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Agenda and
Business Paper

 


Ordinary Meeting of Council

 

 

 

To be held on
Monday 23 October 2023

at 6.00pm

 

 

 

Civic Centre cnr Baylis and Morrow Streets,
Wagga Wagga NSW 2650 (PO Box 20)
P 1300 292 442
P council@wagga.nsw.gov.au


wagga.nsw.gov.au


NOTICE OF MEETING

 

The proceedings of all Council meetings in open session, including all debate and addresses by the public, are recorded (audio visual) and livestreamed on Council’s website including for the purpose of facilitating community access to meetings and accuracy of the Minutes.

 

In addition to webcasting council meetings, audio recordings of confidential sessions of Ordinary Meetings of Council are also recorded, but do not form part of the webcast.

 

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Description automatically generated with medium confidence

 


WAGGA WAGGA CITY COUNCILLORS

 

STATEMENT OF ETHICAL OBLIGATIONS

Councillors are reminded of their Oath or Affirmation of Office made under Secion 233A of the Local Government Act 1993 and their obligation under Council’s Code of Conduct to disclose and appropriately manage Conflicts of Interest.

 

QUORUM

The quorum for a meeting of the Council is a majority of the Councillors of the Council who hold office for the time being who are eligible to vote at the meeting.

 

 


Reports submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council to be held on Monday 23 October 2023.

Ordinary Meeting of Council AGENDA AND BUSINESS PAPER

Monday 23 October 2023

ORDER OF BUSINESS:

CLAUSE               PRECIS                                                                                            PAGE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY                                                                                   3

REFLECTION                                                                                                                         3

APOLOGIES                                                                                                                          3

Confirmation of Minutes

CM-1           ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 9 OCTOBER 2023                                          3

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST                                                                                            3

Mayoral Minutes

MM-1           RIVERINA WATER COUNTY COUNCIL - APPOINTMENT OF COUNCILLOR                  4

Reports from Staff

RP-1            DA22/0460.01 - Review of Determination -Two Storey Childcare Centre, demolition of existing structures, carparking area and fencing at 32 Halloran Street, Turvey Park, NSW 2650. Lot 29 Sec B DP 37333                 7

RP-2            PROPOSED WAGGA WAGGA DEVELOPMENT CONTROL PLAN
AMENDMENT - SECTION 10.6 ENTERPRISE CORRIDOR ZONE                        
12

RP-3            WAGGA WAGGA DEVELOPMENT CONTROL PLAN 2010 AMENDMENT 27 - ADMINISTRATIVE AND POLICY POSITION REVIEW                                          16

RP-4            PLANNING PROPOSAL LEP23/0001 - PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE WAGGA WAGGA LOCAL ENVIRONMENTAL PLAN 2010 FOR REZONING AND RECLASSIFICATION OF LAND LOCATED ON BOWEN PLACE AND BOYD PLACE, TOLLAND, WAGGA WAGGA                                                                              20

RP-5            RESPONSE TO NOTICE OF MOTION - SHORT STAY ACCOMMODATION         32

RP-6            196 BOOROOMA STREET - DEDICATION OF COMMUNITY LAND AS PUBLIC ROAD                                                                                                                 48

RP-7            FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE REPORT AS AT 30 SEPTEMBER 2023                 52

RP-8            REQUESTS FOR FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE - SECTION 356                               86

RP-9            Appointment of Councillor Representatives Due to Resigation            98

RP-10          Public Interest Disclosure Policy (POL 097)                                        102

RP-11          COUNCIL MEETING DATES - 2024                                                                     150

RP-12          RESOLUTIONS AND NOTICES OF MOTIONS REGISTERS                                 153

RP-13          QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE                                                                                215    

Confidential Reports

CONF-1       RFT2024-10 GEOTECHNICAL TESTING SERVICES                                           218


 

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY

Wagga Wagga City Council acknowledges the traditional custodians of the land, the Wiradjuri people, and pays respect to Elders past, present and future and extends our respect to all First Nations Peoples in Wagga Wagga.

We recognise and respect their cultural heritage, beliefs and continuing connection with the land and rivers. We also recognise the resilience, strength and pride of the Wiradjuri and First Nations communities

 

 

REFLECTION

Councillors, let us in silence reflect upon our responsibilities to the community which we represent, and to all future generations and faithfully, and impartially, carry out the functions, powers, authorities and discretions vested in us, to the best of our skill and judgement.

 

 

APOLOGIES

 

 

Confirmation of Minutes

CM-1              ORDINARY COUNCIL MEETING - 9 OCTOBER 2023       

Recommendation

That the Minutes of the proceedings of the Ordinary Council Meeting held on 9 October 2023 be confirmed as a true and accurate record.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

Minutes - 9 October 2023

219

 

 

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 23 October 2023

MM-1

 

procedural motion

PM-1              RIVERINA WATER COUNTY COUNCIL - APPOINTMENT OF COUNCILLOR

Author:          Nicole Johnson   

Executive:    Scott Gray

         

 

Summary:

Councillor Dan Hayes has resigned from Council effective 20 October 2023, leaving a vacancy on Riverina Water County Council.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

b       conduct an election to appoint one Councillor to the board of Riverina Water County Council

b       note that in accordance with the Local Government (General) Regulations 2021, the General Manager is the Returning Officer for the election of a member to Riverina Water County Council

c        note that in the event of there being more than one candidate for the Riverina Water County Council, an election will be held in accordance with Clause 396 (Schedule 9) of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2021, and that such election is to be determined by preferential ballot

 

Report

Councillor Dan Hayes tendered his resignation from Council under Section 234 of the Local Government Act 1993 (NSW) (the Act), which has led to his resignation from Riverina Water County Council on 20 October 2023. Accordingly, it is now appropriate to elect a replacement Councillor to the board of Riverina Water County Council.

 

In the event there is more than one nominee then election is to be by preferential voting. This is a remunerated position, directly from Riverina Water County Council.

 

Riverina Water County Council has two remaining meetings scheduled for this year, on Thursday 26 October 2023 and Thursday 14 December 2023.

 

At its meeting held 10 January 2022 Council resolved to appoint Councillors T Koschel, M Henderson, D Hayes, G Davies & J McKinnon to Riverina Water County Council. 

 

In accordance with the provisions of Section 390 of the Act, Council is to elect five (5) Councillors to be members of Riverina Water County Council for a period of term, (from January 2022 to the date of the next general Local Government election to be held on 14 September 2024), with such election to be conducted in accordance with Schedule 9 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2021. 

 


 

Schedule 9 of the Regulation states (in part):

 

1     When elections to be held

 

(1)     The first ordinary election of members of a county council is to be held within 2 months of its establishment.

 

(2)     Subsequent ordinary elections are to be held within 2 months after each ordinary election of Councillors under Part 4 of Chapter 10 of the Act (Local Government Act 1993).

 

(3)     A by-election to fill an office vacated by a member is to be held within 2 months after the occurrence of the vacancy.

 

4     Returning officer

 

The General Manager of the constituent council (or a person appointed by that General Manager) is the returning officer.

 

5     Nomination

 

(1)   A Councillor of the constituent council may be nominated for election as a member of the county council.

 

(2)   The nomination:

 

(a)  may be made without notice by any Councillor of the council

(b)  is to be in writing delivered or sent to the returning officer prior to the council meeting at which the election is to be held

(c)   is not valid unless the nominee has indicated consent to the nomination in writing

 

(3)   The returning officer is to announce the names of the nominees at a council meeting.

