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Agenda and
Business Paper

 


Ordinary Meeting of Council

 

 

 

To be held on
Monday 21 November 2022

at 6:00pm

 

 

 

Civic Centre cnr Baylis and Morrow Streets,
Wagga Wagga NSW 2650 (PO Box 20)
P 1300 292 442
P council@wagga.nsw.gov.au


wagga.nsw.gov.au


NOTICE OF MEETING

 

The proceedings of all Council meetings in open session, including all debate and addresses by the public, are recorded (audio visual) and livestreamed on Council’s website including for the purpose of facilitating community access to meetings and accuracy of the Minutes.

 

In addition to webcasting council meetings, audio recordings of confidential sessions of Ordinary Meetings of Council are also recorded, but do not form part of the webcast.

 

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WAGGA WAGGA CITY COUNCILLORS

 

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STATEMENT OF ETHICAL OBLIGATIONS

Councillors are reminded of their Oath or Affirmation of Office made under Section 233A of the Local Government Act 1993 and their obligation under Council’s Code of Conduct to disclose and appropriately manage Conflicts of Interest.

 

QUORUM

The quorum for a meeting of the Council is a majority of the Councillors of the Council who hold office for the time being who are eligible to vote at the meeting.

 


Reports submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council to be held on Monday 21 November 2022.

Ordinary Meeting of Council AGENDA AND BUSINESS PAPER

Monday 21 November 2022

ORDER OF BUSINESS:

CLAUSE               PRECIS                                                                                                      PAGE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY                                                                                   3

REFLECTION                                                                                                                         3

APOLOGIES                                                                                                                          3

Confirmation of Minutes

CM-1           ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 7 NOVEMBER 2022                                        3

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST                                                                                            3

Mayoral Minutes

MM-1           MAYORAL MINUTE - Declaration of Statewide Road Emergency                4

Reports from Staff

RP-1            Review of determination of development consent DA21/0839 - Self Storage Units - 43 Guttler Street, Uranquinty.                                 10

RP-2            Mobile Food Vendor trading in public places’ Policy (POL 062)                15

RP-3            RESPONSE TO NOTICE OF MOTION - WAGGA WAGGA ROADS                      40

RP-4            Response to Notice of Motion - Verteran's Employment at Wagga Wagga City Council                                                                                     61

RP-5            DRAFT INNOVATE RECONCILIATION ACTION PLAN 2022-2024                       64

RP-6            Presentation of the 2021/22 Financial Statements                            70

RP-7            POL 075 - Investment Policy                                                                        72

RP-8            FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE REPORT AS AT 31 OCTOBER 2022                      86

RP-9            REQUESTS FOR FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE                                                       122

RP-10          LICENCE AGREEMENT - 49 SHAW STREET, WAGGA WAGGA                         128

RP-11          RESOLUTIONS AND NOTICES OF MOTIONS REGISTERS                                 130

RP-12          QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE                                                                                204    

Confidential Reports

CONF-1       COUNCIL CLEAN UP - 32 TICHBOURNE CRESCENT KOORINGAL NSW 2650             209

CONF-2       RE-DETERMINATION OF ORGANISATION STRUCTURE                                   210

CONF-3       RFT2023-11 PROVISION OF SECURITY SERVICES                                            211

CONF-4       PROPOSED LEASE - CANTEEN AT LIVESTOCK MARKETING CENTRE (LMC)            212

CONF-5       EXPRESSION OF INTEREST - RIVERSIDE FOOD VAN LICENCE                       213

CONF-6       ASSIGNMENT OF AIRPORT HANGAR SUB-LEASE - HANGAR SITES 225, 227 & 301, WAGGA WAGGA AIRPORT                                                                                214

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY

Wagga Wagga City Council acknowledges the traditional custodians of the land, the Wiradjuri people, and pays respect to Elders past, present and future and extends our respect to all First Nations Peoples in Wagga Wagga.

We recognise and respect their cultural heritage, beliefs and continuing connection with the land and rivers. We also recognise the resilience, strength and pride of the Wiradjuri and First Nations communities

 

 

RELECTION

Councillors, let us in silence reflect upon our responsibilities to the community which we represent, and to all future generations and faithfully, and impartially, carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in us, to the best of our skill and judgement.

 

 

APOLOGIES

 

 

Confirmation of Minutes

CM-1              ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 7 NOVEMBER 2022       

Recommendation

That the Minutes of the proceedings of the Ordinary Council Meeting held on 7 November 2022 be confirmed as a true and accurate record.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

Minutes - 7 November 2022

215

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

MM-1

 

Mayoral Minute

MM-1              MAYORAL MINUTE - Declaration of Statewide Road Emergency

       

 

Summary:

Consideration to support and endorse the Local Government NSW declaration of Statewide Road Emergency.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council joins with Local Government NSW and Country Mayors Association of NSW in declaring a Statewide Road Emergency.

 

 

Report

We are all well aware the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area has been hit by a seemingly relentless wave of rain and flood events in the past 12 months.

And we are not alone. A total of 126 of New South Wales’ 128 local government areas have had natural disaster declarations within the last 12 months.

On 3 November 2022, Local Government NSW declared a Statewide Roads Emergency.

The declaration – and urgent call for the NSW and Federal governments to increase their existing road funding commitments in the wake of the floods – comes on the back of an estimated $2.5 billion in road damages and a collapse of the local and regional road network.

I call on Wagga Wagga City Council to show our support for this move and whole-heartedly endorse the Local Government NSW declaration of a Statewide Road Emergency.

The declaration has already been publicly supported by our peak regional body, the Country Mayors Association of New South Wales.

As part of the Statewide Roads Emergency, Local Government NSW and the Country Mayors Association are calling for:

·      An acceleration and significant increase in funding for the $1.1 billion Fixing Local Roads and Fixing Country Bridges program from the New South Wales Government

·      A boost to Road Block Grant funding to compensate for the damage to the regional road network from the Federal Government

·      New funding to provide councils with plant machinery and skilled workers to expedite road repairs from the Federal Government.

We have faced, and may continue to face, an unprecedented and unrelenting series of natural disasters that has seen residents and business owners cleaning up again and again, people isolated, workers unable to get to work, and students unable to get to training or school.

Add to this our very real and immediate concern for our primary producers.

This latest rain event has hit at a critical time. Winter crops are ready to be harvested and the window for planting summer crops, including cotton, only lasts a matter of week. Cotton is the single largest contributor to our agricultural outputs.

Livestock are ready to go to sale.

The local and regional road network is critically enabling infrastructure. It is absolutely vital to our primary producers, and the key to keeping affordable food on the table across New South Wales and beyond.

Our road network, and the road network of shires across the state, have disastrous damage. We are facing a task that is beyond the reasonable scope of any local government authority. We face an unprecedented disaster that requires an unprecedented response.

We need help. Our community needs help. Other regional and rural communities across the state and beyond need help. We desperately need our leaders to lead.

We need to support our peak bodies in their declaration of Statewide Road Emergency.

This is an emergency, and it is time to seek help, and by supporting this Mayoral Minute you are endorsing that I write to the Prime Minister of Australian Anthony Albanese and the Premier of New South Wales Dominic Perrottet pleading for immediate action.

Financial Implications

N/A

Policy and Legislation

N/A

Link to Strategic Plan

Growing Economy

Objective: Wagga Wagga is a thriving, innovative and connected regional capital city

Improve, maintain and renew transport networks and building infrastructure to provide safe, affordable, efficient, and reliable transport connections for our community

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

N/A

Internal / External Consultation

Australia Local Government Association (ALGA)

Country Mayors Association



 

Attachments

 

1.

ALGA President’s Report to Country Mayors Association of NSW - 18 November 2022

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

MM-1

 

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Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

RP-1

 

Reports from Staff

RP-1               Review of determination of development consent DA21/0839 - Self Storage Units - 43 Guttler Street, Uranquinty.

Author:                        Paul O’Brien   

General Manager:    Peter Thompson

         

 

Summary:

Development Application DA21/0839 for the development of self-storage units at 43 Guttler Street, Uranquinty, was determined by way of refusal at the Ordinary Meeting of Council held on 8 August 2022.

 

The applicant has submitted an application to review this determination under Division 8.2 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (the Act). 

 

The application for review has been referred to and assessed by an independent and qualified town planning consultant. The consultant’s report on the review is provided as an attachment to this report.

 

The consultant recommends that that Council resolve to not change its original determination to refuse the development application.

 

 

 

Recommendation

It is recommended that Council confirm its original determination to refuse Development Application DA21/0839 for the development of self-storage units at 43 Guttler Street, Uranquinty.

 

 

Development Application Details

 

Applicant

Camilla Rocks

Owner

Fairview Riverina Pty Ltd

Directors: Joshua Eldridge and Paul Mulholland

Development Cost

$275,000

Development Description

Self-Storage Units (26 units)

 

Report

Development Application DA21/0839 for the development of self-storage units at 43 Guttler Street, Uranquinty, was determined by way of refusal at the Ordinary Meeting of Council held on 8 August 2022. The following reasons were given by Council for refusal of the application:

·    The proposed development is not consistent with the objectives of the RU5 Village zoning as outlined in the Wagga Wagga LEP 2010.

·    The proposed development conflicts with the residential amenity of the village as outlined in the Wagga Wagga DCP 2010.

The applicant has submitted an application to review this determination under Division 8.2 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (the Act). Under this division of the Act, the review of a determination made by the Council is to be conducted by the Council and not by a delegate. After conducting its review of the determination, Council may confirm or change the determination.

 

Council’s original determination was made against the recommendation of staff who recommended approval of the application subject to conditions. Given the previous recommendation for approval from staff, the application for review has been referred to and assessed by an independent and qualified town planning consultant. All relevant information in relation to the original application and the application for review was provided to the consultant for their consideration. This included submitted plans and documents, copies of public submissions, original staff assessment reports, Council meeting minutes and resolution.

 

Nineteen public submissions (18 in objection) were received in relation to the original Development Application. From 23 September to 11 October 2022, the application for review was notified to adjoining and nearby property owners plus all persons who made an original submission. Six submissions (5 in objection) were received in response to the application for review. Both the original and additional (new) submissions are provided as an attachment to this report.

 

The consultant’s report on the review is provided in full as an attachment to this report. The following extracts from the report summarise the consultant’s conclusion and recommendation:

 

The assessment supports the decision of Council to refuse the development application for the reasons stated. Further, the assessment finds significant deficiencies and inconsistencies in the development application that should have been addressed by the applicant. Some of these issues were identified in the assessment report prepared by Council staff and conditions of consent were recommended to address these issues. However, I am not satisfied that the conditions are sufficient to overcome the deficiencies in the application or the potential impacts of the development.

 

It is noted that the applicant did not take the opportunity to address these issues in the review request by for example providing a detailed landscaping plan to demonstrate how the development will be adequately screened from the Olympic Highway and adjoining properties.

 

It is therefore recommended that Council resolve to not change its original determination to refuse the development application.

 

 

 

 

Site Location

 

Subject site is Lot 11 under Deposited Plan 1267696 and generally known as 43 Guttler Street, Uranquinty. The site is a battle axe allotment that is 2024m2 and rectangular in shape with a 6m wide panhandle access driveway to Guttler Street. It is noted that the site has a principle frontage to the Olympic Highway on the northwest boundary, however no access is proposed from this frontage.

 

The surrounding locality is a village area with approved dwellings either under construction or established on the adjoining lots to the southeast and southwest. The subject site is bounded by the Olympic Highway to the northwest and adjoins undeveloped land (former Uranquinty Caravan Park) to the northeast.

