful applications.

All categories in the Annual Grants program 2021/22 were oversubscribed, except for the Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls and Natural Environment categories.


 

Financial Implications

Annual Grants Category Description

Total Budget Available

Total funds Allocated

Total Funds

Unallocated

Recreational Facilities

$37,400

$32,086

$5,314

 

Please note the original budget for the 2021/22 Recreational Facilities category was $30,000, with an additional $7,400 unallocated and to be made available in the Recreational Facilities category based on 2020/21 carryovers and of which is subject to the separate finance report RP-15 in this business paper.

 

It is proposed the unallocated funds for this category of $5,314 be transferred to the 2021/22 Renew Recreational Facilities program, which will contribute toward the services Council can provide to the community for the financial year.

Policy and Legislation

POL 078 – Financial Assistance Policy.

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Place and Identity

Objective: We have opportunities to connect with others

Outcome: Groups, programs and activities bring us together

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

N/A

Internal / External Consultation

Extensive advertising and media communication was undertaken to promote the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program on all Council platforms. A community engagement workshop was held on 26 March 2021. Council staff proactively contacted community networks to promote the annual grants program and to provide assistance in the preparation of applications.

 


 

 

 

 

Mail

Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news story

Council News advert

Media releases

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meetings

Your Say website

Community meetings

Stakeholder workshops

Drop-in sessions

Surveys and feedback forms

Social media

Email newsletters

Website

Digital advertising

TIER

Consult

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Involve

 

 

 

x

x

x

 

x

 

 

 

x

x

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

Annual Grants Program 2021/22 Recreational Facilities Unsuccessful Applications

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as it deals with: commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it. - Provided under separate cover

 

  


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

RP-6

 

RP-6             Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Events

Author:        Madeleine Scully 

Director:      Janice Summerhayes

         

 

Summary:

Council’s Annual Grants Program consists of ten grant categories:

Community Programs and Projects, Recreational Facilities, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Rural Halls, Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Local Heritage, Events, Natural Environment,

Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business. The program offers the opportunity for individuals, community groups and organisations to apply for funding for a range of programs and activities across the Local Government Area. The total amount of funding available in the 2021/22 financial year is $217,000 with an additional $7,400 unallocated and available in the Recreational Facilities category carry over request budget detailed in the Finance report within this business paper. This brings the total budget for the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program to $224,400.

 

This year the Annual Grants Program placed a priority on applications that demonstrated their event, project or program would contribute to decreasing social and community disadvantage in the neighbourhoods of Ashmont, Tolland, Mount Austin and Kooringal. This was in response to the Notice of Motion – Decreasing Social and Community Disadvantage report that was endorsed at the 28 September 2020 Ordinary Meeting of Council.

 

The annual grants application period opened on Monday 15 March 2021 and closed on Monday 17 May 2021. This report provides details regarding the Events category for 2021/22.

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council approve the successful applications for the Events category of the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program as detailed in the report totalling $20,000.

 

Report

The Annual Grants 2021/22 program consists of ten grant categories; Community Programs and Projects, Recreational Facilities, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Rural Halls, Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Local Heritage, Events, Natural Environment, Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business.

 

Each category is reported as a separate report to allow Councillors to consider pecuniary or non-pecuniary interests in each report and annual grants category.

 

An overall total of 111 applications were received for assessment in the Annual Grants Program 2021/22 with $224,400 available. The total amount of funding requested by the community across all categories was $549,889.

 

A total of 18 applications were received in the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program – Events category. Applications were assessed with the panel comprising of a Councillor, independent community representatives and staff.  Panel members were Councillor Dan Hayes, Council’s Event’s Officer and an independent community representative, David Yeates.

 

Of the eighteen applications received, a total of $98,790 was requested with $20,000 available. Out of these applications nine applications were successful and recommended to be either fully funded or part funded. Nine applications were unsuccessful. The total amount of unallocated funds was $0. The following table details the successful applications received:

 

Organisation Name

Project Description

Funding Requested

Funding Approved

Reason for Funding

Wagga Wagga Country Club Ltd

 

Wagga Wagga Country Club 2022 Women’s ProAm. Golf Professionals and amateurs will play together but compete only against their own. There is capacity for 248 players on each day, of which approximately 80 would be professionals.

$7,500

$4,000

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

The Trustee for Country Hope Trust

 

‘Christmas Hope’. A Christmas celebration and gift day for our diagnosed children and their families. We have activities and entertainment for the kids, Santa arrives with a gift for each diagnosed child and their siblings.

$2,500

$1,000

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

Big Springs Homestead

 

‘Sculptures of the Riverina’. An event inspired by Sculptures by the Sea (Sydney) and Sculptures in the Garden (Mudgee), Sculptures of the Riverina will showcase Australian sculptures and artworks within a historic homestead garden and stables on a family farm near Wagga Wagga NSW.

$7,500

$4,000

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

 

Thirsty Crow Brewing Co.

 

Thirsty Crow will be working alongside the Wagga Show Society to present 'Ocrowberfest,' which will form part of Wagga's Annual Show at the Kyeamba Smith Hall. This is a new mini version of the classic Bavarian Oktoberfest, with the inclusion of local food and beverage vendors, local live music and entertainment.

$7,500

$4,000

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

 

 

Estella Progress Association

 

Annual Christmas party provides an opportunity for our residents to come together and enjoy an afternoon of fun for the kids, with jumping castles, BBQ, and a visit from Santa.

$2,000

$500

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received.

Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

Uranquinty CWA Evening Branch

 

'Sconversation'. A forum for people to engage and have important conversations, connecting and increasing awareness of mental health. Speakers will address topics currently being faced and bring attention to impactful issues in regional Australia.

$4,000

$500

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

Bidgee Dragons Inc

 

TRIBE Challenge is the ultimate 6 on 6 reverse tug-of-war where two crews face off in a dragon boat. The challenge will be conducted on Lake Albert. It will be open to dragon boat clubs on Day 1 and corporate or community teams on Day 2.

$2,965

$1,000

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

Inspire Church Wagga

Christmas community neighbourhood event. Showcasing talent from people of all ages, through the telling of the story of Christmas. Following this, there will be a Christmas Carnival which will host food stalls, live music, and free rides for kids.

$7,000

$1,000

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

Wagga Aboriginal Women's Group Incorporated

 

‘Marramarra Aboriginal Markets’ (Marramarra meaning handmade / create in Wiradjuri language). Local Aboriginal Artists and Business owners will be invited to run a store to sell products and showcase their unique talents and cultural knowledge, including art, giftware, clothing, services and food. Activities will include a Welcome to Country by a Wiradjuri Elder, Market stall's selling Aboriginal art/homewares/giftware, traditional cooking demonstration, live music and traditional dance performances.

$6,750

$4,000

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

 

 

 

TOTAL

$47,715

$20,000

 

 

Please see attached for reference a table of unsuccessful applications.

All categories in the Annual Grants program 2021/22 were oversubscribed, except for the Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls and Natural Environment categories.

Financial Implications

Annual Grants Category Description

Total Budget Available

Total funds Allocated

Total Funds

Unallocated

Events

$20,000

$20,000

$0

Policy and Legislation

POL 078 – Financial Assistance Policy.

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Place and Identity

Objective: We have opportunities to connect with others

Outcome: Groups, programs and activities bring us together

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

N/A

Internal / External Consultation

Extensive advertising and media communication was undertaken to promote the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program on all Council platforms. A community engagement workshop was held on 26 March 2021. Council staff proactively contacted community networks to promote the annual grants program and to provide assistance in the preparation of applications.