 

6     Election

 

(1)   If the number of candidates nominated is not more than the number of vacancies to be filled, those candidates are to be declared elected.

 

(2)   If there are more candidates nominated than the number to be elected, an election is to be determined by preferential ballot. The ballot is to be conducted by the preparation, marking and counting of ballot-papers in the presence of the council.

 

7     Ballot-papers and voting

 

(1)   The ballot-papers are to contain the names of all the candidates. The Councillors are to mark their votes by placing the figures 1, 2 and so on against the various names so as to indicate the order of their preference for at least the number of candidates to be elected.

 

(2)   The formality of a ballot-paper under this Part is to be determined in accordance with clause 345 of this Regulation as if it were a ballot-paper referred to in that clause.

 

(3)   An informal ballot-paper is to be rejected at the scrutiny of votes.

 

8     Count

 

The votes are to be counted in accordance with Schedule 4 (clause 351) of this Regulation.

 

NOTE: The count is to be conducted under the optional preferential system. Details of the method of counting are contained as an attachment.

 

9     Result

 

The result of the election (including the names of the candidates elected as members) is:

 

(a)   to be declared to the Councillors by the returning officer at the council meeting where the election is held

 

(b)   to be delivered or sent to the General Manager of the county council and the Director-General

 

Financial Implications

N/A

Policy and Legislation

NSW Local Government Act 1993

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Community Leadership and Collaboration

Objective: We have strong leadership

Outcome: We have leaders that represent us

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

N/A

Internal / External Consultation

N/A

 

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 23 October 2023

RP-1

 

Reports from Staff

RP-1               DA22/0460.01 - Review of Determination -Two Storey Childcare Centre, demolition of existing structures, carparking area and fencing at 32 Halloran Street, Turvey Park, NSW 2650. Lot 29 Sec B DP 37333

Author:                        Paul O’Brien   

General Manager:    Peter Thompson

         

 

Summary:

The application seeks a review of the determination made by Council on 8 May 2023 to refuse a two-storey childcare centre with car-parking, landscaping and fencing.

 

The application includes additional information and minor amendments to the proposal in response to the original reasons for refusal.

 

The review application was publicly advertised and notified to adjoining and nearby property owners for a period of 14 days.  A total of 20 submissions were received in objection to the development. The original 48 submissions remain valid and of relevance to this assessment. Of the 20 submissions received to the review application, twelve of these had previously made a submission and the grounds of objection remained generally the same as those made to the original development application.

 

Section 8.3(6) of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act requires that, The review of a determination or decision made by a council is to be conducted by the council and not by a delegate of the council.

 

Section 1.10 of the Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010 requires any application that is the subject of 10 or more objections to be referred to Council for determination.

 

A full assessment of the review application is provided as an attachment to this report.  The assessment has considered and addressed all relevant matters raised in the submissions.

 

Based on the supporting information that has been provided in response to the reasons for refusal and the findings of the assessment report, it is recommended that the original determination be changed, and the application be approved subject to conditions.

 

Recommended conditions of consent have been included in the attached assessment report.

 


 

 

Recommendation

That Council approve DA22/0460.01 for Two Storey Childcare Centre, demolition of existing structures, carparking area and fencing at 32 Halloran Street, Turvey Park NSW 2650 (Lot 29 Section B DP3733) subject to the conditions outlined in the Section 4.15 Assessment Report.

 

Development Application Details

 

Applicant

Money Aint Got No Owners Pty Ltd

Owner

Money Aint Got No Owners Pty Ltd

Directors: Darren White & Nicholas Karpathios

Development Cost

$894,300.00

Development Description

Demolition of two existing dwellings on site, construction of two storey childcare centre with associated car-parking, driveway, landscaping and fencing.

 

Report

Key Issues

·  Response to original reasons for refusal

·  Amended details of the development application

·  Car park design and vehicle movements

·  Stormwater Management

·  Objections to the Development

·  NSW Childcare Planning Guidelines and compliance with legislation

 

Site Location

 

         


 

Assessment

 

·        The review application includes minor modifications to the design of the building; the finished floor level is increased by 700mm to ensure that the premises is not inundated during a PMF overland flood event, but the overall height of the building remains the same. The additional height is managed by a reduction in internal ceiling heights and variation to the roof pitch.

·        The review application includes stormwater management details that consist of two separate on site detention tanks. One of the proposed tanks is elevated and located above the external storage space at the southern side of the building. This tank will capture run-off from the building. There is also an underground tank in the car-park that will capture run-off from this area.

·        During the assessment of the review application Council sought an amendment to the car-park layout to include a turning bay and reduce the number of car parking spaces to eleven. The layout is compliant with applicable Australian standards.

·        In response to the reduced number of car parking spaces the applicants have agreed to reduce the maximum number of children to 44 ensuring that the number of car-parking spaces is in accordance with the WWDCP2010.

·        The site is zoned as R1 General Residential under the provisions of the WWLEP 2010. Centre based child-care facilities are specifically listed as permitted with consent in the R1 zone.

·        The site is within a residential street in proximity to a primary school. A traffic impact report prepared in support of the development application confirms that there are no adverse impacts upon the local road network as a result of the proposal.

·        Peak drop off and pick up times at the primary school differ to those at a child care centre. The street is subject to low volumes of vehicle movement and can accommodate the additional modelled car trips with no detrimental impact upon levels of service at nearby intersections.

·        The two storey nature of the building presents an alternate design to the streetscape and the increased setback of approximately 17 metres presents further variety with carparking at the front of the site. The setback allows for the building form to be recessed within views along the street and landscaping is proposed to both the front and side setbacks.  An alternative design with car-parking to the rear would offer poor functionality to the centre.

·        The impacts of the development have been considered as part of the attached s4.15 report and deemed to be acceptable.

·        A number of submissions were received in objection to the both the original and the review application. Generally, the submissions related to the scale of the development and traffic and parking concerns. The submissions have been addressed in detail under section (d) of the attached s4.15 report.

 

Appropriate conditions of consent are included to manage and mitigate the impacts of development. Subject to compliance with the conditions there are no anticipated impacts that would warrant refusal of the development application.

 

Reasons for Approval

 

1.      The proposed development is consistent with the provisions of SEPP (Transport and Infrastructure) 2021 and the NSW Child Care Planning Guidelines 2021.

2.      The proposed development is consistent with the provisions of the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010.

3.      The proposed development is generally consistent with the objectives and controls of the Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010.

4.      The impacts of the proposed development are acceptable and can be managed via the recommended conditions of consent.

5.      The site is considered suitable for the proposed development and is in the public interest.

Financial Implications

N/A

Policy

State Environmental Planning Policy (Transport and Infrastructure) 2021

Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010

Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Growing Economy

Objective: Wagga Wagga is an attractive location for people to live, work and invest

Encourage and support investment to develop Wagga Wagga

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

Approval of the application is not considered to raise risk management issues for Council as the proposed development is consistent with SEPP (Transport and Infrastructure) 2021, LEP and DCP controls.

Internal / External Consultation

Full details of the consultation that was carried out as part of the development application assessment is contained in the attached s4.15 Report.

 

Mail

Traditional Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news

Media release

Media opportunity

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meeting(s)

Community meeting(s)

Stakeholder workshop(s)

Drop-in session(s)

Survey/feedback form(s)

Have your Say

Email newsletter

Social media

Website

Inform

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

x

Consult

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

x

Involve

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

DA22/0460.01 - s4.15 Assessment Report - Provided under separate cover

 

2.