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Financial Implications

N/A

Policy

Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010

Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010

 

Link to Strategic Plan

The Environment

Objective: Future growth and development of Wagga Wagga is planned for in a sustainable manner

Ensure sustainable urban development

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

Confirming Council’s original decision to refuse the application may result in an appeal process in the Land and Environment Court which will have to be defended by Council. The original reasons for refusal will have to be justified and withstand scrutiny and cross examination in Court.

Internal / External Consultation

Full details of the consultation that was carried out as part of the development application assessment is contained in the attached s4.15 Report.

 

 

Mail

Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news story

Council News advert

Media releases

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meetings

Your Say website

Community meetings

Stakeholder workshops

Drop-in sessions

Surveys and feedback forms

Social media

Email newsletters

Website

Digital advertising

TIER

Consult

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

x

 

Involve

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

DA210839.01 - Independent Assessment Report - Provided under separate cover

 

2.

DA210839.01 - Statement of Environmental Effects and Plans - Provided under separate cover

 

3.

DA210839 - Notice of Determination - Refusal - Provided under separate cover

 

4.

DA210839 - Original Section 4.15 Assessment Report - Provided under separate cover

 

5.

DA210839.01 - Redacted (new) submissions - Provided under separate cover

 

6.

DA210839 - Redacted (original) submissions - Provided under separate cover

 

7.

DA210839.01 - Unredacted (new) submissions

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as it deals with: personnel matters concerning particular individuals. - Provided under separate cover

 

8.

DA210839 - Unredacted (original) submissions

This matter is considered to be confidential under Section 10A(2) of the Local Government Act 1993, as it deals with: personnel matters concerning particular individuals. - Provided under separate cover

 

  


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

RP-2

 

RP-2               Mobile Food Vendor trading in public places’ Policy (POL 062)

Author:         Ben Creighton 

Executive:    John Sidgwick

         

 

Summary:

This report advises Council on the outcome of the public exhibition process for the draft Mobile Food Vendor Trading in Public Places’ Policy (POL 062). The Mobile Food Vendor Trading in Public Places’ Policy (POL 062) is presented to Council for endorsement, following public exhibition.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a       note that there were eight (8) public submissions received during the exhibition period for the draft Mobile Food Vendor Trading in Public Places’ Policy (POL 062)

b       adopt the Mobile Food Vendor Trading in Public Places’ Policy (POL 062)

 

Report

Council resolved on 8 August 2022 to place the draft Mobile Food Vendor Trading in Public Places’ Policy (POL 062) on public exhibition for a period of 28 days from 9 August 2022 to 5 September 2022 and invite public submissions until the 19 September 2022 on the draft Policy.

 

During the submission period, 8 public submissions were received. The submissions received had a variety of viewpoints as summarised below:

 

Submission Summary

Comment

1.

Supportive of expansion of Mobile Food Van program. Adds to the vibrancy of Wagga Wagga.

Noted

 

2

Supportive of increasing the number of van permits particularly for coffee vans.

Noted

 

3

In support of increasing number of permits, believes that 20 is not enough.

Raising the number by five (5) to 20 permits allows the expansion of the program while protecting the interests of existing businesses (both bricks and mortar and other mobile food vendors).

4

Supportive of increasing number of permits and extending the permit duration. Would also prefer that 30 or 40 permits were available to encourage a food culture around the city.

Raising the number by five (5) to 20 permits allows the expansion of the program while protecting the interests of existing businesses (both bricks and mortar and other mobile food vendors).

5

Against the increase as local hospitality businesses are already struggling and that adding more competition to the current market could be detrimental to existing businesses.

Raising the number by five (5) to 20 permits allows the expansion of the program while protecting the interests of existing businesses (both bricks and mortar and other food vans). 

The policy also prevents mobile food vendors from operating within 200m of an existing food service.

6

Submission from the owner of the Tarcutta Hotel, supports the local food van operator at Tarcutta however requests that the van only operates after 8.00pm.

Discussion regarding this issue have been undertaken with the existing mobile food vendor at Tarcutta.

An EOI for the operation of a mobile food van at the Tarcutta truck Interchange has been released and will require the licence holder to not begin prior to 8pm.

7

Strong support for increasing the number of permits and suggests a continual review of the number of permits to meet the demand from the community. Submission also outlined the below.

i. Preference to local vendors

Noted

ii.    Vehicles over 7.5m require a road occupancy permit, this needs to be amended to “may require”.

Vehicles over 7.5m are regulated in their activities by the State Government.

iii.   Proximity to comparable premises, vans should be able to operate out of the comparable businesses operating hours. Comparable premises should also be defined more clearly as selling different items to bricks and mortar establishment will not take away business from the establishment.

Raising the number by five (5) to 20 permits while restricting the hours of operation and proximity to other businesses will allow the expansion of the program while protecting the interests of existing businesses (both bricks and mortar and other food vans).

 

iv.   Permit days and hours need to be broadened or removed as there is a need for quality food and beverages for truck drivers and travellers.

v.    Signage Menu boards – allowing “A” frame menu boards if they are near the food vehicle, clearly visible and pose no obstruction to any person or vehicle.

The mobile food vendor vehicles are required to be self-contained and not have external obstructions that could present a risk to other vehicles of community members.

vi.   Restricted trading at Wagga Beach and Tarcutta Changeover Bay, these locations should not be licenced to one entity as the public tire of the same vendor, that all interested parties that wish to operate out of these areas could possibly operate on a roster system, with a working group set up to work through the details.

These sites have been identified as suitable for single operator agreements due to the utilisation of the respective sites by the public on a commercial basis.

 

8

In support – operates out of Tarcutta and would like the permit duration extended to two years.

Noted

 

It is recommended that Council adopt the Mobile Food Vendor Trading in Public Places’ Policy (POL 062) as exhibited.

Financial Implications

It is expected the changes will generate an additional $2,025 of income per year from the issuing of the additional 5 licences.

Policy and Legislation

POL 062 – Mobile Food Vendors Trading in Public Places

Link to Strategic Plan

Community leadership and collaboration

Objective: Wagga Wagga has strong community leadership and a shared vision for the future

Plan long term for the future of Wagga Wagga

Risk Management Issues for Council

Risks associated with the operation of the Mobile Food Van program include Work Health & Safety risk associated with the operation, enforcement of regulations and reputational risk associated with the perception of impact on bricks and mortar businesses.

Internal / External Consultation

The draft Mobile Food Vendor Trading in Public Places’ Policy (POL 062) has been reviewed internally by staff and Council’s Executive Team.

 

The draft policy was endorsed by Council on 8 August 2022 and placed on public exhibition for a period of 28 days from 28 days from 9 August 2022 to 5 September 2022, with submissions open until the 19 September 2022.

 

 

Mail

Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news story

Council News advert

Media releases

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meetings

Your Say website

Community meetings

Stakeholder workshops

Drop-in sessions

Surveys and feedback forms

Social media

Email newsletters

Website

Digital advertising

TIER

Consult

 

 

 

x

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

x

x

 

Involve

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

Submissions

 

2.

Mobile Food Vendor Trading in Public Places (Parks and Reserves) POL 062

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

RP-2

 

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Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

RP-2

 

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Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

RP-3

 

RP-3               RESPONSE TO NOTICE OF MOTION - WAGGA WAGGA ROADS

Author:                        Warren Faulkner 

         

 

Summary:

This report outlines all relevant information regarding maintenance and repair of the Wagga Wagga road network as requested by Council and recommends that Council undertake workshops to consider and develop funding strategies to provide increased funding for roads maintenance and renewal as well as address the backlog of works.  

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a      receive and note the information provided in the report

b      undertake a series of workshops leading up to the 2023/24 budget workshops to develop funding strategies to close the maintenance and renewal gap as well as the backlog works for roads infrastructure

 

Report

Council at its meeting held on 10 January 2022 (22/0009) resolved as follows:

That Council receive a Report outlining all relevant information in regard to road maintenance and repair, including but not limited to:

a       current budget and comparison to other similar local government areas

b       current schedule of repairs

c        funding required and alternate options for funding

d       funding received from other levels of government

e       rating system for assessing Wagga Wagga roads and the process of designating priority repairs, maintenance, and upgrades

f         overview of the main causes of potholes within our Local Government Area

g       overview of current materials and methods used to repair potholes (including costings) and an investigation into the cost of alternative materials and methods which could be more durable, and long-lasting

h       challenges unique to Wagga Wagga in road maintenance

i         at the conclusion of the report, forward to State and Federal members for comment and/or support

j         explore new machinery and products to amend and properly repair potholes

k        investigate the use of contractors to tender for major roadworks to reduce the timeframes for upgrades and total costs

 


 

Current information in response to each item is presented as follows:

 

(a)     Current budget and comparison to other similar local government areas

Council’s 2022/23 budget for roads as at 1 November 2022 in the Wagga Wagga LGA is as follows:

 

Sealed Roads

Unsealed Roads

Total

Maintenance

$4,390,410

$1,817,363

$6,207,773

Renewal

$12,405,480

$1,827,738

$14,233,218

    Subtotal Maintenance & Renewal

$17,012,665

$3,645,101

$20,440,991

Upgrades

$14,798,720

$2,159,307

$16,958,027

Total

$31,811,385

$5,804,408

$37,399,018

 

In October of each year, Council’s in NSW are required to submit a “National Local Roads Data Return” to the Office of Local Government that captures information on what Council’s maintenance and renewal expenditure on roads was for the previous financial year.

 

The latest available information on the OLG website to be able to compare Wagga Wagga City Council’s budget/expenditure to is the 2020/21 Performance Statistics. 

 

The following table provides the NSW Group 4 (Regional Town/City) Council road data for comparison purposes.  The table is sorted from highest to lowest of the ‘Total Road Length’ of each Council.  

 

The table shows that Wagga Wagga City Council is in the top five Council’s for length of road network, however our total expenditure on roads, bridges and footpaths as a percentage spend of our budget is in the bottom five of the 26 Regional Town/City Council’s. 

It should be noted that the last five columns are the Asset Management Key Performance Indicators for all of Council’s assets, not just roads.  However, given roads are our largest asset category, the figures give an indication of how Council is managing its road asset network, in particular noting that we have the highest infrastructure backlog ratio of the Regional Town/City Council’s which is calculated by dividing the estimated cost to bring our assets to a satisfactory condition by the total written down value of the assets.

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

RP-3

 

Wagga City Council’s budget/expenditure to is the 2020/2021 Performance Statistics:

 



 


(b)     Current schedule of repairs

The 2022/23 schedule of repairs (renewals and upgrades) for roads as at 1 November 2022 is as follows.