 

 

Mail

Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news story

Council News advert

Media releases

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meetings

Your Say website

Community meetings

Stakeholder workshops

Drop-in sessions

Surveys and feedback forms

Social media

Email newsletters

Website

Digital advertising

TIER

Consult

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Involve

 

 

 

x

x

x

 

x

 

 

 

x

x

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

Annual Grants Program 2021/22 Events Unsuccessful Applications

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as it deals with: commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it. - Provided under separate cover

 

  


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

RP-7

 

RP-7             Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Youth Led Initiatives

Author:        Madeleine Scully 

Director:      Janice Summerhayes

         

 

Summary:

Council’s Annual Grants Program consists of ten grant categories:

Community Programs and Projects, Recreational Facilities, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Rural Halls, Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Local Heritage, Events, Natural Environment,

Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business. The program offers the opportunity for individuals, community groups and organisations to apply for funding for a range of programs and activities across the Local Government Area. The total amount of funding available in the 2021/22 financial year is $217,000 with an additional $7,400 unallocated and available in the Recreational Facilities category carry over request budget detailed in the Finance report within this business paper. This brings the total budget for the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program to $224,400.

 

This year the Annual Grants Program placed a priority on applications that demonstrated their event, project or program would contribute to decreasing social and community disadvantage in the neighbourhoods of Ashmont, Tolland, Mount Austin and Kooringal. This was in response to the Notice of Motion – Decreasing Social and Community Disadvantage report that was endorsed at the 28 September 2020 Ordinary Meeting of Council.

 

The annual grants application period opened on Monday 15 March 2021 and closed on Monday 17 May 2021. This report provides details regarding the Youth Led Initiatives category for 2021/22.

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council approve the successful applications for the Youth Led Initiatives category of the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program as detailed in the report totalling $15,000.

 

Report

The Annual Grants 2021/22 program which consists of ten grant categories; Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Community Programs and Projects, Events, Local Heritage, Natural Environment, Neighbourhood and Rural Village, Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls, Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business.

 

Each category is reported as a separate report to allow Councillors to consider pecuniary or non-pecuniary interests in each report and annual grants category.

 

An overall total of 111 applications were received for assessment in the Annual Grants Program 2021/22 with $224,400 available. The total amount of funding requested by the community across all categories was $549,889.

 

A total of seven applications were received in the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program Youth Led Initiatives category.  Applications were assessed with the panel comprising of a Councillor, independent community representatives and staff.  Panel members were Councillor Vanessa Keenan, Council’s Youth Development Officer and an independent community representative, Julie Milsom.

 

Of the seven applications received, a total of $21,690 was requested with $15,000 available. Five applications were successful, all fully funded. Two were unsuccessful. The total amount of unallocated funds was $0. The following table details the successful applications recommended to receive:

 

Organisation Name

Project Description

Funding Requested

Funding Approved

Reason for   Funding

Michael Kingsland

Funding for disadvantaged students to participate in the Duke of Edinburgh Award at Wagga Wagga High School. The funding would cover the cost of registration ($140/pp) for 10 students to participate, plus some money to co-ordinate the adventurous journey.

$3,000

$3,000

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes to support disadvantaged youth. Recommendation to fully fund.

Alphabet Soup Youth Group

Alphabet soup youth disco and Alphabet soup educational youth screening aim to create an inclusive and supportive environment for the young LGBTQI+ community of Wagga and surrounding areas.

$3,000

$3,000

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes to support LGBTQI youth. Recommendation to fully fund.

Kayne Lyndon

A mentored music production program, developed in conjunction with our young people, to address the ongoing requests by them for local mentoring in music production. Program explores all aspects of music production from end to end, allowing them to drive the production from inception through to a showcased event at the Curious Rabbit in Wagga Wagga

$3,000

$3,000

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes to support and mentor youth. Recommendation to fully fund.

Wagga Aboriginal Women’s Group Incorporated

Female youth program where local Aboriginal girls will come together for a two day cultural emersion experience with priority to girls from social disadvantaged areas and girls living in out of home care with no connection to their culture. The two day program will include local Wiradjuri female mentors facilitating the program. Which includes a Welcome to Country, a Wagga significant Women's sites tour, traditional women's practice workshop, traditional dance teachings, truth telling, yarning circles and reflection.

$3,000

$3,000

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes to support female Aboriginal youth, prioritising participation by youth from socially disadvantaged backgrounds. Recommendation to fully fund.

Bella Ingram

A series of three small live music events designed to connect young people to their community. Each event features local artists performing in local spaces, for example Cave and Wagga beach, and featuring qualified guest speakers about youth mental health and wellbeing.

$3,000

$3,000

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to fully fund.

 

TOTAL

$15,000

$15,000

 

 

Please see attached for reference a table of unsuccessful applications.

All categories in the Annual Grants program 2021/22 were oversubscribed, except for the Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls and Natural Environment categories.

 

 

 

Financial Implications

Annual Grants Category Description

Total Budget Available

Total funds Allocated

Total Funds

Unallocated

Youth Led Initiatives

$15,000

$15,000

$0

Policy and Legislation

POL 078 – Financial Assistance Policy.

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Place and Identity

Objective: We have opportunities to connect with others

Outcome: Groups, programs and activities bring us together

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

N/A

Internal / External Consultation

Extensive advertising and media communication was undertaken to promote the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program on all Council platforms. A community engagement workshop was held on 26 March 2021. Council staff proactively contacted community networks to promote the annual grants program and to provide assistance in the preparation of applications.

 

 

Mail

Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news story

Council News advert

Media releases

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meetings

Your Say website

Community meetings

Stakeholder workshops

Drop-in sessions

Surveys and feedback forms

Social media

Email newsletters

Website

Digital advertising

TIER

Consult

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Involve

 

 

 

x

x

x

 

x

 

 

 

x

x

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Attachments

 

1.

Annual Grants Program 2021/22 Youth Led Initiatives Unsuccessful Applications

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as it deals with: commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it. - Provided under separate cover

 

  


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

RP-8

 

RP-8             Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Natural Environment

Author:        Madeleine Scully 

Director:      Janice Summerhayes

         

 

Summary:

Council’s Annual Grants Program consists of ten grant categories:

Community Programs and Projects, Recreational Facilities, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Rural Halls, Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Local Heritage, Events, Natural Environment,

Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business. The program offers the opportunity for individuals, community groups and organisations to apply for funding for a range of programs and activities across the Local Government Area. The total amount of funding available in the 2021/22 financial year is $217,000 with an additional $7,400 unallocated and available in the Recreational Facilities category carry over request budget detailed in the Finance report within this business paper. This brings the total budget for the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program to $224,400.

 

This year the Annual Grants Program placed a priority on applications that demonstrated their event, project or program would contribute to decreasing social and community disadvantage in the neighbourhoods of Ashmont, Tolland, Mount Austin and Kooringal. This was in response to the Notice of Motion – Decreasing Social and Community Disadvantage report that was endorsed at the 28 September 2020 Ordinary Meeting of Council.

 

The annual grants application period opened on Monday 15 March 2021 and closed on Monday 17 May 2021. This report provides details regarding the Natural Environment category for 2021/22.

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a      approve the successful applications for the Natural Environment category of the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program as detailed in the report totalling $7,000

b      approve the budget transfers as detailed in the financial implications section of the report

 

Report

The Annual Grants 2021/22 program which consists of ten grant categories; Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Community Programs and Projects, Events, Local Heritage, Natural Environment, Neighbourhood and Rural Village, Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls, Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business.

 

Each category is reported as a separate report to allow Councillors to consider pecuniary or non-pecuniary interests in each report and annual grants category.