DA22/0460.01 - Architectural Plans - Provided under separate cover

 

3.

DA22/0460.01 - Landscape plan and schedule - Provided under separate cover

 

4.

DA22-0460.01 - Stormwater layout plan - Provided under separate cover

 

5.

DA22/0460.01 - Statement of Environmental Effects - Provided under separate cover

 

6.

DA22/0460.01 - Environmental Noise Assessment and addendum letter - Provided under separate cover

 

7.

DA22/0460.01 - Parking Certification,Traffic Report and addendum letter - Provided under separate cover

 

8.

DA22/0460.01 - Flood risk management report - Provided under separate cover

 

9.

DA22/0460.01 - Redacted Submissions - Provided under separate cover

 

10.

DA22/0460.01 - Redacted submissions to original application - Provided under separate cover

 

11.

DA22/0460.01 - Original s4.15 Assessment Report to Council(DA22/0460) - May 2023 - Provided under separate cover

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 23 October 2023

RP-2

 

RP-2               PROPOSED WAGGA WAGGA DEVELOPMENT CONTROL PLAN AMENDMENT - SECTION 10.6 ENTERPRISE CORRIDOR ZONE

Author:                        Paul O’Brien

General Manager:    Peter Thompson

         

 

Summary:

At the 4 September 2023 Ordinary Council meeting, Council received a report outlining a draft amendment to the Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan (WWDCP) 2010. The amendment relates to land formerly zoned B6 Enterprise Corridor, and presently zoned E3 Productivity Support, on both sides of the Sturt Highway between Tasman Road and Gumly Gumly.

 

Council resolved to place the draft amendment to the Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010 on public exhibition for the period 8 September 2023 to 6 October 2023.

 

Eight submissions were received during the public exhibition period. These submissions raised matters in relation to a pending Development Application under assessment on the land, and the overarching zoning and the precinct, and did not directly relate to the proposed Development Control Plan amendment.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a       note the submissions received in relation to the proposed ‘Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan Amendment – Section 10.6 Enterprise Corridor Zone’ during the exhibition period from 8 September 2023 to 6 October 2023

b       adopt the ‘Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan Amendment – Section 10.6 Enterprise Corridor Zone’ as exhibited, and as set out in the attachment to this report, with a commencement date of 4 December 2023, in accordance with Clause 1.6A of the Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010

 

Report

Background

At the 4 September 2023 Ordinary Council meeting, Council received a report outlining a draft amendment to the Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan (WWDCP) 2010. The amendment relates to land formerly zoned B6 Enterprise Corridor, and presently zoned E3 Productivity Support, on both sides of the Sturt Highway between Tasman Road and Gumly Gumly.

 

The WWDCP 2010 presently contains controls, objectives and principles for this area in Section 10 under the part titled Enterprise Corridor Zone. The purpose of these controls, objectives and principles are, among a range of factors, to ensure service roads are provided to provide alternate access to the highway, and to ensure that development provides an attractive entry to the city.

 


 

Whilst the intent of the principles, objectives and controls are clear, it has become apparent as the precinct has developed since 2020, that additional reinforcement of this intent would be beneficial in assisting persons carrying out development in this area in navigating the planning framework, and ensuring that the strategic intent of the area is realised.

 

At the 4 September 2023 meeting Council resolved to place the draft amendment to the Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010 on public exhibition for the period 8 September 2023 to 6 October 2023.

 

Council also resolved to receive a further report following public exhibition addressing any submissions made, and proposing adoption of the development control plan amendment subject to any recommended amendments deemed to be substantial and requiring a further public exhibition period.

 

 

Proposed amended Appendix G as exhibited

 

 

Example of alternate intersection locations

 

The plate above illustrates proposed amended Appendix G and that there are also alternative arrangements for intersection locations, dependant on where development of the land commences first. Should land in the middle of the northern section of the zone be developed first an intersection would be required adjacent to the land being developed and provisions made to allow continuation of the service road servicing all future allotments facing the highway.

 

Submissions

Eight submissions were received during the public exhibition period. These submissions raised matters in relation to a pending Development Application under assessment on the land, and the overarching zoning and the precinct, and did not directly relate to the proposed Development Control Plan amendment.

 

No submissions were received in relation to the proposed additional clauses for Precinct 7 in Section 10.6 of the WWDCP 2010, nor the amended map in Appendix G of Section 10.

 

Redacted copies of the submissions are attached to this report.

Financial Implications

N/A


 

Policy and Legislation

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2021

Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010

 

Link to Strategic Plan

The Environment

Objective: Future growth and development of Wagga Wagga is planned for in a sustainable manner

Ensure sustainable urban development

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

It has become apparent as “Precinct 7” has developed since 2020 that additional reinforcement of the intent of the controls for this precinct in the WWDCP 2010 would be beneficial in assisting persons carrying out development in this area in navigating the planning framework and ensuring that the strategic intent of the area is correctly realised. Not carrying out the amendments would risk proponents misinterpreting the developed outcomes intended when making a development application.

Internal / External Consultation

The DCP amendment was subject to public consultation for 28 days with notice published on the Council website. The following provides an overview of the engagement methods that were used during public exhibition:

 

 

Mail

Traditional Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news

Media release

Media opportunity

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meeting(s)

Community meeting(s)

Stakeholder workshop(s)

Drop-in session(s)

Survey/feedback form(s)

Have your Say

Email newsletter

Social media

Website

Inform

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consult

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

x

Involve

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other methods (please list specific details below)

 

 


 

Attachments

1.

Proposed Section 10 of the Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010 - Provided under separate cover

 

2.

WWDCP 2010 Amendment 26 - Redacted Submissions - Provided under separate cover

 

  


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 23 October 2023

RP-3

 

RP-3               WAGGA WAGGA DEVELOPMENT CONTROL PLAN 2010 AMENDMENT 27 - ADMINISTRATIVE AND POLICY POSITION REVIEW

Author:                        Paul O’Brien   

General Manager:    Peter Thompson

         

 

Summary:

The Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010 presently contains a range of matters that are out of date, incorrect, require further clarification, or need to be amended to reflect the policy position of Council. An omnibus amendment is proposed to resolve these matters, where possible. The goal of the amendment is to ensure the WWDCP 2010 remains a contemporary and usable document, while the new, comprehensive DCP for Wagga Wagga is prepared.

 

Overall, the amendments are not expected to significantly alter how developments are assessed, as the changes are generally consistent with how the WWDCP 2010 is currently consistently applied.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a       endorse the draft amendment to the Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010 for public exhibition purposes for a period of 28 days from 27 October 2023 and invite public submissions until 24 November 2023

b       receive a further report after the public exhibition period:

i         addressing any submissions made in respect of the development control plan amendment

ii        proposing adoption of the development control plan amendment unless there are any recommended amendments deemed to be substantial and requiring a further public exhibition period

 

Report

Background

The Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010 was adopted by Council over 13 years ago. Whilst there have been 25 previous amendments (and a further amendment relating to the Gumly Gumly enterprise corridor area under consideration), these have largely focused on addressing specific issues and adding new controls for rezoned land rather than general maintenance of the document to ensure it remains current in terms of related legislation, practice, applied interpretation and decisions of Council. There are also a range of unresolved errors within the WWDCP 2010.