 

Renewals

 

Pavement Rehabilitation Program

Road/Segment

Budget

Timing

Inglewood Road - from Mitchell Road east for 2.4km

$1,296,000

January - February 2023

Copland Street - Blaxland to Tasman Road (1.2km)

$871,200

February 2023

Macleay Street - Erin to Urana Streets (720m)

$816,120

January 2023

Nagle Street - from Sturt Highway south for 550m

$561,830

March 2023

Bourke Street - Red Hill Road to Holbrook Road (900m)

$652,000

March - April 2023

Lloyd Road - Holbrook Road to Plumpton Road (2.4km)

$1,309,266

February - March 2023

Bomen Road - Ch:1km to 1.6km from Olympic Hwy

$1,050,700

March – April 2023

Mitchell Road – Brunskill to Inglewood (850m)

$700,000

January – March 2023

Watson Boulevard – Red Hill Road to Roundabout

$509,120

April 2023

 

Urban Asphalt Program

Road/Segment

Budget

Timing

Trail/Gurwood Roundabout

$242,375

February 2023

Trail/Johnson Roundabout

$287,525

February 2023

Glenfield/Fernleigh Roundabout

$375,900

February 2023

 

Bitumen Resealing Program

Road Name/Length of Seal

Budget

Timing

NORTH WAGGA

Dunn Street - 135m

$13,713

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Frederick Street - 172m

$18,600

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Gardiner Street - 465m

$39,063

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Marah Street - 740m

$32,940

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Stevenson Street - 240m

$16,600

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Wall Street - 440m

$36,400

Dec 2022 - April 2023

BOURKELANDS

 

Red Hill Road – 850m

$46,057

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Balala Crescent - 470m

$26,300

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Bedervale Street - 545m

$23,438

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Brooklyn Drive - 84m

$19,704

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Clifton Street - 560m

$25,400

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Glandore Street - 150m

$7,875

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Marylands Way - 480m

$29,200

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Pooginook Place - 230m

$10,475

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Tocal Street - 84m

$6,360

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Weerona Street - 92m

$23,152

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Yarrawah Street - 550m

$32,000

Dec 2022 - April 2023

KOORINGAL

 

Stanley Street – 880m

$49,500

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Acacia Street - 262m

$10,742

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Brown Street - 60m

$5,460

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Canna Street - 220m

$13,800

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Cochrane Street - 293m

$17,013

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Grove Street (Meadow to Wilson) - 230m

$14,315

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Meadow Street (Grove to Lake Albert) - 110m

$9,455

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Simkin Crescent - 750m

$55,750

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Waratah Street - 250m

$15,125

Dec 2022 - April 2023

TOLLAND

 

Bavaria Street - 332m

$13,280

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Oiowa Street - 90m

$6,600

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Kansas Drive - 165m

$29,240

Dec 2022 - April 2023

McCoullough Drive - 130m

$32,280

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Miller Street - 255m

$74,280

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Nixon Crescent - 432m

$17,360

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Ries Crescent - 205m

$33,405

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Roosevelt Avenue - 280m

$26,200

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Temerloh Street - 465m

$28,600

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Tolland Close - 325m

$19,600

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Topeka Street - 125m

$20,000

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Truman Avenue - 363m

$14,883

Dec 2022 - April 2023

MOUNT AUSTIN

 

Northcott Parade – 520m

$28,782

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Fernleigh Road - 235m

$9,275

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Hely Avenue - 100m

$9,150

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Hunter Street - 395m

$21,393

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Wren Street - 415m

$21,600

Dec 2022 - April 2023

TURVEY PARK

 

Blamey Street - 235m

$14,400

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Coleman Street - 375m

$27,500

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Dalton Street - 320m

$18,600

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Young Street - 300m

$14,750

Dec 2022 - April 2023

ASHMONT

 

Ashmont Avenue - 510m

$32,950

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Derna Place - 85m

$8,400

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Madang Street - 235m

$14,988

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Tedder Street - 175m

$17,000

Dec 2022 - April 2023

SAN ISIDORE

 

Kapooka Road - 1750m

$58,375

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Eugene Ave - 1060m

$34,150

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Henschke Avenue - 910m

$32,300

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Norman Duck Avenue - 650m

$24,500

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Bermingham Avenue - 300m

$14,000

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Michael Avenue - 675m

$25,250

Dec 2022 - April 2023

WAGGA WAGGA

 

Biroomba Lane (Morgan to Edward) - 300m

$14,250

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Darlow Street – 300m

$16,304

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Church Street - 190m

$36,625

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Cross Street - 166m

$34,940

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Johnston Street - 200m

$67,500

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Kincaid Street (Fitzmaurice to Trail) - 175m

$107,375

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Lewisham Avenue - 195m

$7,800

Dec 2022 - April 2023

North Parade - 300m

$72,960

Dec 2022 - April 2023

HUMULA

 

Creek Street - 400m

$15,000

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Tarcutta Street - 285m

$12,125

Dec 2022 - April 2023

RURAL ROADS

 

Arajoel Road - 1500m

$82,500

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Oura Road - 2500m

$127,500

Dec 2022 - April 2023

REGIONAL ROADS

 

Coolamon Road - 3000m

$185,000

Dec 2022 - April 2023

Holbrook Road - 3500m

$257,500

Dec 2022 - April 2023

 

Heavy Patching Program

Road/Segment

Budget

Timing

Avocet Drive

$173,880

January - March 2023

Copland Street / Tasman Road Intersection

$126,000

January - March 2023

Dalman Parkway / Pinaroo Drive Intersection

$360,000

January - March 2023

The Esplanade / Best Street Intersection

$326,974

January - March 2023

Byrnes Road

$250,000

January - March 2023

Tumbarumba Road

$241,391

January - March 2023

 

Gravel Resheeting Program

 

The gravel resheeting program will be discussed with the Council at the proposed workshops given the declaration of natural disaster events for the flooding events that are unfolding and the likelihood of funding for disaster restoration works being received.

 


 

Upgrades

 

Road/Segment

Budget*

Timing

Dunns Road Upgrade

$6,846,545

On-going – July 2023

Gregadoo Road Upgrade - Plumpton to Plunket

$2,816,713

Jun 2023 - Feb 2024

Lord Baden Powel Drive - Maclaey Street to Museum

$2,564,090

Feb 2023 - Jun 2023

Old Narrandera Rd Sealing - Deepwater Rd to LGA boundary

$2,159,307

Jan 2023 - Apr 2023

Old Narrandera Rd Upgrade - Olympic Hwy to Pine Gully Rd

$2,148,763

Mar 2023 - Jun 2023

Bakers Lane - From Sturt Highway south for approx. 180m

$422,609

Feb 2023 - Mar 2023

 *This is budget for current 2022/23 financial year only, and does not reflect multi-year budgets.

 

(c)     Funding required and alternate options for funding

 

The 2020/21 Performance Statistics noted earlier in section a) indicate an annual maintenance and renewal gap of approximately $9M.  These figures are based on dated information, prior to the last two (2) years of significant wet weather, and the subsequent deterioration of the roads network.

 

As part of Australian Accounting Standard - AASB 116 Property, Plant and Equipment, asset categories are required to be revalued every three (3) to five (5) years.  The roads asset category is being revalued this financial year.  This data will provide up to date condition information which will inform the estimated annual funding gap.

 

The estimated significant shortfall in funding which is evidenced by the condition of the Wagga Wagga local government area road network, means that the roads are not able to be maintained and renewed at a rate that provides a steady level of service holistically.  Each year that a shortfall in roads maintenance and renewal funding is maintained, this not only adds to the rate of deterioration of the network, but also creates an infrastructure backlog.  That is, the funding gap accumulates and more significant investment in funds is required to bring the network back up to the acceptable standard.  The current infrastructure backlog identified in the Report on infrastructure assets as at 30 June 2022 (previously called Special Schedule 7) of the 2021/22 Annual Financial Statements for sealed roads in the Wagga Wagga LGA is $91.959m.

 

There are a number of options that will be discussed in workshops with Councillors. These include but are not limited to a Special Rate Variation, additional grants, diverting revenue, realistic alternative revenue streams etc.

 

 


 

(d)     Funding received from other levels of government

The current funding for roads that is being received from State and Federal Governments as at the 1 November 2022 for the 2022/23 financial year is as follows:

 

Recurrent Funding

State Government

Federal Government

Grant Name

Funding

Grant Name

Funding

BLOCK Grant Assistance to Council for Regional Roads

$2,123,000

Financial Assistance Grant

$3,514,015

Roads to Recovery

$2,050,700

 

Non-Recurrent Funding

State Government

Federal Government

Grant Name

Funding

Grant Name

Funding

Fixing Local Roads Round 3

(Old Narrandera Road Seal)

$1,668,750

Special Grants program (Dunns Road)

$5,804,356

BBRF Round 4 (Lord Baden Powell Drive)

$4,288,879

Regional Roads REPAIR Program

(Bourke Street - Red Hill Road to Holbrook)

$326,000

Local Roads Community Infrastructure

$4,101,700

Blackspot Program (Humula Road)

$358,050

 

(e)     Rating system for assessing Wagga Wagga roads and the process of designating priority repairs, maintenance, and upgrades

 

Wagga City Council use the Risk Based Defect Priority Scoring System that is recommended for use by Local Government when reporting reactive defects.  The scoring system rates the pavement defect and in accordance with Council’s inspection framework a timeframe is assigned with Council’s response times.  Table 20 of the Asset Management Plan for Transport Assets 2022-2026 gives an overview of the process Council officers follow.

 

The data is collected in the field via handheld software (tablet).  Furthermore, Council also use this framework for customer requests to ensure requests are carried out in a timely manner in accordance with the road priority ranking system created.  This reactive maintenance also feeds into Council’s data set for building long term operational road works programs.  


 

Council’s Reactive Maintenance Response Times for Priority Repairs

 

Council’s road hierarchy is made up of Regional, Sub-Arterial, Collector, Local Major, Laneway and Urban roads. Council’s asset surveillance team also take into consideration the functional road classification or asset hierarchy to help determine the priority ranking for repair, maintenance and upgrades. 

Table

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Source: Transport Asset Management Plan (2022-2026)

 

Council also carry out proactive network surveillance using a road network inspection. This surveillance method helps Council determine the priority for maintenance programs for example (reseals, cracking sealing, etc) and renewals (road rehabilitation, heavy patching, etc). 

 


 

For priority ranking, Council utilise a variety of assessment methods and have in the past had visual network surveillance and laser scanning (non-subjective) carried out on the road network.  It should be noted all methods require field validation to calibrate the findings for future program of works.

 

Once Council have reviewed and validated the data for the roads, the information is stored in Council’s Asset Management System (Assetic).  Although data is recorded and stored in Assetic, further inspection and validation is required to build the road programs based on the condition rating. 

 

Traditionally, a defect condition ranking from 1-5 is assigned to a road segment for higher level maintenance activities, 1 being excellent and 5 being very poor.  To put this into context a very poor rating (5) would generally require road rehabilitation and an average condition rating (3) would require a reseal.  An excellent condition rating (1) requires no works.  A good condition rating (2) requires maintenance works in the near future if we are looking to reseal the wearing course in 7 years for example. 

 

The proposed road program is then assigned a high-level cost, in line with Council’s Long Term Financial Plan and operationally a yearly priority program is created. The backlog of data for roads that are not funded in the financial year are placed in future works road programs.

 

High Level Asset Condition Data Assessment

Table

Description automatically generated

Source : Transport Asset Management Plan (2022-2026)

 

Council currently follow the Asset Management Plan for Transport 2022-2026, however in conjunction with State-wide Mutual, we are working on refining the document to align a Road Maintenance Management Plan (RMMP) in line with Council’s Continual Improvement Plan. This plan is supported by State-wide Mutual, Local Government NSW and Institute of Public Works Engineering Australasia (IPWEA).

 

In summary, the RMMP will take a risk-based approach to managing defects, programming and intervention levels that is recognised as Best Practice for local government.  The new RMMP will ensure Council is following Best Practice in line with a consistent approach when dealing with defects, priorities and programmed works.