 

An overall total of 111 applications were received for assessment in the Annual Grants Program 2021/22 with $224,400 available. The total amount of funding requested by the community across all categories was $549,889.

 

A total of three applications were received in the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program – Natural Environment category.  Applications were assessed with the panel comprising of a Councillor, independent community representatives and staff.  Panel members were Councillor Vanessa Keenan, Council’s Environmental Officer and an independent community representative, William Adlong.

 

Of the three applications received a total of $6,312 was requested with $7,000 available. All applications were successful. The total amount of unallocated funds was $688. The following table details the successful applications received:

 

Organisation Name

Project Description

Funding Requested

Funding Approved

Reason for Funding

Collette Geier

A garden will be developed on disused and unmaintained Council land located on the northern corner of Fernleigh Road and Macleay Street. Currently the space is covered in weeds and is not used for any purpose. A group of local residents will design and construct an engaging and creative space to be enjoyed by local residents.

$1,232

$1,232

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Wagga Wagga Urban Landcare

Purchase a trailer, to allow our Landcare group to increase the scale of is activities, particularly relating to revegetation and rubbish removal working bees.

$2,750

$2,750

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Rotary Club of South Wagga Wagga

A continuation project "Reconnecting and invigorating community with Intergenerational knowledge sharing through the “Rocky Hill Project " which transfers intergenerational knowledge for the benefit of Rocky Hill, a much used, but until 2020, under resourced asset for Wagga.

$2,330

$2,330

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

 

TOTAL

$6,312

$6,312

 

 

All categories in the Annual Grants program 2021/22 were oversubscribed, except for the Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls and Natural Environment categories.

Financial Implications

Annual Grants Category Description

Total Budget Available

Total funds Allocated

Total Funds

Unallocated

Natural Environment

$7,000

$6,312

$688

 

It is proposed the unallocated funds of $688 be transferred to the 2021/22 Biodiversity Education and Programs cost centre, which will contribute toward the services Council can provide to the community for the financial year.

Policy and Legislation

POL 078 – Financial Assistance Policy.

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Place and Identity

Objective: We have opportunities to connect with others

Outcome: Groups, programs and activities bring us together

Risk Management Issues for Council

NA

Internal / External Consultation

Extensive advertising and media communication was undertaken to promote the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program on all Council platforms. A community engagement workshop was held on 26 March 2021. Council staff proactively contacted community networks to promote the annual grants program and to provide assistance in the preparation of applications.

 

 

Mail

Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news story

Council News advert

Media releases

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meetings

Your Say website

Community meetings

Stakeholder workshops

Drop-in sessions

Surveys and feedback forms

Social media

Email newsletters

Website

Digital advertising

TIER

Consult

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Involve

 

 

 

x

x

x

 

x

 

 

 

x

x

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

RP-9

 

RP-9             Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Local Heritage

Author:        Madeleine Scully 

Director:      Janice Summerhayes

         

 

Summary:

Council’s Annual Grants Program consists of ten grant categories:

Community Programs and Projects, Recreational Facilities, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Rural Halls, Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Local Heritage, Events, Natural Environment,

Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business. The program offers the opportunity for individuals, community groups and organisations to apply for funding for a range of programs and activities across the Local Government Area. The total amount of funding available in the 2021/22 financial year is $217,000 with an additional $7,400 unallocated and available in the Recreational Facilities category carry over request budget detailed in the Finance report within this business paper. This brings the total budget for the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program to $224,400.

 

This year the Annual Grants Program placed a priority on applications that demonstrated their event, project or program would contribute to decreasing social and community disadvantage in the neighbourhoods of Ashmont, Tolland, Mount Austin and Kooringal. This was in response to the Notice of Motion – Decreasing Social and Community Disadvantage report that was endorsed at the 28 September 2020 Ordinary Meeting of Council.

 

The annual grants application period opened on Monday 15 March 2021 and closed on Monday 17 May 2021. This report provides details regarding the Local Heritage category for 2021/22.

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council approve the successful applications for the Local Heritage category of the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program as detailed in the report totalling $15,500.

 

Report

The Annual Grants 2021/22 program consists of ten grant categories; Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Community Programs and Projects, Events, Local Heritage, Natural Environment, Neighbourhood and Rural Village, Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls, Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business.

 

Each category is reported as a separate report to allow Councillors to consider pecuniary or non-pecuniary interests in each report and annual grants category.

 

An overall total of 111 applications were received for assessment in the Annual Grants Program 2021/22 with $224,400 available. The total amount of funding requested by the community across all categories was $549,889.

 

A total of nine applications received in the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program – Local Heritage category.

 

Applications were assessed with the panel comprising of a Councillor and staff.  Panel members were Councillor Dan Hayes, Heritage Adviser, David Scobie and Council’s Town Planner.

 

Of the nine applications received, a total of $54,420 was requested with $15,500 available. Out of these applications six applications were successful and recommended to be either fully funded or part funded. Three applications were unsuccessful. The total amount of unallocated funds is $0. The following table details the successful applications received:

 

Name

Project Description

Funding Requested

Funding Approved

Reason for Part Funding

Jennifer Reid

Restore Lower Front Timber Veranda of 'Chillingley' Gurwood Street Wagga.

$8,000

$2,775

Part funding due to amount of funding available and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

 

Diocese of Wagga Wagga

Conservation and restoration of verandas as part of a restoration plan for the Mt Erin convent building.

$10,000

$1,000

Part funding due to amount of funding available and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

 

Nicole Cross

Replacement of deteriorated roofing of the veranda attached to the building at 69 Coleman Street Wagga

$5,940

$2,775

Part funding due to amount of funding available and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

 

Mackenna Powell

Remediation works to existing awning at 38 Fitzmaurice Street Wagga Wagga

$10,000

$2,775

Part funding due to amount of funding available and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

 

Madeline Clark

Repair timber sash windows and replace glass panels in French door and front windows at Kyeamba Station, Kyeamba

$4,695

$3,400

Part funding due to amount of funding available and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

 

Kim Wilson

Replacement of Roof Sheeting at 67 Coleman Street Wagga Wagga

$5,400

$2,775

Part funding due to amount of funding available and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

 

 

TOTAL

$44,035

$15,500

 

 

Please see attached for reference a table of unsuccessful applications.

All categories in the Annual Grants program 2021/22 were oversubscribed, except for the Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls and Natural Environment categories.


 

Financial Implications

Annual Grants Category Description

Total Budget Available

Total funds Allocated

Total Funds

Unallocated

Local Heritage

$15,500

$15,500

$0

Policy and Legislation

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Place and Identity

Objective: We have opportunities to connect with others

Outcome: Groups, programs and activities bring us together

Risk Management Issues for Council

POL 078 – Financial Assistance Policy.

Internal / External Consultation

Extensive advertising and media communication was undertaken to promote the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program on all Council platforms. A community engagement workshop was held on 26 March 2021. Council staff proactively contacted community networks to promote the annual grants program and to provide assistance in the preparation of applications.

 

 

Mail

Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news story

Council News advert

Media releases

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meetings

Your Say website

Community meetings

Stakeholder workshops

Drop-in sessions

Surveys and feedback forms

Social media

Email newsletters

Website

Digital advertising

TIER

Consult

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Involve

 

 

 

x

x

x

 

x

 

 

 

x

x

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

Annual Grants Program 2021/22 Local Heritage Unsuccessful Applications

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as it deals with: commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it. - Provided under separate cover

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

RP-10

 

RP-10           Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Neighbourhood and Rural Villages

Author:        Madeleine Scully 

Director:      Janice Summerhayes

         

 

Summary:

Council’s Annual Grants Program consists of ten grant categories:

Community Programs and Projects, Recreational Facilities, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Rural Halls, Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Local Heritage, Events, Natural Environment,

Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business. The program offers the opportunity for individuals, community groups and organisations to apply for funding for a range of programs and activities across the Local Government Area. The total amount of funding available in the 2021/22 financial year is $217,000 with an additional $7,400 unallocated and available in the Recreational Facilities category carry over request budget detailed in the Finance report within this business paper. This brings the total budget for the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program to $224,400.