 

The proposed amendment is an omnibus amendment that proposes to resolve these matters where possible. The goal is to ensure the WWDCP 2010 remains a contemporary and usable document, while the new, comprehensive DCP for Wagga Wagga is prepared.

 

Overall, the amendments are not expected to significantly alter how developments are assessed, as the changes are generally consistent with how the WWDCP 2010 is currently consistently applied.

 

Proposed Amendments

The proposed amendments are set out in the attached documents and broadly fall into the following categories:

 

Legislative change

The WWDCP 2010 contains a range of references to legislation that has changed. Examples include the former Section 79C of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act and various renamed State Environmental Planning Policies.

 

Legislative change also has led to the need for amendments where controls are inconsistent with higher order legislation. Examples include the maximum number of farm stay accommodation units, changes to the planning framework in Bomen, and consolidation of some business and industrial zones.

 

Amendments proposed seek to rectify incorrect references, and update controls to reflect legislative changes. Unnecessary content, which relates to legislative arrangements outside of the DCP, has also been proposed to be removed to reduce the potential for future legislative inconsistency.

 

Clarification of controls

Some controls due to poor drafting, are unclear in intent or how they are to be applied. Others are difficult to enforce compliance in practice, due to reasons such as inconsistency with other controls, unreasonableness, or unintended consequences.

 

Examples of these include the 40m minimum frontage for lots in Uranquinty, which was poorly drafted resulting in confusion regarding the exact land to which it applies. Amendments have been proposed to resolve this consistent with previous decisions of the full Council. Other poorly drafted controls include the car parking requirements in the CBD, which when read literally does not result in the intended outcome, and the site cover control in residential area, which is inconsistent as developments shift between land uses and lot sizes.

 

Errors and incorrect information

There are a number of errors and items of incorrect information in the DCP. Examples include an example of a preferred solution for parking for health consulting rooms which is inconsistent with the associated controls.

 

Other errors include controls which are essentially unenforceable, such as controls that relate to the content of signage, as this is expressly outside the scope of planning legislation, the colour of buildings outside the conservation area, where painting can usually be carried out as exempt development, and fencing controls in the villages which are contrary to what can generally be constructed as exempt development.

 

Outdated information

Given the time that has elapsed since the making of the original DCP, some provisions have become outdated and superseded. These include many of the controls adopted by reference to the 2005 DCP, which prior to this review, had not been reviewed for 18 years. For those controls that remain relevant, provisions have been proposed to be incorporated into the WWDCP 2010.

 

Other examples of this are links and references to superseded documents.

 

Policy position

Some amendments relate to controls which have been consistently applied in a particular manner or are consistently varied. Examples of the interpretation of the maximum panel area for signage, which has been taken in decisions, including by those of the full Council, to relate to each individual side of a pylon sign, despite the control not expressly stating this.

 

Other examples of policy position in the amendments are the inclusion of controls giving force to the Tolland Concept Masterplan, and clarification of the circumstances where a masterplan is required in MU1 and E3 zones.

 

Confusing, unnecessary, inappropriate or irrelevant content

There is a substantial volume of content in the DCP that are not controls, objectives or principles, and essentially comprises background information. Often this information contains detail that relates to documents such as the LEP, which can be wrong, dated, and is neither necessary nor appropriate in the DCP. Examples of this include discussion on the permissibility of land uses in particular zones.

 

Further information

Attached to this report are two draft versions of the WWDCP 2010. The first is a “track changes” version, which highlights the proposed amendments. The second is a “clean” version, with all changes made, and represents to proposed final document. Also attached to this report is a summary document outlining the proposed changes. This comprises two parts. The first part is the overall summary of the changes, whilst the second part relates specially to the provisions of the WWDCP 2005 that are called up by the WWDCP 2010.

 

Financial Implications

N/A

Policy and Legislation

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Environmental Planning and Assessment Regulation 2021

Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Growing Economy

Objective: Wagga Wagga is a hub for activity

Facilitate the development of vibrant precincts

 


 

Risk Management Issues for Council

It is important that the DCP remains a contemporary document that is usable and is able to be easily enforced. Where the controls and the intent of the DCP is unclear, it is more difficult to ensure that development meets the strategic intent of the Council, creates uncertainty for the community and developers, and creates additional opportunity for decisions to be appealed to the Land and Environment Court.

Internal / External Consultation

The DCP amendment will be the subject of public consultation for 28 days with notice published on the Council website, with all relevant information made available to the public.

 

The following provides an overview of the engagement methods that will be utilised during public exhibition:

 

 

Mail

Traditional Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news

Media release

Media opportunity

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meeting(s)

Community meeting(s)

Stakeholder workshop(s)

Drop-in session(s)

Survey/feedback form(s)

Have your Say

Email newsletter

Social media

Website

Inform

 

 

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consult

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

x

x

Involve

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other methods (please list specific details below)

 

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan Amendment 27 - Amendment Summary Sheet - Provided under separate cover

 

2.

Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010 - Draft Amendment 27 - Full Version Incorporating Amendments - Provided under separate cover

 

3.

Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010 - Draft Amendment 27 - Full Version With Track Changes - Provided under separate cover

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 23 October 2023

RP-4

 

RP-4               PLANNING PROPOSAL LEP23/0001 - PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE WAGGA WAGGA LOCAL ENVIRONMENTAL PLAN 2010 FOR REZONING AND RECLASSIFICATION OF LAND LOCATED ON BOWEN PLACE AND BOYD PLACE, TOLLAND, WAGGA WAGGA

Author:         Siobhan Nielsen 

Executive:    John Sidgwick

         

 

Summary:

Council is in receipt of a Planning Proposal to amend the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010. The proposal seeks to rezone part Lot 12, DP1187387 from RE1 Public Recreation to R1 General Residential, and reclassify the land from community land to operational land. 

 

The recommendation is to proceed with the Planning Proposal and request a Gateway Determination with the Department of Planning and Environment. 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council: 

a       support Planning Proposal LEP23/0001 to amend the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010 

b       submit the Planning Proposal LEP23/0001 to the Department of Planning and Environment for Gateway Determination 

c        subject to endorsement of the Planning Proposal, undertake public exhibition and consultation with a further report to be prepared after the public exhibition period addressing any submissions made in respect of the Planning Proposal 

d       note that any decision on the use or sale of Council owned land will be subject to a separate Council report  

 

Report

Application Details 

 

Submitted Proposal: 

Amendment to the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010 to reclassify land and amend zoning. 

Applicant 

Salvestro Planning on behalf of Mr Tony Balding 

Land Owners: 

Wagga Wagga City Council 

 

The Proposal 

 

Council is in receipt of a Planning Proposal to amend the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010. The proposal seeks to rezone part Lot 12, DP1187387 from RE1 Public Recreation to R1 General Residential and reclassify the land from community land to operational land. 

 

 

In 2023, Council was approached by the landowner adjoining the laneway at Bowen Place enquiring about the proposed future use of the land and whether Council would be prepared to consider disposal of the land. Staff advised that the property was classified as community land and that under provisions of the Local Government Act 1993, Council was prevented from disposing of the land whilst it was classified as community land. 

 

The landowner subsequently lodged a planning proposal to rezone the land from RE1 Public Recreation to R1 General Residential and to reclassify the land from community land to operational land. As part of Council’s initial scoping advice to the applicant in relation to the planning proposal, it was recommended that the adjacent laneway on Boyd Place also be included in the proposal to enable more efficient planning and use of Council resources.