 

(f)      Overview of the main causes of potholes within our Local Government Area

The main cause of a pothole on a sealed road is a crack in the asphalt or bitumen surface that allows water to enter into the underlying layer of gravel during wet weather, leading to softening and weakening the gravel layer under the crack.  An example of typical cracking can be seen in the following photo.

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When vehicles drive over the crack following rain and because the gravel underneath the bitumen or asphalt is now somewhat softened and weakened, the pavement deflects and rebounds more under the traffic loading and in doing so it ‘pumps’ the finer materials out of the gravel layer through the crack and onto the road surface.  This is the onset of a pothole and as the pavement is now compromised at this location, the more vehicles that pass over this crack, the more the pavement unravels, and the pothole continues to grow in size until intervention (filling or repair of it) occurs.  It follows that the formation of potholes is then more likely to occur on roads that carry heavier vehicles and higher volumes of traffic, which is what is observed on our road network following wet weather.

The asphalt or bitumen layer is known as the wearing surface.  One of its functions is to provide waterproofing to the underlying layers of gravel.  The gravel under the wearing course is known as the pavement and its function is to provide the strength (bearing capacity) to carry the vehicle loading.  When a new road is constructed, the maximum bearing capacity of the gravel material is achieved, and it is sealed to protect it from water.  If, however the water-proofing function of the seal is compromised and water enters the pavement layer, then the bearing capacity of the gravel is also compromised. 

It is therefore imperative that maintenance and renewal of the wearing course is the highest priority for Council to minimise/prevent water ingress into the pavement to ensure:

1.    The design life of the pavement is realised

2.    The useful life of the pavement is maximised

3.    The whole of life costs in owning and operating the pavement are minimised

4.    The levels of service provided are optimised, and

5.    The integrity of the road network can be sustained. 

Best Practice maintenance and renewal of the wearing course is achieved by sealing  cracks as soon as possible after they occur using bituminous products and either rejuvenating the bitumen in the asphalt or aggregate seal layers to keep them pliable or resurfacing the asphalt or aggregate seal on a cyclical basis - generally 10-20 years for aggregate seal wearing courses and 20-30 years for asphaltic wearing courses, depending on traffic volumes, traffic types and environmental factors.  

A flow on effect of not sealing cracks in the wearing course as soon as possible after they occur is that roads that are suitable for resurfacing require more preparation work (small patching to repair potholes and shape correction for drainage and restoration of ride quality) before the application of the new wearing course can be applied, meaning that a higher unit rate per km of road is required for the resealing program, resulting in less coverage of pavement being able to be achieved for the funding allocated.

Based on the last 3 years resurfacing program for sealed roads, Council is currently achieving a 40-50 year cycle for the renewal of aggregate sealed wearing course.  Only 21,276m2 of approximately 345,000m2 of asphalt wearing course has been renewed as the budget allocated for this program was redirected as Council’s 25% contribution to grant funds received for the Lake Albert, Kooringal Road and Pearson/Dobney road rehabilitation projects.

 

(g)     Overview of current materials and methods used to repair potholes (including costings) and an investigation into the cost of alternative materials and methods which could be more durable, and long-lasting

Potholes within the Wagga Wagga LGA area are currently filled by one of the following materials:

·    Bitumen Emulsion and 5 or 7mm pre-coated aggregate

·    Hot asphalt (AC10), or

·    Cold mix (asphalt that is cold and has a higher bitumen content to make it workable at ambient temperatures)

Council has five units, four of which are specialised units that are used to dispense the materials above into potholes:

·    2 x Ausroad Jet patcher trucks that dispense bitumen emulsion & aggregate

·    1 x Flocon that can dispense all three materials in a ‘throw & go’ type operation

·    1 x Ausroad Horizontal Discharge Truck that can dispense all three materials in a ‘throw & go’ type operation

·    1 x 6T Tip Truck that is fitted with an emulsion tank and can disperse Cold mix or Bitumen Emulsion & aggregate materials in a ‘throw & go’ type operation.

Given the variable nature of materials which are used to fill potholes, the different methods of dispensing the material into the potholes, the size of the pothole and that the level of difficulty in filling a pothole on a road increases as the traffic volume, traffic type and traffic speed increases, it is difficult to put a specific costing on the cost to fill a pothole using the current methods.

It is acknowledged that the current methods to repair a pothole are not a long term permanent fix, however given the increased rate of deterioration of the sealed road network as a result of the La Nina weather phenomenon’s over the last two years and the significant number of potholes that form following prolonged rain events, the current practices are the quickest and cheapest methods to fill potholes.

Best Practice repair of a pothole (that is a permanent fix) is to replace the missing pavement material, blend it with the existing pavement material to ensure there is the potential for good bonding between the material (to avoid layering in the pavement that is commonly called lamination) and compact the material to 100% before re-applying the wearing course (aggregate seal or asphalt) that is squared up and crack sealed around its edge.

With the recent State Government announcement of a Pothole Repair Round of the Fixing Local Roads program, Council will use this opportunity to engage local contractors to undertake repairs of potholes using the best practice methodology described above and capture the average cost of repairing potholes this way on the basis that our application is successful.  Council staff will also capture the average cost of the current Council methodology of filling potholes for a comparison and study to determine the optimum methodology for Council. 

(h)     Challenges unique to Wagga Wagga in road maintenance

There are no specific challenges unique to Wagga Wagga in road maintenance.

Wagga Wagga is the most populous city of all regional centres in NSW with a vibrant and progressive economy located in southern NSW close to Snowy Mountains region.

The most significant challenge our road network faces is the seasonal changes in temperatures combined with the uniform nature of rainfall across the year and the significant volumes of traffic that a large vibrant regional city generates, in particular on the State and Regional Road network in the rural areas of the municipality and on the State, Regional, Sub-Arterial and Collector road network within the city of Wagga Wagga as identified on the following road hierarchy map.

 

During summer, the heat bakes the pavements.  Our unsealed roads dry out and do not retain any moisture that has been added by watercarts to assist with binding the gravel together to form the shape of the road during grading.  Subsequently, the pavements unravel and lose fine material (dust) as vehicles traverse along them resulting in rutting (longitudinal depressions), windrows of loose material and potholing. 

Fundamentally, the pavements lose their shape to drain water off the road as sheet flow and when rain does occur, water concentrates in the ruts and potholes resulting in softening and weakening of the pavement as well as eroding/scouring.  For our sealed roads, the bitumen in them oxidises at a greater rate because of the more intense UV effects of the sun on them resulting in the binding function of the bitumen becoming more brittle (less viscous) over time.  Subsequently cracking occurs which impacts the water-proofing function of the seal to keep the pavement dry during rain.  Water then enters the pavement through these cracks and softens and weakens the pavements leading to the pumping of fines from the pavement material as vehicles drive over the ‘weakened’ pavement and the on-set of potholes. 

During the winter months, the difference between overnight minimum temperatures (0-3 degrees) and daytime maximum temperatures is generally in the order of 10 degrees.  Insufficient heat is generated during the day to dry out the atmosphere leading to continual dampness.  For our unsealed roads, the dampness can help with keeping the pavement bound together, however if the wet/dry strength ratio of the pavement material is poor or the plasticity (clay) content of the material is too high, the roads will heave and rut resulting in loss of shape and again losing their ability to shed water off them as sheet flow. 

For our sealed network, water ingress to the pavement through cracks and subsequently potholes exposes the pavement to less bearing capacity for longer periods because there is no ‘baking out’ of the moisture and in turn ‘crocodile’ cracking of the wearing course and deformation of pavement layer (loss of shape) occurs as shown in the following photo.

 

A picture containing outdoor, ground, road, grass

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Hence the key for success in maintaining our road network is to regularly grade our unsealed roads to maintain good uniform shape with crossfalls of the pavement so as to ensure water sheet flows off the travel lanes and drains away from the pavement whilst for sealed roads it is about sealing cracks and as soon as possible after they occur and regularly renewing the wearing course that protects the underlying pavement from the harsh environment.

(i)      At the conclusion of the report, forward to State and Federal members for comment and/or support

A letter will be forwarded as per the recommendation.

 

(j)      Explore new machinery and products to amend and properly repair potholes

Council is continually exploring new machinery and products to help with productivity and efficiency gains. 

To patch potholes properly, Council has 2 Skid Steer set-ups as shown in the following photo that include a profiling attachment to blend the existing pavement materials as well as separate compaction and watering equipment. This equipment is mainly used to repair potholes in preparation for the bitumen reseal program as well as the reinstatement of road surfaces following trench excavation in the pavement by utility providers such as Riverina Water and APA Gas.

A picture containing sky, truck, outdoor, road

Description automatically generated

 

JCB have developed a wheeled excavator version of Council’s skid steer set-up that is called the Pothole Pro.  Following is an image of the Pot hole Pro.

A picture containing text, tree, road, outdoor

Description automatically generated


 

It would appear that this machine is primarily a set-up for milling out semi-rigid and rigid pavements (deep lift asphalt and concrete) to leave a 40-50mm square that has to be filled to reinstate the wearing course.   Council has enquired with the local JCB dealer who has advised that the wheeled excavator is only just starting to be imported to Australia.  Council will continue to enquire about this machine to determine what advantages, if any, it has over the existing set-ups and whether its attachments could be fitted to Council’s 4WD backhoe shown in the following photo:

A picture containing outdoor, sky, truck, road

Description automatically generated

 

Through our suppliers of bitumen and asphalt products, Council is continually exploring, testing and utilising new bitumen and asphalt products that are more durable, stronger and longer lasting as well as incorporate recycled products.  An example is the EME product that Fulton Hogan Industries has used in the most recent Lake Albert, Kooringal Road and Pearson/Dobney roadworks that have used a stronger material for the base course.  Most of our asphalt overlays and aggregate seals include a Poly Modified Binder (recycled rubber) material in them to be more flexible to the underlaying pavement movement as well as more resilient to the cyclical environment factors such as heat, cold and water.

 

(k)     Investigate the use of contractors to tender for major roadworks to reduce the timeframes for upgrades and total costs

Council currently engages contractors for major roadworks. Tenders are called for one-off capital works road projects that are listed in the Long-Term Financial Plan, past examples being:

·   The Farrer Road Upgrade

·   The Bomen Enabling Roads Projects – Merino Road construction, Dorset Drive extension, Byrnes Road and Eunony Bridge deviations


 

The current major roadworks out to tender are:

·   The Dunns Road intersection upgrades at the Olympic Highway and Holbrook Road

·   Lord Baden Powell Drive Upgrade.

Most of the roadworks that are proposed to be undertaken in this financial year will be completed by contractors, for example:

·   The urban asphalt and bitumen resealing program

·   Inglewood Drive rehabilitation

·   Bourke Street rehabilitation

·   Copland Street rehabilitation

·   Nagle Street rehabilitation

·   Maclaey Street rehabilitation

·   Old Narrandera Road upgrade between Olympic Hwy and Pine Gully Road

·   Gregadoo Road upgrade

In the 2021/22 Financial Year, contractors were engaged to complete the following works:

·   The bitumen resealing program

·   Lake Albert Road Stage 3A (Stanley St to Fay Ave) rehabilitation

·   Lake Albert Road Stage 3B (Lord Baden to Warrawong) rehabilitation

·   Pearson Street & Dobney Avenue rehabilitation

·   Kooringal Road (Copland Street to Parson Street) rehabilitation

·   Kooringal Road (Vincent Road to Mena Street) rehabilitation

·   Red Hill Road (Plumpton Road to Tamar Street) rehabilitation

·   Red Hill Road (Bourke Street to Glenfield Road) rehabilitation

·   Northcott Parade (Walteela Avenue to Phillip Avenue) rehabilitation

·   Stanley Crescent (Lake Albert Road to Leavenworth Drive) rehabilitation

·   Darlow Street rehabilitation

 

Financial Implications

Whilst there are no financial implications in resolving to receive and note this report as recommended, Wagga Wagga City Council has a known shortfall of roads funding as noted earlier in this report. 