 

This year the Annual Grants Program placed a priority on applications that demonstrated their event, project or program would contribute to decreasing social and community disadvantage in the neighbourhoods of Ashmont, Tolland, Mount Austin and Kooringal. This was in response to the Notice of Motion – Decreasing Social and Community Disadvantage report that was endorsed at the 28 September 2020 Ordinary Meeting of Council.

 

The annual grants application period opened on Monday 15 March 2021 and closed on Monday 17 May 2021. This report provides details regarding the Neighbourhood and Rural Villages category for 2021/22.

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council approve the successful applications for the Neighbourhood and Rural Villages Category of the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program as detailed in the report totalling $22,000.

 

Report

The Annual Grants 2021/22 program which consists of ten grant categories; Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Community Programs and Projects, Events, Local Heritage, Natural Environment, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls, Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business.

 

Each category is reported as a separate report to allow Councillors to consider pecuniary or non-pecuniary interests in each report and annual grants category.

 

An overall total of 111 applications were received for assessment in the Annual Grants Program 2021/22 with $224,400 available. The total amount of funding requested by the community across all categories was $549,889.

A total of eight applications were received in the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program – Neighbourhood and Rural Villages category. 

 

Applications were assessed with the panel comprising of a Councillor, independent community representatives and staff.  Panel members were Councillor Vanessa Keenan, Council’s Acting Social Planning Coordinator and an independent community representative, Laura Johnstone.

 

Of the eight applications received, a total of $27,898 was requested with $22,000 available. Out of these applications seven applications were successful and recommended to be either fully funded or part funded. One application was unsuccessful. The total amount of unallocated funds is $0. The following table details the successful applications received:

 

Organisation Name

Project Description

Funding Requested

Funding Approved

Reason for Funding

Humula Citizens and Sports Club

Camp Fire Fun - Music and Dinner. Would like to highlight a local band and hope that if successful, this could become a yearly event for our club.

$1,000

$1,000

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Lake Albert Playgroup

Renew Lake Albert Playgroup's recreational equipment

$4,413

$4,321

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

Ladysmith Playgroup

Creative Youth Connections will facilitate Local Wagga Wagga theatre and performing arts company Oddball as Artist in residence at Ladysmith Playgroup. Will provide a harmonious, imaginative and inclusive program, available to all families with pre-school aged children (0-6 yrs) within the Ladysmilth community and surrounding region.

$5,000

$5,000

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

LikeMind Wagga

Community Movie screening day of the film 'Dhuluyarra (speak truly) Aunty & Uncle'. The film consists of recorded discussions with our Local Aboriginal Elders to highlight the impacts of disconnections to culture in the community.

$4,000

$2,480

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

Wagga Wagga Camera Group

 

(Auspiced by Multicultural Council of Wagga Wagga)

Apple Mac laptop and a Television monitor to digitally view, edit and share their work.

$3,424

$3,424

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Ladysmith Memorial Hall

A new energy-efficient fridge for Ladysmith Hall

$780

$780

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

Kachin Community of Wagga Wagga

 

(Auspiced by Multicultural Council of Wagga Wagga)

Wai'miya De'kekah (To Share through Music) project aims to add to the pool of resources that are available to local cultural communities to be able to independently host events and celebrations.

$4,995

$4,995

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

 

TOTAL

$23,612

$22,000

 

 


 

Please see attached for reference a table of unsuccessful applications.

All categories in the Annual Grants program 2021/22 were oversubscribed, except for the Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls and Natural Environment categories.

Financial Implications

Annual Grants Category Description

Total Budget Available

Total funds Allocated

Total Funds

Unallocated

Neighbourhood and Rural Villages

$22,000

$22,000

$0

Policy and Legislation

POL 078 – Financial Assistance Policy.

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Place and Identity

Objective: We have opportunities to connect with others

Outcome: Groups, programs and activities bring us together

Risk Management Issues for Council

N/A

Internal / External Consultation

Extensive advertising and media communication was undertaken to promote the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program on all Council platforms. A community engagement workshop was held on 26 March 2021. Council staff proactively contacted community networks to promote the annual grants program and to provide assistance in the preparation of applications.

 

 

Mail

Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news story

Council News advert

Media releases

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meetings

Your Say website

Community meetings

Stakeholder workshops

Drop-in sessions

Surveys and feedback forms

Social media

Email newsletters

Website

Digital advertising

TIER

Consult

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Involve

 

 

 

x

x

x

 

x

 

 

 

x

x

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Attachments

 

1.

Annual Grants Program 2021/22 Neighbourhood and Rural Villages Unsuccessful Applications

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as it deals with: commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it. - Provided under separate cover

 

  


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

RP-11

 

RP-11           Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Small Business

Author:        Madeleine Scully 

Director:      Janice Summerhayes

         

 

Summary:

Council’s Annual Grants Program consists of ten grant categories:

Community Programs and Projects, Recreational Facilities, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Rural Halls, Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Local Heritage, Events, Natural Environment,

Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business. The program offers the opportunity for individuals, community groups and organisations to apply for funding for a range of programs and activities across the Local Government Area. The total amount of funding available in the 2021/22 financial year is $217,000 with an additional $7,400 unallocated and available in the Recreational Facilities category carry over request budget detailed in the Finance report within this business paper. This brings the total budget for the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program to $224,400.

 

This year the Annual Grants Program placed a priority on applications that demonstrated their event, project or program would contribute to decreasing social and community disadvantage in the neighbourhoods of Ashmont, Tolland, Mount Austin and Kooringal. This was in response to the Notice of Motion – Decreasing Social and Community Disadvantage report that was endorsed at the 28 September 2020 Ordinary Meeting of Council.

 

The annual grants application period opened on Monday 15 March 2021 and closed on Monday 17 May 2021. This report provides details regarding the Small Business category for 2021/22.

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council approve the successful applications for the Small Business category of the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program as detailed in the report totalling $12,500.

 

Report

The Annual Grants 2021/22 program which consists of ten grant categories; Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Community Programs and Projects, Events, Local Heritage, Natural Environment, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls, Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business.

 

Each category is reported as a separate report to allow Councillors to consider pecuniary or non-pecuniary interests in each report and annual grants category.

 

An overall total of 111 applications were received for assessment in the Annual Grants Program 2021/22 with $224,400 available. The total amount of funding requested by the community across all categories was $549,889.

 

A total of 18 applications were received in the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program – Small Business category.

Applications were assessed with the panel comprising of a Councillor, independent community representatives and staff.  Panel members were Councillor Dallas Tout, Council’s Economic Development Officer (pre assessment) Executive Assistant, Regional Activation and an independent community representative, Angela Rey.

 

A total of 18 applications were received, requesting a total of $100,628 with $12,500 available. Out of these applications six applications were successful, either fully funded or part funded and notably there are two Wiradjuri and First Nations female led local businesses recommended to be supported in this category. Twelve applications were unsuccessful. The total amount of unallocated funds is $0.