 

The proposed amendments are shown in the maps below: 

Figure 1 and 2: Proposal outcomes for reclassification and rezoning respectively 

 

The application and supporting documents are provided under separate covers (see attachments). 

 

Site and Locality 

 

Council owns both sites, with Bowen Place approximately 265m² in area and Boyd Place 171 m² in area. They are located approximately 6.3km south of the CBD (11 minutes drive). They are recreational in nature and are utilised as informal pedestrian laneways between the cul-de-sac and the active travel path.  

 

The existing parcel (see Figure 3 below) is zoned RE1 Public Recreation and is an open space corridor which functions to complement the active travel path. The character of the local area is largely low density urban and comprises a mix of social housing and private housing. R1 General Residential zoning exists to the north of the site, with SP2 Infrastructure zoning to the south (see Figures 1 and 2 above). The site adjoins Red Hill Road to the south, and there is an active travel path that runs parallel. Jubilee Park is situated to the south of Red Hill Road.  

 

Figure 3: Aerial view of the subject land. Source: Sixmaps. 

 

Key Considerations 

 

The Planning Proposal has been assessed against Council’s strategies, policies and guidelines, the 2023 NSW Local Environmental Plan Making Guideline and the Ministerial Directions. The key considerations are identified below:  

 

1.         Precinct-level Approach 

 

When considering changes to planning provisions, consideration is to be given to applying the changes to a larger precinct, rather than solely applying at a smaller scale, which achieves site-specific outcomes only. The precinct-level approach enables Council to better plan for infrastructure servicing and delivery and facilitates efficient planning. As such, as part of Council’s initial scoping advice to the applicant it was recommended that the adjacent laneway on Boyd Place be similarly included in the proposal to enable more efficient planning and use of Council resources. 

 

2.         Council’s Vision of Strategic Intent 

 

There is general support for the Planning Proposal to rezone land from RE1 to R1 in both local and regional strategies. 

 

·              Riverina Murray Regional Plan 2041 

 

The Riverina Murray Regional Plan outlines a goal to promote the growth of regional cities. The proposal is consistent with this plan due to the opportunity to facilitate additional housing.  

 


 

 

·              Wagga Wagga Local Strategic Planning Statement – Wagga Wagga 2040 

 

The Wagga Wagga Local Strategic Planning Statement – Wagga Wagga 2040 (LSPS) was adopted on 8 February 2021 and provides a blueprint for how and where Wagga Wagga will grow into the future. It sets Council’s 20-year vision for land use planning under key themes and principles. The proposal is consistent with this plan due to the opportunity to facilitate additional housing. 

 

3.         Infrastructure 

 

One of the key issues to consider with Local Environmental Plan (LEP) amendments is the impact of any proposal on existing infrastructure and the ability of existing networks to cope with increased demands. The site is in an existing urban environment and there is opportunity to connect to existing services and infrastructure including roads, reticulated water, stormwater, sewer and waste collection services. Other infrastructure networks and services, including public transport, waste management/recycling, health, education, emergency, mail and other community services are established in the local area and are accessible to the subject sites. The Planning Proposal’s intent is to enable at least one additional dwelling on the Bowen place subject site, and it also provides the opportunity to facilitate at least one additional dwelling on the Boyd Place subject site in the future, with both sites having minimal impact on public infrastructure.  

 

4.         LEP Provisions  

 

·              Existing provisions 

 

The site is currently zoned RE1 Public Recreation and is classified as community land. 

 

·              Proposed provisions 

 

The amendment will rezone the land to R1 General Residential and reclassify the land to operational land. The proposed changes to the LEP may facilitate additional dwellings.

 

5.         Development Control Plan  

 

Future development of the subject land will be undertaken in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Wagga Wagga Development Control Plan 2010 (DCP). 

 

6.         Additional Considerations 

 

Urban Design and Access  

Pedestrian movement and access corridors within residential housing estates are an integral part of good urban design. However, the two subject laneways are located at the end of cul de sacs and lack clear legibility, are not signposted, do not have paving or lighting and do not connect well with the existing pedestrian network (see Figures 4-6 below).

 

Figure 4: Site Photos Bowen Place 

Figure 5: Site Photos Bowen Place 

 

Figure 6: Site Photo Boyd Place 

While, the laneways can be used to support movement and connectivity, the loss of these laneways does not significantly affect access to the balance of the open space corridor off Red Hill Road and Glenfield Road, with access retained from Brooks Circuit (approximately 5-minute walk west of Boyd Place) and Ramus St to the east (approximately 3-minute walk east of Bowen Place). Access to the cul-de-sacs in the event of emergencies is also maintained via these routes.

In this instance, the thoroughfares do not appear to provide additional amenity or benefit to the community in the context of urban design principles (such as movement and connectivity, and access to greenspace) and Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles. 

It is noted that as part of the Tolland Renewal Project, the Land and Housing Corporation (LAHC) plan to reconnect a number of cul de sacs within the Tolland Estate as part of the Masterplan. The size and irregular shape of Bowen Place and Boyd place make such a connection unfeasible.

Crime 

 

According to NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research (BOCSAR) the area around the laneways is a city hotspot for malicious damage to property, break and enters and assault. A search of the customer enquiry database indicates that the laneways have been a resource burden on Council in terms of complaints from customers in and around the laneways relating to rubbish dumping and requests for maintenance. This is consistent with the submission from the Riverina Police District, who are supportive of the closure of the laneways (see Attachment 5). The Riverina Police District submission references research that suggests mixed use laneways in primarily residential areas facilitate crime. Local Police identify these laneways are used to evade Police and are sites that attract litter and graffiti.  

 

This information indicates that the laneways have been a resource burden on Council and lane closures in these locations could reduce opportunities for rubbish dumping, anti-social behaviours, and assist Police with crime prevention.  

 

Statutory Planning Considerations

 

Internal feedback has indicated that alternative land uses for these parts of Lot 12, DP1187387 are not suitable given the lot size, zoning and configuration of the allotments. The Boyd Place laneway has potential for a dwelling extension or dual occupancy at 4 or 5 Boyd Place. The Bowen Place laneway has potential for expansion of a multi-dwelling development at 4 Bowen Place or a dwelling extension or dual occupancy at 3 Bowen Place. On balance, based on the feasible land use options available to the sites, it is considered this proposal would enable a beneficial planning outcome for Council, by supplementing the development opportunities for the adjoining land.

 

The Development Application on the adjacent lot to the west of the Bowen Place laneway was for installation of two manufactured dwellings (dual occupancy) and 3 lot community title subdivision (DA22/0383). Determined 2/11/2022, multi-residential development category.

 

Economic Implications

 

A future sale of the subject sites to facilitate residential opportunities will create economic opportunities through the construction process. The sale of the subject sites to adjoining landowners will create community benefit.

Reclassification

 

This Planning Proposal will facilitate a reclassification and rezoning of the site to enable future residential opportunities. The LEP practice note ‘Classification and reclassification of public land through a local environmental plan’ has been considered in relation to reclassification of land through an LEP. This document clarifies issues arising in relation to public reserve status and any interests affecting the land.

 

The reclassification of the site will enable Council to consider disposing of the site, which will result in a loss of community classified land. The reclassification will require a community hearing to be undertaken to ensure community members can present their concerns on the reclassification and potential loss of community land. This will be conditioned as part of the Gateway Determination if approved by NSW Department of Planning and Environment. It is noted that the practice note specifies the proposal must be exhibited for at least 28 days. A public hearing must be held and a further 21 days public notice needs to be given before the hearing. This provides the community an opportunity to discuss issues with an independent person in a public forum. If the proposal is supported and the plan is made, the sale of the land will be facilitated by Council’s property team.