 

Each year that a shortfall in roads maintenance and renewal funding is maintained, this not only adds to the rate of deterioration of the network, but also creates an infrastructure backlog.  That is, the funding gap accumulates and more significant investment in funds is required to bring the network back up to the acceptable standard. 

 

Council staff are recommending for alternative revenue streams to be identified, reviewed and implemented where appropriate.

 

Policy and Legislation

Local Government Act 1993

Transport Administration Act

Roads Act 1993

Civil Liability Act

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Community leadership and collaboration

Objective: Wagga Wagga has strong community leadership and a shared vision for the future

Plan long term for the future of Wagga Wagga

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

Roads are Council’s largest and most dynamic class of infrastructure assets that are required to absorb the continual increase in traffic impacts from growth and development (in particular associated with heavy vehicles) as well as be resilient to the effects of the environment – hot, cold and wet weather.

 

Given the dynamic nature of the asset, the Levels of Service that the road network provides is a reflection of the maintenance and renewal effort applied to the roads.  From a financial perspective, Council’s roads are being consumed at a greater rate than they are being renewed, that is the depreciation expense is greater than the renewal expense and hence the condition of roads is gradually deteriorating.

 

Council is able to and does manage the liability associated with a deteriorating road network via its Roads Maintenance and Asset Management Plans in conjunction with the Civil Liability Act, however a deteriorating road network does present a reputational and financial risk for council. 

Internal / External Consultation

There has only been internal consultation in developing this report.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

RP-4

 

RP-4               Response to Notice of Motion - Veteran's Employment at Wagga Wagga City Council

Author:                        Fiona Piltz 

General Manager:    Peter Thompson

         

 

Summary:

This report is a response to a Notice of Motion from Councillor Hayes at the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 11 April 2022 in relation to Veteran’s Employment in local government, including at Wagga Wagga City Council.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receive and note the report.

 

Report

At the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 11 April 2022, the following was resolved:

 

That Council:

a       receive a report detailing improvements to our recruitment processes, job vacancy notifications, website, and post application support with the aim to attract veterans to apply for positions at our council

b       invite councils in the Riverina Joint Organisation and Canberra Joint Organisation to also consider improving their recruitment process to better attract veterans to job opportunities

 

NSW has the highest proportion of major Defence bases in the country. The latest Census data indicates there are more than 3,800 Veterans in the Riverina electorate of which 1,426 reside in Wagga Wagga. Wagga Wagga also has the three arms of the Defence Force in the regional city – the Home of the Soldier, Blamey Barracks at Kapooka, RAAF Base Wagga and the Royal Australian Navy.

In response to the Notice of Motion, Council has undertaken a number of actions. The relevant area of Council has attended a Local Government NSW network meeting where the Manager Veteran’s Employment Program provided a presentation on the NSW Government Veteran Strategy and an overview of individual councils taking a lead on initiatives to support veterans employment in the sector.

Potential opportunities for Improvements to Council’s current Recruitment Processes

 

Commitment Statement and Job Advertisements

 

·    Promoting events/sessions/job vacancies within the Veteran Community, including through Social Media and the use of hashtags to improve reach

·    Adopting a statement of support i.e. a commitment statement, on Council’s careers website such as, “we understand the skills and attributes, veterans can bring to our Council”.

·    Broadening the current statement on all job advertisements to include reference to Veterans: 

 

“Council is an inclusive employer. We strive to reflect the community in which we work, as a result we welcome and encourage applications from skilled people from all walks of life. This includes women, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, culturally and linguistically diverse people, people with a disability, sexually and gender diverse people, people with lived experience and people of all ages.”

 

Change to:

“Council is an inclusive employer. We strive to reflect the community in which we work, as a result we welcome and encourage applications from skilled people from all walks of life. This includes women, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, culturally and linguistically diverse people, people with a disability, veterans, sexually and gender diverse people, people with lived experience and people of all ages.”

 

Job Applications

 

·  Including a veteran’s indicator question on job applications, for reporting and statistical purposes and to identify areas of improvement in Council’s recruitment processes.

 

“Working with Council” section of Council’s Website

 

·    Council is taking actions towards adopting a similar approach to Campbelltown City Council (as recommended by the Veterans Employment Program) by updating Council’s current Working with Council webpage with a dedicated page with information in relation to veterans working within Local Government and including:

o A commitment statement from Council in relation to recognising the unique skills and attributes demonstrated by service personnel in their service to our country and acknowledging these skills and attributes are valued by Council in serving our local community.

o Strongly encouraging ex-service personnel to look at the many and varied opportunities available at Council and within Local Government (with appropriate links to other Local Government advertising websites i.e. Careers at Council etc).

o Information on who individuals can contact for support with applying for a role at Council.

 

·  Promoting reasons to choose a career in Local Government:

o Transferable Skills

o Diverse job opportunities

o Education Assistance

o Flexible work arrangements

o Employee Assistant Program

o Generous Leave entitlements including Military Leave Entitlements i.e., for Defence Force Training, Training Courses for Defence Force Reserves, and Annual Defence Force Reserve Camp.

 

·    Information regarding the Veterans’ Employment Program

·    Profiles of ex-service personnel currently employed by Council and their individual stories and experience in transitioning to local government. 

 

People & Culture will continue to assess the external environment and where possible explore opportunities or initiatives that may align with Council’s Workforce Resource Strategy 2022 -2026.

 

Financial Implications

N/A

Policy and Legislation

N/A

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Safe and Healthy Community

Objective: Our community embraces healthier lifestyle choices and practices

Promote access and participation for all sections of the community to a full range of sports and recreational activities

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

N/A

Internal / External Consultation

N/A

 

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

RP-5

 

RP-5               DRAFT INNOVATE RECONCILIATION ACTION PLAN 2022-2024

Author:         Madeleine Scully 

Executive:    Janice Summerhayes

         

 

Summary:

Council’s revised draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022- 2024 provides a resource for Councillors and Council staff to use when understanding and working to address issues related to Reconciliation and working collaboratively with the Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri and First Nations community in the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area. This is an updated document following the previous Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2017 – 2021.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a       place the draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022 - 2024 on public exhibition for a period of 28 days from 23 November 2022 to 21 December 2022 and invite public submissions on the draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022- 2024

b       receive a further report following the exhibition and submission period:

i         addressing any submissions made in respect of the proposed draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022- 2024

ii        proposing adoption of the draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022- 2024 unless there are any recommended amendment deemed to be substantial and requiring a further public exhibition period

 

Report

The draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022 – 2024 is a level 2 strategic document that guides Wagga Wagga City Council (WWCC) with a framework of priorities and actions for a two-year period. It is written utilising a compulsory Reconciliation Australia Innovate template and in line with endorsement criteria developed by Reconciliation Australia. It also incorporates the Thriving, Innovation, Connected and Inclusive guiding principles of Council and works towards the visions of the Wagga Wagga Community Strategic Plan 2040 – Wagga View.

 

Community Consultation and Strategic Alignment

 

The Wagga Wagga Community Strategic Plan 2040 – Wagga View outlines WWCC’s long term commitment to our Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri and First Nations community members, ensuring that our leaders represent the First Nations community, that appropriate health, wellbeing and educational services are developed and accessible, First Nations creative practices are displayed in our precincts and First Nations peoples are actively involved in educating and engaging our community on land, environment and sustainability initiatives and practices.The draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022- 2024 follows on from the success of its predecessor the Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2017- 2021.

The Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2017 - 2021 was to ensure that there was a demonstration of commitment from local government to Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri and First Nations peoples on improving reconciliation, increasing collaboration between WWCC and the First Nations community for key areas such as cultural protocols, land/environment, employment and education, along with access to services and facilities. Councillors may notice the spelling of Wiradjuri with a Y. As part of Council’s ongoing commitment to reconciliation, we are ensuring that we acknowledge Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri language where possible and amend where advice has been offered. This advice has been received from The Budyaan Trust, with endorsement from Uncle Stan Grant Senior. The Bunyaan Trust have advised WWCC of this change in spelling because the sound of the letter ‘J’ does not exist in the Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri language, instead the sound of the letter ‘Y’ is phonetically more accurate.

 

Notable achievements from the Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2017 – 2021 include:

 

·   Events were held for First Nation’s Days of Significance both in-person and online. Online videos were created for National Apology Day in 2021 and 2022 due to COVID restrictions. A truth telling panel was held in the E3 Art Space for NAIDOC Week in 2019.

 

·   Nguluway “Meeting Each Other” was held during Reconciliation Week 2022. This was a weeklong program of events that was organised in partnership between WWCC and the First Nations community. Events held during this week included a documentary screening of Occupation: Native in the WWCC Chambers, a youth event held at a community hub facilitated by members of RAAF, the Army and the Navy, a Truth Telling Panel held at WWCC City Library on the history of First Nations soldiers, and a Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri Choir in the Victory Memorial Gardens.

 

·   Sorry Day 2022 was held on 26 May 2022 and had a large turnout of members from the community. This included First Nations community members, non-Indigenous community members, WWCC Councillors and staff, and state member for Wagga Wagga Dr Joe McGirr MP.

 

·   WWCC provided ongoing support to Elders and the community group, Mawang Gaway. WWCC staff consistently attend these meetings to share with First Nations community on progress being made regarding events and projects and a place for Council staff to be guided on project and strategic planning processes. 

 

·   WWCC strengthened relations with Riverina Medical and Dental Corporation (RIVMED), Argyle Housing, and the Aboriginal Health Centre via partnerships to deliver NAIDOC week content online. In addition, WWCC provided event support to First Nation groups in the development and delivery of NAIDOC week events that were presented in locations across the City.

 

·   Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri Elders have been delivering Cultural Awareness Training to all WWCC staff. This has ensured that all staff that work at WWCC have a base and shared understanding of Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri and First Nations culture, and how to work closely with Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri and First Nations community.

 

·   WWCC’s Executive team meets with the Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri Elders at a minimum of four times a year.

 

·   When acquiring corporate gifts, WWCC has purchased the gifts from Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri artists selling their artwork at council locations.

 

·   In 2019 Council’s Procurement Policy was updated with the Regional Procurement Preference Policy being adopted by WWCC. WWCC engages a local Indigenous owned and operated catering service for a range of events. 

 

·   In 2020, Civil Construction finalised the recruitment of First Nations Peoples to fill four apprentice positions. In 2022, a First Nations Environmental Health Officer traineeship was established.

 

·   Elders and community provided valuable input to the development and adoption of WWCC’s Biodiversity Strategy: Maldhangilanha 2020-2030. 

 

·   The First Nations community endorsed WWCC’s Acknowledgement to Country and Council has sourced from the Budyaan Trust a version in Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri language. This Acknowledgement in language is displayed in prominent locations at Council buildings such as the Civic Centre front foyer and at the entrances to WWCC’s cultural facilities.

 

·   In line with WWCC’s adopted cultural protocols a list of Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri Elders is maintained on WWCC’s intranet advising on who is able to perform a Welcome to Country at WWCC events.