 

The following table details the successful applications received:

 

Organisation Name

Project Description

Funding Requested

Funding Approved

Reason for Funding

Ashleigh Pengelly

Purchase sublimation printing machine for retail products made in the Wagga LGA. Ability to print own Aboriginal artwork designs straight onto items such as candle jars, in particular her Wiradjuri candle. The machine will be made available for businesses, events, festivals etc, particularly for promotional products

$6,000

$1,583

Part funding due to amount of funding available and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

 

The Little Yellow House Gallery

To establish and run a selection of arts workshops starting with a program for Emergency Service/First Response/Health workers. This will be the start of workshops building up to a regular business of paid workshops providing weekly income.

$1,720

$1,720

Panel recommended fully funding this innovative project and noted this was a well written detailed application.

 

Alice Peacock

Has been working in projection art since Vivid Sydney, 2019. Is getting increasing requests for projection work locally and in surrounding regions. Purchasing a professional grade projector will enable my business to start accepting small to medium sized projection work.

$1,875

$1,000

Part funding due to amount of funding available and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

Prickly Lizard Events

Aboriginal owned - female led business in Wagga Wagga on Wiradjuri Country, have recently purchased a mobile coffee van. Funding to assist in purchasing a generator and exterior signage for the van.

$4,619

$2,287

Part funding due to amount of funding available and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

Zana Aerial Dance Academy

Purchase of a customised trailer to transport portable rig and associated equipment to offsite shows and workshops. Currently borrowing a basic open box trailer and are restricted to dates when it can be accessed. An enclosed, lockable trailer would mean gear can be safely stored overnight at a venue, opening up a whole new set of events for us.

$3,910

$3,910

Well written applications with a clearly defined budget. Recommended to be fully funded.

 

Sculpted Jewels

Purchase of casting machine and burnout furnace to be available locally for use by local artisans, and for training purposes, thereby retaining the work and revenue within the Wagga LGA, rather than having to send all the work elsewhere.

$4,661

$2,000

Good collaboration with local business. Well written and detailed application.

Part funding due to amount of funding available and the number of applications received.

 

 

TOTAL

$22,785

$12,500

 

 

Please see attached for reference a table of unsuccessful applications.

All categories in the Annual Grants program 2021/22 were oversubscribed, except for the Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls and Natural Environment categories.

Financial Implications

Annual Grants Category Description

Total Budget Available

Total funds Allocated

Total Funds

Unallocated

Small Business

$12,500

$12,500

$0

Policy and Legislation

POL 078 – Financial Assistance Policy.

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Place and Identity

Objective: We have opportunities to connect with others

Outcome: Groups, programs and activities bring us together

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

N/A

Internal / External Consultation

Extensive advertising and media communication was undertaken to promote the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program on all Council platforms. A community engagement workshop was held on 26 March 2021. Council staff proactively contacted community networks to promote the annual grants program and to provide assistance in the preparation of applications.

 

 

Mail

Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news story

Council News advert

Media releases

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meetings

Your Say website

Community meetings

Stakeholder workshops

Drop-in sessions

Surveys and feedback forms

Social media

Email newsletters

Website

Digital advertising

TIER

Consult

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Involve

 

 

 

x

x

x

 

x

 

 

 

x

x

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

Annual Grants Program 2021/22 Small Business Unsuccessful Applications

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as it deals with: personnel matters concerning particular individuals. - Provided under separate cover

 

  


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

RP-12

 

RP-12           RRL DEED OF AGREEMENT EXPIRY DATE AND WAGGA WAGGA CITY COUNCIL LIBRARY SERVICE OPTIONS

Author:        Madeleine Scully 

Director:      Janice Summerhayes

         

 

Summary:

Wagga Wagga City Council is currently reviewing whether to join the Riverina Regional Library (RRL) network again when the next agreement commences in July 2022 OR alternatively, to not participate in the next RRL agreement and provide library services on a standalone basis.

 

RRL member Councils voted at the 31 March 2021 Advisory Committee meeting on a recommendation from the RRL Executive Director through the RRL Executive Committee to adopt a new model for Council contributions to RRL. The majority of member Councils voted for this model. The model adopted by the RRL Advisory Committee for the next agreement period is referenced in the attached Councillor Briefing paper as Option 1a. This model reduces the Wagga City Council payment to RRL from $1,333,856 (2020/21) to an estimated $1,158,181 (2022/23).

 

This report seeks Councillors to confirm their In-Principle Support for the Standalone Wagga Wagga City Library Service Option on expiry of the current RRL Deed of Agreement. This outcome would inform a report to the 22 November 2021 Ordinary Council meeting for the incoming new Council to further ratify the July position. This process will allow a timeframe for RRL planning and member Council notifications leading up to the June 2022 expiry of the current Deed of Agreement. Please note that accompanying this report and under separate cover there is a confidential report and briefing paper with detailed costings.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a      consider the confidential report and briefing paper on a review of WWCL service delivery and provide In Principle Support for the Standalone Wagga Wagga City Library Service Option noting a graduated implementation post June 2022 as referenced in this report

b      noting if this option is supported no further funds will be requested to undertake the rest of the proposed works in Stage 2 Library Review as the proposed reserve to be established in the Standalone Option will be used to leverage funds for any capital works required from State and Federal funds received

c      receive a further report at the 22 November 2021 Ordinary Council meeting to allow for the incoming 2021 Council to ratify the 26 July Council resolution

d      send a letter of thanks and acknowledgement to Riverina Regional Library for the services provided over the past term agreements

 

 

Report

Under the NSW Library Act 1939 (Act) where two or more local authorities wish to enter into an agreement relating to local library services the Act specifies agreements being 12(1), 12(2) and 12(A). The Riverina Regional Library (RRL) operates under 12(1) of the Act.

 

The relationship between RRL and its member councils is determined by a number of

documents including a four-year Deed of Agreement with an annual Service Agreement specifying general areas of service provision. As part of the Deed of Agreement operating parameters Wagga Wagga City Council is the Executive Council providing the administrative services for RRL.

 

From Council’s adopted Cultural Plan 2020-2030 a Wagga Wagga City Library Review was undertaken and endorsed by Council at the 18 January 2021 Ordinary Council meeting. As detailed in stage 2 of the Library review there was a high value placed by the community on the existing central library facility and services. However, it was noted at the same time the Library needed to expand its service for current and growing population needs of the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area, at both the Civic Centre location and to provide a new agile library programming outreach service, which was more than a borrowing service to the City’s suburban neighbourhoods and village communities across the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area.  Stage 2 recommendations in the Library review were interdependent with the outcomes of the separate consultation review with RRL re: the funding Deed of Agreement beyond the expiry date of 30 June 2022. The catalysts for re-examining Wagga Wagga City Council’s participation in RRL is due to the following:

 

·     Being able to implement the adopted Library review recommendations against a growing population for all residents in the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area (LGA), of which takes account of extensive consultation and feedback from our residents and ratepayers. This identified gaps and inequity issues in current service levels and the ability to expand and deliver new services across the Local Government Area (LGA) and across city suburbs.

 

·     The cost and contribution rate that Wagga Wagga City Library pays to RRL in the current agreement is unsustainable as it renders WWCC with no capacity to increase or introduce new service levels for Library service provision across the LGA. This is important in the wider context of Council’s deficit budgets forecasted in the Long-Term Financial Plan.

 

A briefing paper on the Riverina Regional Library (RRL) Deed of Agreement expiry come June 2022 and Wagga Wagga City Council Library Service options was tabled at a Councillor workshop on 5 July 2021. The briefing paper is attached to the accompanying confidential report which provides the detailed costings and information of the options. This is due to individuals in positions and commercial in confidence costings.

 

The current services provided by RRL to Wagga Wagga City Library (WWCL) are as follows:

 

1.   Procurement contract management for the outsourced purchasing and processing of collections (physical and electronic). Some on-site processing for DVDs and donated books.