 

Loss of Public Open Space

 

As the proposed land is currently being used for the purposes of a laneway, it is considered that the loss of public open space is minor, and from a social and economic perspective, the current use is not considered the best planning outcome for the land. The proposal will result in a negligible loss of open space as access to the active travel path, Red Hill Road and Jubilee Park can occur via Ramus Street. Urban design considerations have been explored as part of the planning assessment. Selling the land would remove the ongoing maintenance burden for council and has the potential to reduce CPTED concerns. The proceeds from the potential sale of the lots will be invested in the community.

 

Tolland Renewal Masterplan

 

The Tolland Renewal Masterplan was not initially able to be shared with Council by Land and Housing Corporation (LAHC) due to confidentiality reasons during the initial stages of the assessment. During this time the Planning Proposal was referred to LAHC. No comment was received, nor any objection raised. As there has been no objection to the proposal by LAHC, the proposal does not appear to be inconsistent with the draft Tolland Renewal Masterplan, as per the analysis below. There will be additional opportunity for comment at the public exhibition stage of the Planning Proposal process. The benefit of proceeding with the amendments proposed by this application is that it may have less risk than if the amendments were to be incorporated into a future Planning Proposal associated with the Tolland Renewal Masterplan.

 

The Tolland Renewal Masterplan is currently on public exhibition between 11 September to 24 October 2023. As can be seen in Figure 7, Boyd Place is shown as connecting through to the eastern Jordan Place. This is not inconsistent with the Planning Proposal. Bowen Place is still reflected as a cul-de-sac, which aligns with the Planning Proposal. The proposed land use in the Masterplan appears to be residential and as such the proposed reclassification and rezoning appears to be consistent with the draft Masterplan.

 

 

Figure 7 Landscape Masterplan extracted from Draft Concept Masterplan – Tolland Renewal Project 

 

Figure 8 Neighbourhood Masterplan extracted from Draft Concept Masterplan – Tolland Renewal Project 

 

Disposal Process 

 

The process for disposing of Council owned land is outlined in Council’s Acquisition, Disposal and Management of Land Policy POL 038. The policy restates the legislative position that Council cannot deal with community land other than to become or be added to a Crown reserve or National Park, and therefore a reclassification is necessary to facilitate this course of action.

 

The policy provides that disposal of land should occur at market value, and by open competitive processes unless exceptional circumstances warrant disposal by means of direct negotiations. One such exceptional circumstance is where the only potential purchaser is the adjoining owner(s). In this case, the size of the subject sites limits the development potential of the land by third parties. This may be an issue for consideration in this case.

 

A further report providing a detailed disposal brief and recommendations as to the proposed disposal strategy will be provided to Council for consideration if the Planning Proposal is supported.

 

Although the Planning Proposal seeks to rezone and reclassify two parts of Lot 12, DP1187387, there is currently active interest in the potential disposal of the Bowen Place subject site.

Conclusion: 

 

The submitted Planning Proposal seeks to amend the Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010 by rezoning part of the subject land to R1 General Residential and reclassifying part of the subject land as operational land. 

 

The two sites have the potential to be infill sites in close proximity to existing services. The Planning Proposal may facilitate higher density development in the area and may provide additional residential options.  

 

The proposal is supported for the following reasons: 

 

·    It creates an opportunity for new infill development within the existing urban area. 

·    It provides benefits to the broader community. 

·    It is consistent with the relevant strategic documents. 

·    It is consistent with Council’s vision and strategic intent. 

·    It is consistent with relevant S9.1 Ministerial Directions and SEPPs. 

·    The investigation of the subject land provided with the application is sufficient to support the Planning Proposal and forward the proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment seeking Gateway Determination. 

 

It is recommended that Council endorse the Planning Proposal and forward it to the NSW Department of Planning and Environment seeking Gateway Determination. 

 

Financial Implications

The application has been submitted with the applicable Standard LEP Amendment fee of $11,400. The proponent has paid this fee. 

 

 

Policy and Legislation

 

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

Wagga Wagga Local Environmental Plan 2010 

Chapter 15, Part 8, Division 2 of the Local Government Act 1993 

 

Link to Strategic Plan

The Environment

Objective: Future growth and development of Wagga Wagga is planned for in a sustainable manner

Ensure sustainable urban development

 


 

Risk Management Issues for Council

An approval of the proposal may be subject to public scrutiny during the public consultation process and may put additional pressure on Council to consider the increase of density around the central business district. 

 

Refusal of the application may result in an appeal process. The applicant can appeal Council’s decision by submitting the Planning Proposal to the Department of Planning and Environment through the Rezoning Review process. 

 

Internal / External Consultation

A Councillor workshop was held on 16 September where officers presented the Planning Proposal to Councillors.  

 

Internal referral occurred. There is support for the proposal to proceed. 

 

Formal public consultation with the general public and relevant referral agencies specified by the conditions of the Gateway will occur after the Gateway Determination. 

 

As this proposal includes a reclassification of community land to operational, a public hearing will be conditioned as part of any Gateway Determination. The public hearing will be chaired by an independent person and will enable the opportunity for affected community members to raise concerns in a public forum. The independent chair will prepare a report with recommendations based on the public hearing. In accordance with the Practice note PN 16-001 - Classification and reclassification of public land through and environmental plan - the exhibition period is a minimum of 28 days with a further 21 days public notice required for the public hearing.  

 

Proposed consultation methods are indicated in the table below. 

 

 

Mail

Traditional Media

Community Engagement

Digital

Rates notices insert

Direct mail

Letterbox drop

Council news

Media release

Media opportunity

TV/radio advertising

One-on-one meeting(s)

Community meeting(s)

Stakeholder workshop(s)

Drop-in session(s)

Survey/feedback form(s)

Have your Say

Email newsletter

Social media

Website

Inform

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consult

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

Involve

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other methods (please list specific details below)

 

 

 

Attachments

 

1.

LEP23/0001 Planning Proposal - Provided under separate cover

 

2.

LEP23/0001 Infrastructure Services Mapping - Provided under separate cover

 

3.

LEP23/0001 Information Checklist - Provided under separate cover

 

4.

LEP23/0001 Police Submission - Provided under separate cover

 

5.

LEP23/0001 Planning Proposal Application - Provided under separate cover

 

6.

LEP23/0001 Title Search and Deposited Plan - Provided under separate cover

 

7.

LEP23/0001 Planning Proposal Assessment Report - Provided under separate cover

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 23 October 2023

RP-5

 

RP-5               RESPONSE TO NOTICE OF MOTION - SHORT STAY ACCOMMODATION

Author:         Andrew Stockman 

Executive:    John Sidgwick

         

 

Summary:

·     Rental market conditions in Wagga Wagga remain tight driven mainly by the supply-demand imbalance caused by large population gains outstripping construction of new homes.

·     The contribution from the listed short stay accommodation market to the supply mismatch is small (just 1% of existing total stock and 3.3% of rental stock).

·     Any interventions by Council from the introduction of new fees and charges for short stay providers would have limited effect on supply shortfalls if all those properties converted to rental stock (< 1 year of stock).