 

·   To commence each calendar year first Ordinary Council meeting an Elder is engaged to conduct a Welcome to Country. Aunty Isabel Reid performed a Welcome to Country on the 18 January 2021 and Uncle James Ingram performed the Welcome to Country on 10 January 2022.

 

·   WWCC has engaged with and received design input from local Elders and the First Nations Women’s group on upgrades to Pomingalarna and Riverside development sites. In addition, signage was designed and approved to be displayed throughout the Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri walking track, reflective of Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri culture.

 

·   Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri artwork was developed and displayed for the entrances to the Main City Levee bank. WWCC is actively working to ensure First Nation’s People’s content is available and visible in public spaces.

 

·   Expansion of meaningful First Nation public programs and exhibitions have been delivered across WWCC Cultural facilities, inclusive of Elder led artistic talks and art gallery engagement programs. Embedding Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri language in WWCC public promotional guides and campaigns has been strengthened. WWCC’s Visitor Information Centre supports and promotes local led Wiradjuri cultural tours.

 

The draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022 – 2024 builds on this progress and sees WWCC undertake an Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) for the second time. Reconciliation Australia determine an organisations ability to move through to different stages and have a requirement that an organisation undertakes at least two Innovate RAPS before being given consideration to progress to a Stretch RAP. An Innovate RAP runs for two years, and outlines actions for achieving WWCC’s vision for reconciliation.

 

Innovate RAP commitments allow Council to gain a deeper understanding of its sphere of influence and establish the best approach to advance reconciliation as an organisation. An Innovate RAP focuses on developing and strengthening relationships with Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri and First Nations peoples, engaging staff, and stakeholders in reconciliation, and developing and piloting innovative strategies to empower Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri and First Nations peoples. There are four key areas for WWCC’s draft Innovate Reconciliation Action plan 2022 – 2024 as follows:

1.    Relationships

2.    Respect

3.    Opportunities

4.    Governance

The RAP document requires conditional endorsement from Reconciliation Australia. This requires a minimum of two draft submissions sent to Reconciliation Australia for review, taking approximately 4 to 6 weeks on each occasion. Four draft reviews have already been completed with Reconciliation Australia with conditional endorsement to progress with this current document. Community consultations were also undertaken during this time, utilising various engagement methods, including face-to-face RAP working group meetings, presentations at Mawang Gaway the local Aboriginal Consultative Committee, presentations direct to Wiradjuri Elders at quarterly Elders and Council Executive meetings and one-on-one meetings with internal Council staff.

 

As the Reconciliation Australia Innovate template dictates action items for WWCC, the consultations were to ensure community were brought along on Council’s RAP journey from the beginning and to confirm that the action items are to build on and further embed best practice by WWCC regarding representing, and working alongside, our Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri and First Nations community. A key difference in the draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022 - 2024 initiated by these consultations, was the request that the historical and demographic information regarding the Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri and First Nations community better reflect community’s strength and determination. Therefore, the document contains stories told direct from local Elders that provides deeper insight into Wagga Wagga’s history as a resettlement area and the successes of the Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri and First Nations community that have thrived here.

 

Once the draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022 – 2024 is approved and placed on public exhibition staff will be undertaking further engagement with Elders and the community through varying methods including face to face meetings for final feedback on the document. During this period Reconciliation Australia will also provide their final feedback prior to the close of the public exhibition period. Given the consultation that has already been undertaken, it is anticipated to table the draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022 – 2024 at the 21 November 2022 Ordinary Council meeting to be placed on public exhibition for 28 days between 23 November 2022 to 21 December 2022. Through January staff will then collate any feedback from the public exhibition engagement period for a further report to the 13 February 2023 Ordinary Council meeting.

 


 

Financial Implications

The updated draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022 – 2024 will inform the development of strategies and planning processes undertaken by Wagga Wagga City Council moving forward.

 

All items contained in the draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022 – 2024 Plan are either included in existing operational budgets and/or considered as part of the current draft 2023/24 Long Term Financial Plan. Any unfunded items listed will require external funding to support their implementation.

Policy and Legislation

Wagga Wagga Community Strategic Plan 2040 – Wagga View.

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Place and Identity

Objective: Our community are proud of where we live and our identity

Value our heritage

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

Risk management will be addressed as part of implementation of each action and managed by the respective nominated area of Council.

Internal / External Consultation

A councillor workshop was held on October 31, 2022 to seek Councillor feedback on the draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022 – 2024. Consultation with Reconciliation Australia has been undertaken in the development of the draft Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2022 – 2024.  

 

Reconciliation Australia determine an organisations ability to move through to different stages and have been engaged for this requirement along with the conditional endorsement from Reconciliation Australia.

 

The document will also be sent to Reconciliation Australia for final feedback during the public exhibition period. Community consultations were also undertaken during the development of the draft document, utilising various engagement methods, including face-to-face RAP working group meetings, presentations at Mawang Gaway the local Aboriginal Consultative Committee, presentations direct to Wiradjuri/Wiradyuri Elders at quarterly Elders and Council Executive meetings and one-on-one meetings with internal Council staff. Further engagement during the public exhibition period will occur for community feedback.

 


 

 

 

Mail

Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news story

Council News advert

Media releases

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meetings

Your Say website

Community meetings

Stakeholder workshops

Drop-in sessions

Surveys and feedback forms

Social media

Email newsletters

Website

Digital advertising

TIER

Consult

 

 

 

 

 

x

x

x

 

x

 

x

x

x

x

Involve

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

Draft - Innovate Reconcilitation Action Plan 2022-2024 - Provided under separate cover

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

RP-6

 

RP-6               Presentation of the 2021/22 Financial Statements

Author:         Zachary Wilson 

Executive:    Carolyn Rodney

         

 

Summary:

Council resolved to sign the 2021/22 Financial Statements at the 17 October 2022 Council Meeting, enabling Council officers to lodge the financial statements with the Office of Local Government (OLG) prior to the 31 October 2022 due date.

 

Council’s external auditors, NSW Audit Office have completed their Auditor’s Report, and have provided this to Council for their information.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a       receive the Audited Financial Statements, together with the Auditor’s Reports on the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2022

b       receive a further report if any public submissions are received

 

Report

The Audit Reports for the 2021/22 Financial Statements have now been received and are presented in accordance with section 419(1) of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

Council has provided public notice that the Financial Statements and Auditor’s Reports will be presented at this meeting in accordance with section 418 of the Local Government Act 1993 and has invited public submissions on the audited financial statements, with submissions open until Monday 28 November 2022.

 

Financial Implications

Whilst this report and associated attachments show Council’s financial performance and position for the 2021/22 financial year, the adoption of this report by the Council has no financial implications.

Policy and Legislation

Local Government Act 1993

Sections:   419 – Presentation of council’s financial reports

420 – Submissions on financial reports and auditor’s report

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Leadership and Collaboration

Objective: We have strong leadership

Outcome: We are accountable and transparent

 


 

Risk Management Issues for Council

The NSW Audit Office have provided Council with a final Management Letter which has identified six (6) issues with one (1) rated as High, two (2) rated as Moderate and three (3) rated as Low. The final management letter, including Councils management responses, will be presented to the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee meeting on 1 December 2022.

Internal / External Consultation

The Council’s Community Engagement Strategy and IAP2 considers the community to be “any individual or group of individuals, organisation or political entity with an interest in the outcome of a decision….”

 

Council’s external auditors, NSW Audit Office have liaised with Council’s Finance division and presented the draft Financial Statements in detail to the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee at the 6 October 2022 Committee meeting. Councillors were invited to the Committee meeting and had the opportunity to discuss any aspects of the 2021/22 financial statements with the NSW Audit Office staff prior to the 17 October 2022 Council meeting.

 

The draft Financial Statements were approved for signing by Council at its 17 October 2022 Council meeting and were lodged with the OLG on 18 October 2022.

 

Attachments

 

1.

2021/22 Annual Financial Statements - Provided under separate cover

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

RP-7

 

RP-7               POL 075 - Investment Policy

Author:         Zachary Wilson 

Executive:    Carolyn Rodney

         

 

Summary:

Council’s Investment Policy (POL 075) is required to be reviewed annually with any amendments approved by Council. A review has been undertaken and only minor amendments are proposed to the current Policy. This Policy is presented to Council for endorsement, following public exhibition.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a       note that there were no public submissions received during the exhibition period for POL 075 – Investment Policy

b       adopt the draft POL 075 – Investment Policy

 

Report

Council’s Investment Policy provides a framework for Council officers who have been delegated by the General Manager to invest Council funds. The Policy ensures that adequate controls are in place to ensure Council’s investments are managed appropriately, in order to maximise the return to Council in accordance with the risk appetite of Council.

 

Council, at its 19 September 2022 Council meeting, resolved to place the draft Investment Policy on public exhibition for a period of 28 days from 20 September 2022 to 17 October 2022 and invite public submissions until 31 October 2022.

 

During the submission period, no public submission were received.

 

It is recommended that Council adopt the Policy as exhibited.

 

Financial Implications

The content of the Investment Policy determines what types of investments and terms are allowable and its content outlines the framework Council officers are able to work within in making investment decisions. The role of Council officers responsible for managing Council’s investment portfolio is to maximise investment revenue earned, whilst adhering to the Investment Policy.

Council’s portfolio balance was $192.4M at 31 October 2022 with budgeted investment income for the 2022/23 financial year of $1.6M.

Policy and Legislation

POL 075 – Investment Policy

Local Government Act 1993 – Section 625

Local Government (General) Regulation 2021 – Section 212

 

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Leadership and Collaboration

Objective: We have strong leadership

Outcome: We are accountable and transparent

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

The Investment Policy attempts to mitigate the potential loss of investment income or capital resulting from ongoing management of investments, especially during difficult economic times. 

As required by the Local Government (General) Regulation 2021, Council officers report monthly to Council on the investment portfolio performance and position.

Internal / External Consultation

Council’s independent investment advisor, Imperium Markets, has reviewed the policy and has provided adjustments where necessary.

 

Council officers have also reported the reviewed Policy to the Audit, Risk and Improvement Committee, at its 18 August 2022 meeting.

 

Following endorsement by Council at its 19 September 2022 Council meeting, the draft policy was placed on public exhibition for a period of 28 days from 20 September 2022 to 17 October 2022 with public submissions received until 31 October 2022.

 

Attachments

 

1.

Investment Policy - POL 075

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

RP-7

 

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Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 21 November 2022

RP-8

 

RP-8               FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE REPORT AS AT 31 OCTOBER 2022

Author:                        Carolyn Rodney 

         

 

Summary:

This report is for Council to consider information presented on the 2022/23 budget and Long-Term Financial Plan, and details Council’s external investments and performance as at 31 October 2022.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a       approve the proposed 2022/23 budget variations for the month ended 31 October 2022 and note the balanced budget position as presented in this report

b       approve the proposed budget variations to the 2022/23 Long Term Financial Plan Capital Works Program including future year timing adjustments

c        note the Responsible Accounting Officer’s reports, in accordance with the Local Government (General) Regulation 2021 (Part 9 Division 3: Clause 203) that the financial position of Council is satisfactory having regard to the original estimates of income and expenditure and the recommendations made above

d       note the details of the external investments as at 31 October 2022 in accordance with section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993

 

Report

Wagga Wagga City Council (Council) forecasts a balanced budget position as at 31 October 2022.