2.   Contract management for the provision of the library management system, which manages stock and members.

 

3.   Community learning programs and promotional material. The current programs that Wagga City Library utilises from RRL are Book Club tubs (450 tubs pa), Storytime kits (40 kits pa), and the 5 allocated sessions per annum from RRL staff, delivered at the Wagga branch as Baby Bounce sessions.

 

A mobile library delivery and collection service that occurs fortnightly to the following villages for residents to borrow books, DVDs, magazines and audio books.

 

   Village

Day

Time

Frequency

 Uranquinty

Mondays

 3.30pm – 5:00pm

90 minutes fortnightly

 Collingullie

Tuesdays

 3:45pm – 4:45pm

 1-hour fortnightly

 Humula

Wednesdays

 9:15am – 11:15am

 2-hours fortnightly

 Ladysmith

Thursdays

 1:30pm – 2:15pm

 45 mins fortnightly

 Tarcutta

Fridays

 9:00am – 11:00am

 2-hours fortnightly

 

4.   Provision of RRL governance and library operational policies and procedures.

 

5.   Internal courier service for moving tubs of books, DVDs, audio books and magazines between branches for inter branch loans.

 

6.   Provision of two Branch member meetings per annum.  One is an annual training session. The other is a general business Branch library meeting.

 

7.   Managing the eLibrary services contract including provision of eBooks and other resources, hosting online databases and maintaining the RRL website.

 

8.   Administration services for the RRL Advisory Committee and a report to the Executive Council including the six-monthly service level agreement performance report, collation of member council statistics for the annual regional Bibliostat return to the State Library NSW and by request crystal data reports for branches.  

 

Wagga Wagga City Council (WWCC) and all RRL member Councils enjoy reciprocal borrowing rights with all the other Councils across NSW. This means our residents can use other Council’s library facilities and vice versa. This reciprocal arrangement is set up by the State Library NSW with each NSW Council. WWCC is the Executive Council for the RRL.  In this capacity we provide financial management and accounting, fleet management, human resources and hold the key risks associated with the RRL service as the only legal entity attached to the functions of the RRL.  WWCC was paid $76,337 in 2020/21 for the provision of these services and risk acceptance.

 

In preparation for the next Deed of Agreement, RRL has reviewed its fee calculation methodology.  This reviewed methodology reduces the Wagga Wagga City Library contribution from $1,333,856 (2020/21) to an estimated $1,158,181 in the first year of the new agreement term (2022/23), should WWCC decide to continue as a member in the new agreement. The total cost of the Wagga Wagga City Library service for 2022/23 would be $2,446,600.

 

WWCC has an alternative option, which is to stand alone and not join the RRL when the next agreement is formed. The total proposed cost for a Standalone Library service model is $2,491,466 for 2022/23. The confidential report on this matter within this business paper includes detailed costings for this option. Council has an adopted Long-Term Financial Plan allocation of $2,715,980 for 2022/23 for the total Wagga City Library service that includes the RRL service components that RRL provide. If Council was to move to a Standalone Library service model, there would be a saving of $224,514 for 2022/23 against the current adopted Long Term Financial Plan. The Standalone option provides increased services for residents and ratepayers, as well as providing for a better value proposition that would include the establishment of a Library reserve and savings returned to the deficit position of Council across the 2022/23 Long Term Financial Plan.

 

The main benefit to the Wagga Wagga community of moving to a standalone library service is that Council will be able to provide BOTH the services provided by the Riverina Regional Library plus a whole range of additional services including a 100% increase to the current village service frequency, the extension of the village service to include all 9 villages (up from 5 currently provided by RRL) and a new service established for the suburbs of Wagga Wagga, the delivery of programs to all the villages and suburbs and an increase in service levels at the Civic Centre.

 

The Standalone option for Wagga Wagga City Library Service is recommended by staff post June 2022, as this represents a strong return on investment proposition to Council, residents and ratepayers living in the Wagga Wagga LGA. Staff have taken on board Councillor feedback out of the Councillor workshop held on 5 July 2021 for this option to be gradually implemented over six to twelve months post 2022, so as to allow for internal staff project management and to take account of further engagement of schedules with rural and suburban locations, with the flexibility to adjust accordingly to specific locational needs. In addition to applying for available external grants, staff will be using the reserve that is established under this option to leverage other grant funding to progress with design/fit out and location improvements to tested community buildings and spaces as part of meeting the Library review recommendations.

 

This option will enable Wagga Wagga City Library (WWCL) to deliver the recommendations outlined in Stage 2 of the Wagga Wagga Library review including expanded services at the Library and the establishment of new library services for the community in suburban and village locations across the LGA. Importantly this option will provide a reserve for the WWCL to leverage other Federal and State Funding along with returning a saving to the deficit position of the Long-Term Financial Plan.  The Standalone option will address the following:

 

·     Delivery of a contemporary, responsive best practice library service as benchmarked and requested by the community out of extensive consultation undertaken as part of the Wagga Wagga Library Review

 

·     Increased library service provision to current and new community library users across 7 days per week at the civic centre location and the establishment of new, weekly library service provision to suburban and village locations across the LGA.

 

 ·    Respond to Council’s 28 September 2020 resolution to reduce social and community disadvantage by providing an on-going service to SA1 locations for example: sequencing this service as part of the renewal and social transformation planning project for Tolland.

 

·     Increase library membership to 50%+ of the total Wagga Wagga LGA population (currently 30%) through expanded hub and spoke service model.

 

·     Enable the creation of an internal Library reserve based on 50% of the budget saving to fund any co-contributions required of grant funding applications.

 

·     Enable WWCL to test and pilot other Stage 2 Library Review projects identified such as library kiosks, ‘library of things’ in suburban locations and other outreach models with partners such as the CSU library and Estella Public School community hall.

 

·     Provide 50% of the saving back to WWCC to assist with deficit budgets over the life of the LTFP.

 

The following information details how this has been determined.

 

To operate a standalone library service, we would need to provide the current RRL services noting we would not be required to operate an internal courier service or administer the RRL advisory committee. Providing this service internally will require:

 

1.   Procurement and vendor contract management for the outsourced purchasing and processing of collections (physical and electronic). Some on-site processing for DVDs and donated books $418,009

 

2.   Contract management for the provision of the library management system the operating system to manage stock and members $110,819

 

3.   Community learning program resources for the book club tubs (450 tubs pa), the Storytime kits (40 kits pa), and baby bounce program $134,482

 

4.   Liaise directly with State Library NSW for library related policies and procedures.

 

In the transition period, Wagga City Library with the guidance of the State Library NSW would review library related policies and processes, noting this would not require any major changes. Continual update of policies and procedures would be undertaken by the Manager - Library Services on a regular basis in consultation with the State Library NSW as part of their substantive role.

 

There is no training or gaps analysis costs to be considered as the State Library NSW provides up to date information and support on any changes to library related polices as part of their role in supporting public library staff across NSW.

 

5.   Managing the eLibrary services contract including provision of eBooks, eAudio, eMagazines, discovery tools and hosting online databases on the WWCL website $82,432

 

6.   Submit the annual Bibliostat return direct to the State Library NSW and run our own crystal data reports.

 

Bibliostat statistics for State Library of NSW. This is ongoing recording of data by Program and Circulation staff – eg. member numbers, programs, visits, collection size, number of information requests, reservations filled, public internet usage. This task is currently undertaken by the current Program and Circulation staff so there would be no additional costs required to complete this work. The Systems Officer would collate and submit the annual Bibliostat data $3,604

 

7.   WWCL would become an independent member of the South West Zone Digital Library consortium $42,207

 

8.   Cost of delivering equivalent RRL services to current 5 villages of Humula, Ladysmith, Uranquinty, Collingullie and Tarcutta $38,454

 

*Based on a fortnightly service without programming for comparison with the RRL “collect and return” service.