·     Any intervention from fees or charges would raise limited net funds for Council (estimated at between $100,000-$250,000 revenue even assuming a high registration fee or surcharge of $1,000 per property and not factoring in enforcement costs).

·     The NSW Government is actively considering the introduction of a whole-of- State levy (similar to the Victorian Government’s new budget short stay tax policy) or a bed tax.

·     New commercial short stay accommodation fees and charges could cause negative spill-over effects into other key sectors including the visitor economy, Council’s ability to attract large new events, accommodation available for supporting hospital in-patients, and accommodation for key FIFO workers.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a       do not introduce a rating levy or new fee for short stay accommodation providers in the short term given the likely introduction of a NSW state-wide short stay accommodation levy similar to the scheme introduced in Victoria

b       note that any Wagga Wagga LGA specific short stay levy or fee would have limited impact on housing supply or yield limited new net revenue which could be directed at housing initiatives, and could have unintended consequences for other key sectors in the Wagga Wagga economy

c        write to Federal and State Governments to request a detailed review of the impacts of short stay accommodation on housing supply, with a specific focus on the differing market conditions and impacts on large inland regional cities

d       write to Federal and State Governments to encourage a rapid increase of public housing in Wagga Wagga and confirm how much budget and housing will be allocated in the 2023-2026 horizon to the Wagga Wagga LGA for net new public housing, buy to rent schemes and other building stimulus packages announced

e       note the development of the Wagga Wagga Housing Strategy that quantifies the current housing deficit (including public housing) and how Council actions could assist in helping other sectors deliver and close the housing supply gap

f        do not establish a housing trust for the development of affordable housing

 

Report

At the 30 January 2023 Ordinary Meeting of Council, it was resolved:

 

That Council:

a       receive a report considering the impact of Airbnb and other short stay models has on distorting rental markets, affordability, and intensifying housing shortages, and any strategies to mitigate problems that arise

b       include in the affordable housing report responding to the February 2021 notice of motion on affordable housing an evaluation of an affordable housing trust to be established by council in the near future. The purposes of such a trust would be the production of affordable housing to increase opportunities for working families and individuals to access decent affordable homes

 

This report has been produced in response to this resolution.

 

Background

 

Like other areas of Australia and New South Wales, housing and rental availability and affordability deteriorated in Wagga Wagga during the Covid lockdown periods. Supply and demand mismatches were initially driven by rapid population and household demand growth as a result of mobility restrictions during Covid. Available supply of new household construction was unable to keep pace with this net growth, reducing the available housing stock on the market and pushing up purchase and rental prices. 

 

These pressures have remained during the recovery period. The lack of mobility population driver has been replaced in the post Covid phase by rapid population growth driven by the reopening of international borders as the Federal Government boosted net inward migration numbers. With private and public housing supply unable to keep pace with strong demand, a further round of lowering stock and rising prices commenced. The population driven demand-supply mismatch in the worst instances contributed to rising homelessness numbers and lengthening Public Housing waiting lists.

 

Recent rental market evidence

(1)     Vacancy Levels

Rental Vacancies in the Wagga Wagga LGA were estimated to be 1.2% in March 2023 (Sydney CBD 1.3%). This indicates a continuation of the tight market conditions seen from March 2020, albeit with a slight easing of rental market availability conditions in recent months

 

(Source: Real Estate Institute of New South Wales)

 

 

(2)     Rental Prices

 

Median rental prices across the Wagga Wagga LGA area have risen across all types of housing from 2020, although the pace of rental price growth appears to be easing somewhat in recent months. The median rent for 2 bed houses was up 4.4% compared to a year earlier in June 2023, with 3 beds posting a 6.7% annual rise and 4 beds increasing by 7.1% year-on-year. Median rental prices for apartments climbed 9.4% annually in June 2023.

 

Source: Real Estate Institute of New South Wales.

 

Type

Median Rental Price

(weekly)

 

Growth (annual %)

2-Bed

$400

+6.7%

3-Bed

$470

+4.4%

4-Bed

$600

+7.1%

Units

$350

+9.4%

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

               

 

 

Although rental prices have increased sharply it appears the increases are in line with rental price growth in comparable Evocities (medium sized regional cities). Census data shows that the share of households in various rental price ranges is also in line with similar Evocities. 

 

 

(3)     Demand and supply mismatch

 

Tight rental market conditions during the Covid-period were driven by strong demand growth as mobility was restricted pushing up population and household growth, alongside a mismatch with available supply. Census data shows there was an increase of 2,576 households in the Wagga Wagga LGA area between the 2016-2021 period. An increase of 799 households renting was recorded in that period, though the share of households renting remained largely unchanged at 31.6% (slightly ahead of a comparable Evocities group). The share of renters in Social Housing fell from 4.9% of households in 2016 to 4.2% in 2021.

 

 

On the supply side building approval data below shows that 1870 residential buildings were approved between 2016 to 2021, pointing to a deficit of around 700 residences in the 5-year period compared to household demand growth. This supply-demand imbalance is the key driver of tight housing market conditions and the key driver of the rise in rental prices and the dwindling available stock.

 

 

Wagga Wagga LGA short stay accommodation

 

Alongside the mismatch in building supply and the rapid population/demand growth, a few other factors have been put forward as to contributing to the rental supply squeeze and the rise in rental prices and deterioration in affordability. These include at the national level the possibility of a growing short stay accommodation market replacing some of the rental supply, including in the Wagga Wagga LGA area.

 

(1) Size of short stay market

 

In the Wagga Wagga LGA area in August 2023 there were 220 full properties listed on the AIRDNA database (measured in real time commercial short stay accommodation on the Air BnB and VRBO platforms for hire). An additional 42 listings were listed for room only accommodation – total 262 properties listed across the Wagga Wagga LGA. It is noted that there could be a small number of additional properties privately listed for short stay accommodation away from the commercial sites.  

 

The size of the short stay market listed on the Air DNA database has risen only slightly from 2019. There was a rise in short stay supply between August 2018 to 2019 before the numbers fell again during the Covid lockdown in late 2021, before rising again in the second half of 2022 driven by rising listings for 2,3- and 4-bedroom houses.

 

Short stay accommodation therefore accounts for just 1% of the total housing stock in Wagga Wagga LGA, and 3.2% of all rental properties.

 

 

 

 

(2) Location of short stay accommodation

 

Data from the AIRDNA database shows that most of the supply of short-term accommodation is as expected located in the CBD area (135). 

 

 


 

(3)  Short stay occupancy rates, availability and prices

 

Average occupancy (reported by AIRDNA) throughout September 20022 to September 2023 was 69%. Occupancy rates across Short Stay accommodation varies across seasons and is in the range of 55-72%. Occupancy rates for Wagga Wagga Motels and Hotels are in the range 65-90%, with 100% occupancy during key events.

 

The average price though has risen in trend terms from 2018 from around $150 per night on average to $250 on average per night (depending on season).

 

 

Not all properties are available to rent all year around. An estimated 24.3% of the Wagga Wagga short stay market is only available for 1-90 days, 16.7% is listed for availability for between 91-180 days, 28.8% is available between 181-270 days and finally 30.2% is listed for availability between 271 and 365 days per year. 

 

(4) Short stay accommodation revenue

 

Taking all factors into account (availability, occupancy and price) monthly turnover has ranged between $600,000 and $1,000,000 since early 2022. In the year to July 2023 yearly turnover was estimated at $9,700,000 across the Wagga LGA area (AIRDNA).