 

The balanced budget position excludes the Wagga Wagga Airport estimated deficit result for the financial year – as previously reported to Council, any Airport deficit result will be sanctioned, and funded in the interim by General Purpose Revenue (via the Internal Loans Reserve).  The deficit results will be accounted for as a liability in the Airport’s end of financial year statements and paid back to General Purpose Revenue (Internal Loans Reserve) by the Airport in future financial years. 

 

Proposed budget variations including adjustments to the capital works program are detailed in this report for Council’s consideration and adoption.

 

Council has experienced a positive monthly investment performance for the month of October when compared to budget ($316,594 up on the monthly budget). This is mainly due to better than budgeted returns on Councils investment portfolio, as a result of the ongoing movement in the interest rate environment and a positive return on Councils NSW T-Corp Managed Fund in October 2022.

 


 

Key Performance Indicators

 

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OPERATING INCOME

Total operating income is 36% of approved budget and is trending slightly above budget for the month of October 2022. An adjustment has been made to reflect the levy of rates that occurred at the start of the financial year. Excluding this adjustment, operating income received is 78% when compared to budget.

 

OPERATING EXPENSES

Total operating expenditure is 34% of approved budget so it is tracking slightly over budget at this stage of the financial year. This is due to the payment of annual one-off expenses such as rates and insurance.

 

CAPITAL INCOME

Total capital income is 13% of approved budget. It is important to note that the actual income from capital is influenced by the timing of the receipt of capital grants and contributions in relation to expenditure incurred on the projects. This income also includes the sale of property, plant and equipment.

 

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Total capital expenditure including commitments is 26% of approved budget with some purchase orders being raised for the full contract amounts for multi-year projects. Excluding commitments, the total expenditure is 6% when compared to the approved budget.

WAGGA WAGGA CITY COUNCIL
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE
1 JULY 2022 TO 31 OCTOBER 2022

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT

 

ORIGINAL
BUDGET
2022/23

BUDGET ADJ
2022/23

APPROVED BUDGET
2022/23

YTD ACTUAL   EXCL COMMT'S 2022/23

COMMT'S 2022/23

YTD ACTUAL + COMMT'S
2022/23

YTD % OF BUD

Revenue 

Rates & Annual Charges

(75,524,168)

0

(75,524,168)

(25,076,082)

0

(25,076,082)

33%

User Charges & Fees

(27,844,136)

(442,450)

(28,286,586)

(10,071,085)

0

(10,071,085)

36%

Other Revenues

(2,769,503)

(202,000)

(2,971,503)

(1,094,950)

0

(1,094,950)

37%

Operating Grants & Contributions

(13,524,889)

6,755,358

(6,769,530)

(3,475,078)

0

(3,475,078)

51%

Capital Grants & Contributions

(36,295,253)

(47,353,782)

(83,649,035)

(9,038,390)

0

(9,038,390)

11%

Interest & Investment Income

(1,828,128)

0

(1,828,128)

(1,534,936)

0

(1,534,936)

84%

Other Income

(1,406,222)

(52,750)

(1,458,972)

(584,477)

0

(584,477)

40%

Total Revenue

(159,192,300)

(41,295,624)

(200,487,923)

(50,874,998)

0

(50,874,998)

25%

 

  

Expenses

 

Employee Benefits & On-Costs

51,315,412

100,000

51,415,412

15,145,612

0

15,145,612

29%

Borrowing Costs

3,268,989

0

3,268,989

635,792

0

635,792

19%

Materials & Services

36,542,674

7,081,957

43,624,631

14,814,438

4,309,051

19,123,489

44%

Depreciation & Amortisation

43,196,051

0

43,196,051

14,398,684

0

14,398,684

33%

Other Expenses

1,866,271

2,078,121

3,944,392

302,185

46,534

348,719

9%

Total Expenses

136,189,398

9,260,078

145,449,476

45,296,711

4,355,585

49,652,296

34%

 

Net Operating (Profit)/Loss

(23,002,902)

(32,035,545)

(55,038,447)

(5,578,287)

4,355,585

(1,222,702)

 

Net Operating (Profit)/Loss before Capital Grants & Contributions

13,292,351

15,318,237

28,610,588

3,460,102

4,355,585

7,815,687

 

 

 

Capital / Reserve Movements

Capital Expenditure - One Off Confirmed

13,638,521

61,222,831

74,861,353

5,684,558

30,874,798

36,559,356

49%

Capital Expenditure – Recurrent

18,890,352

8,091,120

26,981,472

2,941,273

2,482,265

5,423,538

20%

Capital Exp – Pending Projects

59,770,944

(339,380)

59,431,564

0

0

0

0%

Loan Repayments

7,571,681

0

7,571,681

2,190,560

0

2,190,560

29%

New Loan Borrowings

(17,458,537)

(2,364,247)

(19,822,784)

0

0

0

0%

Sale of Assets

(880,181)

(2,210,993)

(3,091,174)

(2,453,452)

0

(2,453,452)

79%

Net Movements Reserves

(15,333,827)

(32,363,786)

(47,697,613)

0

0

0

0%

Total Cap/Res Movements

66,198,954

32,035,545

98,234,499

8,362,939

33,357,063

41,720,002

 

 

 

ORIGINAL
BUDGET
2022/23

BUDGET ADJ
2022/23

APPROVED BUDGET
2022/23

YTD ACTUAL   EXCL COMT'S 2022/23

COMMT'S 2022/23

YTD ACTUAL + COMMT'S
2022/23

YTD % OF BUD

Net Result after Depreciation

43,196,052

0

43,196,052

2,784,652

37,712,648

40,497,299

 

 

Add back Depreciation Expense

43,196,051

0

43,196,051

14,398,684

0

14,398,684

33%

 

Cash Budget (Surplus) / Deficit

0

0

0

(11,614,032)

37,712,648

26,098,616

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years 2-10 Long Term Financial Plan (Surplus) /Deficit

 

Description

Budget

2023/24

Budget

2024/25

Budget

2025/26

Budget

2026/27

Budget

2027/28

Budget

2028/29

Budget

2029/30

Budget

2030/31

Budget

2031/32

Adopted Bottom Line (Surplus) / Deficit

1,163,681

1,205,672

4,377,581

4,833,506

2,199,382

1,967,334

1,257,474

1,234,053

418,437

Adopted Bottom Line Adjustments

27,330

28,547

43,051

44,342

45,673

47,042

48,454

49,907

51,404

Revised Bottom Line (Surplus) / Deficit

1,191,011

1,234,219

4,420,632

4,877,848

2,245,055

2,014,376

1,305,928

1,283,960

469,841

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




2022/23 Revised Budget Result – (Surplus) / Deficit

$’000s

Original 2022/23 Budget Result as adopted by Council

Total Budget Variations approved to date

Budget Variations for October 2022

$0K

$0K

$0K

Proposed Revised Budget result for 31 October 2022 - (Surplus) / Deficit

$0K

 

 

The proposed Operating and Capital Budget Variations for 31 October 2022 which affect the current 2022/23 financial year are listed below.

 

Budget Variation

Amount

Funding Source

Net Impact

(Fav)/ Unfav

1 – Community Leadership and Collaboration

Aerial Photography

$28K

Information Services Reserve ($28K)

Nil

Council have signed up for an aerial imagery service that supplies four imagery fly-overs of the Local Government Area per year, compared to the existing one fly-over every two years. This service will assist with many aspects of Council operations, including asset management, development assessment and compliance, flood and bushfire mapping and strategic planning.

It is proposed to fund the variation from the Information Services Reserve.

Estimated Completion: 30 June 2023

Job Consolidation: 14566

 

CCTV Maintenance and Replacement

$19K

Information Services Reserve ($19K)

Nil

Council’s CCTV cameras in Baylis, Fitzmaurice and Gurwood Streets have been failing due to age and damage and are required to be replaced.

It is proposed to fund the variation from the Information Services Reserve.

Estimated Completion: 30 June 2023

Job Consolidation:16983

 

2 – Safe and Healthy Community

Botanic Gardens Works

$59K

City Presentation ($59K)

Nil

Additional funds are required to undertake significant works at the Botanic Gardens including; Native Section Turfing ($21K), Wash Bay Construction at the Parks Depot ($23K), Kerb Works at the Parks Depot ($10K) & Fencing at the Cactus Garden ($5K). It is proposed to fund the variation from the existing City Presentation operating budget.

Estimated Completion: 30 June 2023

Job Consolidations: 22107 & 19785

 

4 – Community Place and Identity

Civic Theatre Communications System Upgrade

$26K

Civic Theatre Reserve ($26K)

Nil

The theatre needs to upgrade the Radio Base Station and purchase five new digital radios to replace the old analogue ones that are no longer usable. The Stage Managers Console needs to be upgraded as it is no longer fit for purpose. The Technical Workshop will also be fitted with reverse-cycle air conditioning so it can be used year-round.

 

It is proposed to fund the variation from the Civic Theatre Reserve.

Estimated Completion: 30 June 2023

Job Consolidation: 22082

 

5 – The Environment

Footpath Upgrade Edward Street

$50K

Civil Infrastructure Reserve ($50K)

Nil

Funds are required for the replacement of 350 metres of footpath along Edward Street, which was removed to allow Riverina Water to undertake works on the water main. It is planned to increase the width of the footpath to improve disability and inclusion access.

It is proposed to fund the variation from the Civil Infrastructure Reserve.

Estimated Completion: 30 June 2023

Job Consolidation: 22067

 

Bushfire Hazard Mitigation

$125K

Rural Fire Service (RFS) Grant Funding ($125K)

Nil

Council has been successful in securing grant funds from the Rural Fire Service (RFS) for Bushfire Hazard Mitigation. The funds will allow Council Officers to undertake Transport Corridor Fire Break works at 13 locations through slashing, trittering and spraying activities and Asset Protection Zone Maintenance at 15 locations through chemical fire trail maintenance.

Estimated Completion: 30 June 2023

Job Consolidation:16639

 

Murray Darling Healthy Rivers Grant Program

$150K

Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment Grant Funding ($150K)

Nil

Council has been successful in securing grant funds from the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment under the Murray-Darling Healthy Rivers Program. The grant will allow Council to undertake targeted willow removal along a stretch of the Murrumbidgee River in Wagga Wagga suffering from a large, dense willow infestation.

 

This will be followed by bank stabilisation through revegetation with appropriate native seedlings in partnership with OzFish and Wagga Wagga Urban Landcare group. Community engagement will include presenting the project to Mawang Gaway – our First Nations community consultation group and the Flood Risk Management Advisory Group.

Estimated Completion: 30 June 2023

Job Consolidation: 22076

 

 

$0K


 

The following 2022/23 and future year projects have been reviewed by Council’s Project Management Team and delivery timelines rescheduled. There has been no change to the total budgets for these projects.

 

Job No.