 

Total upfront cost in first year (2022/23) is $830,007, to deliver items 1-8 above.

 

Total recurrent cost thereafter is:

 

Year

Recurrent cost

2023/24

$742,850

2024/25

$763,643

2025/26

$785,130

2026/27

$807,338

2027/28

$830,292

2028/29

$854,021

2029/30

$878,552

2030/31

$903,915

 

 

Additional Services to be provided

 

1.   In the Standalone model for the current 5 villages the service would be twice as frequent, being delivered weekly instead of fortnightly for an additional cost of $27,343.

 

2.   In addition to the ‘collect and return’ service provided by RRL, Wagga City Library would offer outreach programs to villages and suburbs.

 

3.   The Agile Service Officer’s salary includes the face to face delivery of the programs as per the Village Circuit Program table below. To enable direct comparison with the RRL service cost, the costs already identified above have been excluded from the table below. As a result, the table reflects only the additional costs to provide the additional services to the RRL service option.

 

Location

Program description

Material Unit Cost

Cost

Tarcutta, Humula, Ladysmith, Uranquinty

and Collingullie

30 x Storytime sessions per annum

 

6 sessions per village @ $18 per session

 

$540

 

10 x Tech Savvy Community classes per annum

2 sessions per village @$175 per session

$1,750

 

5 x Science/School Holiday Programs per annum

 1 session per village @ $108

$540

 

10 x Community Partnership programs in Community Legal, Health and Wellbeing per annum

2 sessions per village @ $10

$100

Total program materials

 

 

$2,930

 

In addition to increasing the service level to the 5 villages serviced by RRL to a weekly service instead of a fortnightly service, the Wagga City Library standalone option would increase the Wagga City Council service level in 2 further ways:

 

1.   Firstly, it is proposed that Wagga expand the village library service to the 4 villages of Oura, Mangoplah, Galore and Currawarna.  These villages which would receive the new weekly library service discussed above for the 5 villages that the RRL currently services fortnightly. 

 

The addition of these villages to the library services we offer would cost an additional $52,638 for vehicle, collections and staffing plus $5,274 in program material costs.

 

Location

Program description

Material Unit Cost

Cost

Oura, Mangoplah, Galore & Currawarna,

24 x Storytime sessions per annum

6 sessions per village @ $18 per session

 

$432

 

8 x Tech Savvy Community classes per annum

2 sessions per village @$175 per session

$1,400

 

4 x Science/School Holiday Programs per annum

1 session per village @ $108

$432

 

8 x Community Partnership programs in Community Legal, Health and Wellbeing per annum

2 sessions per village @ $10

$80

Total program materials

 

 

$2,344

 


 

 

2.   Secondly, it is proposed that the Wagga library service is expanded to direct service delivery in Wagga Wagga suburbs (which are not currently serviced at all by the RRL). In total it proposed that the remote service would be provided to 9 suburbs in Wagga. The additional costs for this new service initiative would be program costs of $7,326 ($814 per suburb) and vehicle, collections and staff costs $118,435, totalling $125,761. The Agile Service Officer’s salary includes the face to face delivery of the programs as described in the Suburban Circuit Program table below. These costings exclude the staff costs already listed above of which support the outreach programming.

 

Location

Program description

Material Unit Cost

Cost

Boorooma, Estella, Glenfield Park, Tolland, Ashmont, Mount Austin, Kooringal, Lake Albert and Turvey Park.

54 x Storytime sessions per annum

 

6 sessions per suburb @ $18 per session

 

$972

 

18 x Tech Savvy Community classes per annum

2 sessions per suburb @$175 per session

 

$3,150

 

9 x Science/School Holiday Programs per annum

1 session per suburb @ $108

$972

 

18 x Community Partnership programs in Community Legal, Health and Wellbeing per annum

2 sessions per suburb @ $80

$180

 

36 x Multicultural services – Language Café per annum

4 sessions per suburb @ $18

$648

 

36 x Baby Bounce sessions per annum

4 sessions per suburb @ $39

$1,404

Total program materials

 

 

$7,326

 

Also in addition to all the expanded library offerings identified above, it is also proposed that the services at the Civic Centre be expanded. Under the standalone model, additional services could be offered at the Civic Centre with expanded services offered across 7 days including:

 

·   Multicultural Services would be increased from 10 hours per week to 5 days per week for Language Café classes and commence targeted Storytime, homework, study groups, Tech Savvy Community multicultural sessions.

 

·   Additional resources for Storytime sessions targeted at new parents and carers (offered daily 5 days per week) and Baby Bounce x 40 sessions.

 

·   Commencement of regular facilitated after hours and weekend programming which includes additional salaries for staff to provide onsite homework, research and study help, coding, author talks, book clubs, music, creative, science and technology

 

Total $97,353

 

Cost Comparison

 

The cost adopted by RRL to provide the RRL services to Wagga City Library in 2022/23 is $1,158,181. If Wagga City Library was to deliver the equivalent RRL services (as described in points 1-8 on pages 1–3 in this document) and the additional services proposed (as described on pages 4-5 in this document) this would total $1,138,376 for 2022/23. On this basis, Council would be able to provide everything it currently receives from RRL, plus increasing the service level in the 5 villages by 100%, plus extending the service to 4 more villages, plus extending the service to 9 suburbs, plus increasing the services at the civic centre at a total saving of $19,805 compared to the RRL fee to provide the limited services offered by RRL. 

 

If Wagga City Library was to remain as part of the RRL service, under the proposed RRL model and with all services levels remaining status quo, the overall Wagga City Library would cost $2,446,600 for 2022/23.   This total includes a payment of $77, 271 paid by RRL to Wagga Council for providing the services of the executive council to the RRL.

 

The total proposed cost for the Wagga City Library to deliver a standalone library model is $2,491,466 for 2022/23. This would result in the standalone model costing an additional $44,866, with Council to provide the equivalent RRL services, current City Library services as well as new expanded services to the 9 rural villages, 9 suburban locations and increased services at the Civic Centre site.  If Wagga Council was not the executive Council to RRL the RRL cost in the previous paragraph would be $77,271 higher and so the standalone option would then be $32,405 cheaper than the RRL option.

 

You will note there is a discrepancy between the above paragraphs being a predicted $19,805 saving in the narrative in the first paragraph and slightly different saving of $32,405 in the narrative of the 3rd paragraph.  The reason for this difference is that it is proposed that some of the program costs could be covered from the library budget without being separately identified and raised and so the standalone option is likely to be slightly cheaper than the service by service cost breakdown  provided in the tables above.

 

Council has adopted LTFP allocation of $2,715,980 for 2022/23 for the Wagga City Library service. Attachment E provides the detailed costings of the standalone model.

 

These costs are based on prices sourced from vendor providers, charges listed in the RRL Management Plan 2020/21 and benchmarked against Albury City Library’s standalone service which is comparable to the size of the Wagga Wagga City Library and internal staff costings. See Attachment E for the details of these costings.

 

The standalone option is recommended by staff for WWCL to pursue post June 2022, as this represents a strong return on investment proposition to Council, residents and ratepayers living in the Wagga Wagga LGA.

 

It is recommended that Councillors provide In Principle Support for the Standalone Wagga Wagga City Library Service Option and a further report be provided to the 22 November 2021 Ordinary Council meeting to allow the incoming 2021 Council to ratify the 26 July Council resolution.

 

Financial Implications

The cost adopted by RRL to provide the RRL services to Wagga City Library in 2022/23 is estimated at $1,158,181. If Wagga City Library was to deliver the equivalent RRL services and the additional services proposed this would total $1,138,376 for 2022/23. On this basis, Council would be able to provide everything it currently receives from RRL, plus increasing the service level in the 5 villages by 100%, plus extending the service to 4 more villages, plus extending the service to 9 suburbs, plus increasing the services at the civic centre at a total saving of $19,805 compared to the RRL fee to provide the limited services offered by RRL. 

 

If Wagga City Library was to remain as part of the RRL service, under the proposed RRL model and with all services levels remaining status quo, the overall Wagga City Library would cost $2,446,600 for 2022/23. This total includes a payment of $77,271 paid by RRL to Wagga Council for providing the services of the executive council to the RRL.

 

The total proposed cost for the Wagga City Library to deliver a Standalone library model is $2,491,466 for 2022/23. This would result in the standalone model costing an additional $44,866, with Council to provide the equivalent RRL services, current City Library services as well as new expanded services to the 9 rural villages, 9 suburban locations and increased services at the Civic Centre site.  If Wagga Council was not the executive Council to RRL the RRL cost in the previous paragraph would be $77,271 higher and so the standalone option would then be $32,405 cheaper than the RRL option.

 

Council has an adopted LTFP allocation of $2,715,980 for 2022/23 for the Wagga City Library service. Adopting the standalone library model would save Council $224,514 in 2022/23. The confidential report on this matter details the costings for the Standalone Option 3 Library Service model.

Policy and Legislation

NSW Library Act 1939

Wagga Wagga City Council Cultural Plan 2020-2030

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Leadership and Collaboration

Objective: We have strong leadership

Outcome: We are accountable and transparent

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

Any risks for service option implementation will be addressed as part of project and service delivery risk management assessments and controls.

Internal / External Consultation

The options have been informed by previous community consultation and survey processes and engagement with Council’s Cultural Plan and the Library Review, engagement with Councillors, RRL Executive Director and RRL Advisory Committee meetings and resolutions, along with any relevant Wagga Wagga City Council resolutions.

 

 

 

 

  


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 26 July 2021

RP-13

 

RP-13           Annual Grants Program 2021/22 - Community Programs and Projects

Author:        Madeleine Scully 

Director:      Janice Summerhayes

        

 

Summary:

Council’s Annual Grants Program consists of ten grant categories:

Community Programs and Projects, Recreational Facilities, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Rural Halls, Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Local Heritage, Events, Natural Environment,

Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business. The program offers the opportunity for individuals, community groups and organisations to apply for funding for a range of programs and activities across the Local Government Area. The total amount of funding available in the 2021/22 financial year is $217,000 with an additional $7,400 unallocated and available in the Recreational Facilities category carry over request budget detailed in the Finance report within this business paper. This brings the total budget for the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program to $224,400.

 

This year the Annual Grants Program placed a priority on applications that demonstrated their event, project or program would contribute to decreasing social and community disadvantage in the neighbourhoods of Ashmont, Tolland, Mount Austin and Kooringal. This was in response to the Notice of Motion – Decreasing Social and Community Disadvantage report that was endorsed at the 28 September 2020 Ordinary Meeting of Council.

 

The annual grants application period opened on Monday 15 March 2021 and closed on Monday 17 May 2021. This report provides details regarding the Community Programs and Projects category for 2021/22.

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council approve the successful applications for the Community Programs and Projects Category of the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program as detailed in the report totalling $30,000.

 

Report

The Annual Grants 2021/22 program consists of ten grant categories; Arts, Culture and Creative Industries, Community Programs and Projects, Events, Local Heritage, Natural Environment, Neighbourhood and Rural Villages, Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls, Youth Led Initiatives and Small Business.

 

Each category is reported as a separate report to allow Councillors to consider pecuniary or non-pecuniary interests in each report and annual grants category.

 

An overall total of 111 applications were received for assessment in the Annual Grants Program 2021/22 with $224,400 available. The total amount of funding requested by the community across all categories was $549,889.

 

A total of seventeen applications were received in the 2021/22 Annual Grants Program – Community Programs and Projects category. Applications were assessed with the panel comprising of a Councillor, independent community representatives and staff. Panel members were Councillor Vanessa Keenan, Council’s Community Development Officer and an independent community representative, Laura Johnston.

 

Of the seventeen applications received, a total of $71,362 was requested with $30,000 available. Out of these applications nine applications were successful and recommended to be either fully funded or part funded. Eight applications were unsuccessful. The total amount of unallocated funds is $0. The following table details the successful applications received:

 

Organisation Name

Project Description

Funding Requested

Funding Approved

Reason for Funding

Carevan Wagga Incorporated

Purchase of Food Containers & Additional Equipment for Safe Transport of Food

$5,312

$514

Part funding recommended due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

Turvey Park Public School

Students from schools in the Wagga LGA to be able to access a refugee environmental hub at the Riverina Environmental Education Centre. The program will look to engage refugee students. The project would include parents, allowing families of school students of refugee background to engage meaningfully with schools, opening the door for parents to feel part of the school community and their child’s education.

$3,500

$3,500

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

 

NSW Service for the Treatment and Rehabilitation of Torture and Trauma Survivors

Multicultural Women’s Arts Group will be a weekly creative engagement program for women from refugee backgrounds. Through the workshops, women will engage in creative expression and share cultural and traditional arts practices from their multicultural backgrounds.

$4,900

$4,300

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

 

Afghan Hazara Community of Wagga Wagga

 

(Auspiced by the Multicultural Council of Wagga Wagga)

Host four events at times of cultural significance to promote intercultural dialogue, awareness, acceptance and learning creating opportunities to celebrate our local cultural diversity and promote unity within our region. The four events will be hosted to coincide with Eid al-Fitr, Eid al-Adha, Eid al-Ghadir and Nowruz (Persian New Year.)

$4,384

$4,384

Detailed application and inclusive of entire community with clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

 

Bluearth Foundation

‘Active Schools’ A program which will provide schools with access to a sustainable and evidence-based whole-body health and fitness program that includes physical and health literacy, activity, and mindfulness to create and foster a healthy active school community.

$5,000

$5,000

Detailed application and will teach skills for life. Clear objectives and outcomes. Recommended to be fully funded.

 

Wagga Women’s Health Centre

Meditation and mindfulness sessions. These free hour-long sessions will be facilitated by a professional meditation teacher and will be open to all clients and women (or anyone presenting as a woman) in the community.

$2,070

$2,070

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

Sunflower House Incorporated

A 5-month Art Program for Sunflower House members which includes expressive drawing, acrylic painting, portrait painting, clay sculpting and mural painting

$5,000

$5,000

Detailed application with clear objectives and outcomes.   Recommended to be fully funded.

 

Wagga Derby Dolls Incorporated aka Riverina Rollers

Purchase protective equipment, three hit pads for training and roller skates to offset the initial cost of joining roller derby. The equipment is very expensive and is often a barrier to people who would otherwise join.

$4,100

$1,832

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

Bespoke Fashion Inc

The project will help meet the demands for basic sewing skills and knowledge in the Wagga Wagga LGA through no cost classes.

$4,930

$3,400

Part funding due to amount of funding available in this category and the number of applications received. Application indicates they are willing to accept part funding.

 

TOTAL    

$39,196

$30,000

 

 

Please see attached for reference a table of unsuccessful applications.

All categories in the Annual Grants program 2021/22 were oversubscribed, except for the Recreational Facilities, Rural Halls and Natural Environment categories.

Financial Implications