Project Title

2022/23 Current Pending

2022/23 Current Confirmed

2022/23 Proposed Confirmed

2023/24 Proposed Pending

2023/24 Proposed Confirmed

2024/25 Proposed Pending

2025/26 Proposed Pending

2026/27 Proposed Pending

47288

Airport Bays 1-3 Upg

$380,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

 $0

$0

$380,000

47320

Airport Energy Savings Proj

$178,903

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$178,903

$0

47192

Airport Redevelop Terminal

$8,550,960

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$8,550,960

$0

47310

Airport Reseal Don Kendall Dr

$166,645

$0

$166,645

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

47283

Airport Runway Lighting Upg

$1,411,505

$0

$1,411,505

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

21275

Bakers Lane Widening + Intersection

$412,500

$10,109

$422,609

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

17760

Bolton Park Precinct Upg*

$7,970,326

$391,094

$1,141,094

$0

$11,000,000

$10,000,000

$10,000,000

$7,683,481

18179

Civic Centre Entrance Canopy

$115,243

$0

$0

$0

$115,243

$0

$0

$0

38639

Copland St Stormwater*

$177,620

$0

$0

$285,120

$0

$0

$0

$0

13684

Dunns Rd Upg

$3,942,279

$2,904,266

$2,904,266

$0

$3,942,279

$0

$0

$0

19647

Embellish Estella New Local Park*

$1,495,725

$0

$0

$2,727,675

$0

$0

$0

$0

12922

Glenfield Rd Corridor Works*

$3,252,754

$72,655

$72,655

$0

$0

$11,290,268

$4,084,802

$0

19604

Gregadoo Rd Corridor Works*

$2,699,506

$117,207

$117,207

$0

$2,699,506

$0

$772,225

$772,225

70093

GWMC Asset Renewals*

$200,000

$0

$200,000

$0

$0

$150,000

$0

$0

70164

GWMC Construct new Waste Cell*

$1,903,826

$1,725,251

$725,251

$0

$2,903,826

$0

$0

$0

70147

GWMC Domestic Precinct*

$509,890

$101,611

$101,611

$5,608,790

$0

$1,200,000

$0

$0

70143

GWMC Wheel Washing Facility

$184,390

$5,151

$5,151

$184,390

$0

$0

$0

$0

70092

GWMC Progressive Site Rehab*

$229,159

$222,080

$0

$687,272

$0

$243,115

$250,408

$257,920

Job No.

Project Title

2022/23 Current Pending

2022/23 Current Confirmed

2022/23 Proposed Confirmed

2023/24 Proposed Pending

2023/24 Proposed Confirmed

2024/25 Proposed Pending

2025/26 Proposed Pending

2026/27 Proposed Pending

19664

Jubilee Park Athletics Upg

$3,861,883

$250,000

$900,000

$0

$3,211,883

$0

$0

$0

21273

Lawn Cemetery Master Plan Stg 2A works

$675,000

$74,878

$74,878

$675,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

19661

Lloyd Establish 3 Parks*

$1,538,625

 $660,324

$660,324

$1,538,625

$0

$2,401,850

$0

$0

19736

Lord Baden Powell Dr Upg

$2,480,557

$83,533

$2,564,090

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

18796

Northern Sporting Precinct

$5,258,854

$1,284,707

$1,284,707

$5,258,854

$0

$0

$0

$0

28154

Oasis 50m & Dive Pool Bulkhead Tiles Upg

$40,804

$0

$40,804

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

28152

Oasis CCTV Camera System Upg

$75,750

$0

$75,750

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

28155

Oasis Pool Hall Glass Doors Upg

$136,350

$0

$136,350

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

28156

Oasis Pool Hall Skylights Repair & Replace

$237,350

$0

$0

$0

$237,350

$0

$0

$0

28145

Oasis Water Features Proj

$1,689,022

$0

$0

$1,689,022

$0

$0

$0

$0

19601

Pine Gully Rd Corridor Works*

$2,117,089

$31,674

$1,231,674

$917,089

$0

$0

$2,999,630

$1,546,826

50199

Sewer Eliz Ave Forest Hill SPS22 New Asset

$975,183

$299,012

$1,274,195

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

50384

Sewer Install Pumpstations Flowmeters

$39,862

$34,889

$74,751

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

50221

Sewer Narrung St Treatment Plant Flood Infrastructure

$498,610

$0

$498,610

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

50245

Sewer Olympic Highway SPS13 New Asset*

$138,912

$0

$0

$944,822

$0

$0

$0

$0

50261

Sewer Springvale Pump Station SPS36 New Asset*

$59,646

$0

$59,646

$536,811

$0

$0

$0

$0

50266

Sewer Treatment Works Forest Hill New Asset*

$1,573,407

$138,147

$138,147

$2,305,185

$0

$0

$0

$0

Job No.

Project Title

2022/23 Current Pending

2022/23 Current Confirmed

2022/23 Proposed Confirmed

2023/24 Proposed Pending

2023/24 Proposed Confirmed

2024/25 Proposed Pending

2025/26 Proposed Pending

2026/27 Proposed Pending

17742

Stormwater Murray St*

$222,250

$10,808

$233,058

$2,952,750

$0

$0

$0

$0

18903

Victory Memorial Garden Toilet Block

$13,800

$1,180

$14,980

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

* These projects include existing future year adopted budgets in the Long Term Financial Plan.

 

 

The following 2022/23 and Future Year Capital project is now considered completed as per advice received from Council’s Project Management Team. The remaining funding can be returned to the relevant funding source.

 

Job

Description

2022/23 Current Pending

2024/25 Current Pending

2026/27 Current Pending

Budget

Adj

Commentary

70104

Hook Truck Bins

$100,671

$29,500

$31,270

($161,441)

Project budget is no longer required as this project has been completed in previous years.

 

 

 

2022/23 Capital Works Summary

 

Capital Works

Approved Budget

Proposed Movement

Proposed Budget

One-off

$74,861,353

$8,187,382

$83,048,735

Recurrent

$26,981,471

$22,590

$27,004,061

Pending

$59,431,564

($55,514,856)

$3,916,708

Total Capital Works

$161,274,388

($47,304,884)

$113,969,504

 


 

Current Restrictions

 

RESERVES SUMMARY

31 OCTOBER 2022

 

CLOSING BALANCE 2021/22

ADOPTED RESERVE TRANSFERS 2022/23

BUDGET VARIATIONS APPROVED UP TO COUNCIL MEETING 17.10.2022

PROPOSED CHANGES for Council Resolution*

BALANCE AS AT 31 OCTOBER 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

Externally Restricted

 

 

 

 

 

Developer Contributions - Section 7.11

(31,045,478)

7,213,679

3,153,478

 

(20,678,321)

Developer Contributions - Section 7.12

(278,187)

(28,179)

0

 

(306,366)

Developer Contributions - Stormwater Section 64

(7,112,864)

(786,229)

395,767

 

(7,503,326)

Sewer Fund

(32,439,399)

673,962

3,793,500

 

(27,971,937)

Solid Waste

(24,880,735)

7,737,392

1,676,784

 

(15,466,559)

Specific Purpose Unexpended Grants & Contributions

(4,195,951)

 

4,195,951

 

0

SRV Levee Reserve

(6,357,282)

0

57,520

 

(6,299,762)

Stormwater Levy

(5,150,281)

35,773

733,446

 

(4,381,062)

Total Externally Restricted

(111,460,179)

14,846,399

14,006,446

0

(82,607,334)

 

 

 

Internally Restricted

 

 

Airport

0

0

0

 

0

Art Gallery

(3,804)

0

0

 

(3,804)

Bridge Replacement

(296,805)

0

0

 

(296,805)

Buildings

(1,088,635)

(23,658)

238,578

 

(873,714)

CCTV

(100,843)

30,633

30,000

 

(40,211)

Cemetery

(882,761)

(226,784)

61,080

 

(1,048,465)

Civic Theatre

(44,048)

0

17,922

26,000

(127)

Civil Infrastructure

(9,317,219)

1,598,454

630,291

50,000

(7,038,474)

Community Works

(159,648)

140,317

12,555

 

(6,776)

Council Election

(235,385)

(112,845)

49,085

 

(299,146)

Economic Development

(419,160)

60,000

349,832

 

(9,328)

Emergency Events Reserve

(639,548)

(120,142)

(275,120)

 

(1,034,810)

Employee Leave Entitlements Gen Fund

(3,453,655)

0

0

 

(3,453,655)

Environmental Conservation

(116,578)

41,578

0

 

(75,000)

Event Attraction

(491,893)

0

210,249

 

(281,644)

Financial Assistance Grants in Advance

(8,536,837)

0

8,536,837

 

0

Grant Co-Funding

(500,000)

0

0

 

(500,000)

Gravel Pit Restoration

(816,897)

3,333

0

 

(813,564)

Information Services

(1,835,475)

(507,158)

133,683

45,960

(2,162,990)

Insurance Variations

(50,000)

0

0

 

(50,000)

Internal Loans

(3,649,517)

(201,545)

(114,936)

 

(3,965,998)

Lake Albert Improvements

(105,839)

(21,366)

0

 

(127,205)

Library

0

(171,724)

0

 

(171,724)

Livestock Marketing Centre

(6,032,463)

685,981

2,177,470

 

(3,169,012)

 


 

 

 

CLOSING BALANCE 2021/22

ADOPTED RESERVE TRANSFERS 2022/23

BUDGET VARIATIONS APPROVED UP TO COUNCIL MEETING 17.10.2022

PROPOSED CHANGES for Council Resolution*

BALANCE AS AT 31 OCTOBER 2022

Museum Acquisitions

(39,378)

10,000

15,000

 

(14,378)

Net Zero Emissions

(394,001)

0

321,212

 

(72,790)

Oasis Reserve

(1,085,465)

(63,900)

665,904

 

(483,460)

Parks & Recreation Projects

(1,356,795)

(33,906)

631,822

 

(758,879)

Parks Water

0

(180,000)

0

 

(180,000)

Planning Legals

(100,000)

0

0

 

(100,000)

Plant Replacement

(4,335,819)

(723,537)

2,557,372

 

(2,501,984)

Project Carryovers

(3,098,056)

0

3,098,056

 

0

Public Art

(211,155)

106,595

34,893

 

(69,667)

Sister Cities

(50,000)

10,000

7,000

 

(33,000)

Stormwater Drainage

(158,178)

0

48,000

 

(110,178)

Strategic Real Property

(766,176)

0

69,510

 

(696,666)

Subdivision Tree Planting

(368,640)

20,000

0

 

(348,640)

Unexpended External Loans

(3,143,977)

74,744

2,977,245

 

(91,989)

Workers Compensation

(211,112)

 

50,963

 

(160,149)

Total Internally Restricted

(54,095,762)

395,070

22,534,501

121,960

(31,044,231)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Restricted

(165,555,941)

15,241,469

36,540,947

121,960

(113,651,565)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Unrestricted

(11,494,000)

0

0

0

(11,494,000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Cash, Cash Equivalents and Investments

(177,049,941)

15,241,469

36,540,947

121,960

(125,145,565)

 


 

Investment Summary as at 31 October 2022

In accordance with Regulation 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2021, details of Wagga Wagga City Council’s external investments are outlined below.

 

Institution

Rating

Closing Balance
Invested
30/09/2022
$

Closing Balance
Invested
31/10/2022
$

October
EOM
Current Yield
%

October
EOM
% of Portfolio

Investment
Date

Maturity
Date

Term
(months)

At Call Accounts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAB

AA-

121,360

220,234

2.60%

0.11%

N/A

N/A

N/A

Rabobank

A+

21

21

0.30%

0.00%

N/A

N/A

N/A

CBA

AA-

4,253,408

6,116,817

2.60%

3.18%

N/A

N/A

N/A

CBA

AA-

17,881,351

17,915,154

2.65%

9.31%

N/A

N/A

N/A

Macquarie Bank

A+

9,101,085

9,120,676

2.60%

4.74%

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total At Call Accounts

 

31,357,226

33,372,902

2.63%

17.35%

 

 

 

Short Term Deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CBA

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

2.22%

1.04%

20/04/2022

20/04/2023

12

CBA

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

3.68%

1.04%

8/06/2022

8/06/2023

12

Total Short Term Deposits