 

 

Effects of short stay accommodation on rental market

 

The short stay property accommodation stock across Wagga Wagga LGA accounts for only 1% of total household stock and 3.3% of total private rental stock. This is much lower than the 5-10% estimated share of short stay accommodation in total housing stock in Byron Bay and other coastal areas, and in other Metropolitan areas.

 

The % of properties available for more than half of the year is just 0.5% of total household stock across the LGA (150 properties). If all properties were to convert to owner occupied and then rented out it would only close the current supply gap by around 1 year. The contribution to the rise in rents and drop in affordability seen across Wagga Wagga from the short stay market is also likely to be marginal. Distortions to the Rental market from short stay accommodation, and its contribution to housing shortages do exist, but are limited in the regional city context compared to coastal and Metropolitan areas.

 

Future likely trends

 

Going forward pressure on rental prices and affordability could escalate once more as rising landlord costs (driven mostly by increasing mortgage debt repayments, insurance costs, rate increases and other cost of living pressures) are passed on to renters in a continuing tight supply market alongside robust population growth. The contribution to affordability pressures from short stay accommodation is therefore likely to remain small compared to other factors pressurising the market.

 

The supply-demand rental market mismatch can only be fully solved going forward by either slowing population growth (Federal or State policy) and/or by rapidly increasing the supply. The recent Federal Government announcement to build 1.2 million new homes over the next five years will be challenging given already high construction rates, already high construction employment, materials shortages and a focus on improved quality builds. From a state perspective, recent budget announcements also recommitted to ramping up building of private and public housing and strengthening the build to rent market, however it is unclear much budget and new housing will be allocated to the Wagga Wagga LGA area.

 

 

Policy options / strategies

At a Federal and State level several policy interventions have been discussed aimed at increasing the supply of housing given the likely large increases in population expected in the coming years driven by the high levels of inward migration proposed by the Federal Government. Alongside the ambitious residential Federal building incentive scheme, other policy options could be explored further including rental caps, taxation of empty properties and incentive schemes to boost rent-a-room renting.   

 

From a Council perspective further lobbying of the State Government and other housing providers to fund and speed up the public housing building program could be continued. Better planning analysis and an action plan for the future housing needs within the Wagga Wagga LGA will be identified in the Wagga Wagga Housing Strategy which is currently under development.

 

Specifically, regarding the short stay accommodation market, it is likely that any interventions will have minimal effect on the housing supply in the short term and could risk the development of some unintended consequences into other key LGA services. Some options though include:

(a)     Option A – introduce a Wagga Wagga LGA rates surcharge (Brisbane 65% rate surcharge, Hobart 100%).

(b)     Option B – introduce a Wagga Wagga LGA short stay registration fee (Mornington $335, Warrnambool $400). A fee of $1000 would raise around $250,000 but costs for enforcement and collection would need to be netted out.

(c)     Option C – Federal/State cap on listing time to <90 days (already 180-day cap in some areas of NSW but little evidence of enforcement)

(d)     Option D – Federal/State Levy or Bed Tax ($5 per night has been proposed across the board for all accommodation types with funds reinvested in community infrastructure). Victoria has already introduced a short stay levy and the NSW Government is actively exploring a similar scheme.

(e)     Option E – Improve renter rights and incentivise longer term renting contracts.

 

Some issues and unintended consequences to consider in Options A and B specific to Council control are:

 

(1)     State or Federal interventions (Bed tax or levy) might surpass the Council intervention.

(2)     Revenue raised is likely to be small around $0.1mn to $0.25mn and excludes costs of collection and enforcement (estimated to be at 0.5 FTE). If this revenue was dedicated to a housing fund it would contribute to only the building of 1 or 2 residential properties per year.

(3)     A levy is likely to be passed onto consumers via higher accommodation prices. If other Councils do not have higher charges or levies, this could place other LGA’s at a competitive advantage around pricing and marketing over Wagga based short term providers targeting the visitor economy.

(4)     Introduction of a Council fee or charge could push some short stay providers to sell their properties placing further pressure on accommodation for visitors at peak times. This could further limit Council’s ability to host large State tourism, sporting, cultural or conference events.

(5)     Loss of short stay accommodation supply in the Hospital precinct and other neighbouring precincts could create accommodation problems for “medical tourists” who stay in those areas whilst supporting in-patients who reside outside of the LGA and need to stay overnight and close by.    

 

Further evaluation of the supply/demand mismatch and accommodation needs of the Local Government Area will be detailed in the forthcoming Affordable Housing Report.

 

Council administered affordable housing trust

 

Part B of the 30 January 2023 Council resolution requested consideration of the establishment of a Council affordable housing trust.

 

Council’s current Long Term Financial Plan has significant budget deficits estimated for the next three financial years at over $5.7M deficit.  These estimated deficits will be addressed during the annual budget revision process.  However, Council’s current financial position, along with other items Council is considering funding in future budgets, and the above estimated lack of a substantial income stream to be generated from a locally enforced levy, would not allow for the establishment of a Council administered affordable housing trust at this stage. 

 

 


 

Appendix A – Short stay data by LGA (Source AIRDNA):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Financial Implications

If Council were to introduce a Wagga Wagga LGA short stay registration fee, the revenue raised is likely to be small around $100K to $250K (excluding the cost of collection and enforcement which is estimated to be at 0.5 FTE.

 

Council’s current Long Term Financial Plan has significant budget deficits estimated for the next three financial years at over $5.7M deficit.  These estimated deficits will be addressed during the annual budget revision process.  However, Council’s current financial position, along with other items Council is considering funding in future budgets, and the above estimated lack of a substantial income stream that would be generated from a locally enforced levy, would not allow for the establishment of a Council administered affordable housing trust. 

Policy and Legislation

Wagga Wagga Community Strategic Plan 2040

 

Link to Strategic Plan

Growing Economy

Objective: Wagga Wagga is an attractive tourist destination

Accommodate and provide support to visitors

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

N/A

Internal / External Consultation

Internal consultation was undertaken with the Regional Activation and Finance directorates.

 

A Councillor workshop was held 25 September 2023 on the topic of Short Stay Accommodation.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 23 October 2023

RP-6

 

RP-6               196 BOOROOMA STREET - DEDICATION OF COMMUNITY LAND AS PUBLIC ROAD

Author:          Matthew Dombrovski 

Executive:    John Sidgwick

         

 

Summary:

Council has received a request from the landowner at 196 Boorooma Street, Boorooma, seeking that Council dedicate a small portion of community land for road widening purposes at Trumper Street, Boorooma to facilitate development of adjoining land.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a       endorse proceeding with the proposed dedication of Lot 8 DP 1187493 for road widening purposes pursuant to section 47F of the Local Government Act 1993 and section 10 of the Road Act 1993 as outlined in this report

b       authorise the General Manager or their delegate to sign all documents required to give effect to the resolution

c        authorise the General Manager or their delegate to take such further steps as necessary to complete the proposed dedication of land for road widening purposes including publishing a gazettal notice in the NSW Government Gazette

d       authorise the affixing of Council’s common seal to all documents relating to this matter as required

 

Report

Council is in receipt of a request from the registered proprietor of 196 Boorooma Street, Melissa Jayne Peet, seeking the dedication of a parcel of Council owned community land directly adjacent to her property for road widening purposes.

 

Background

 

Council is the owner of Lot 8 DP 1187493, which was created as part of a plan of subdivision registered on 3 September 2013.

 

The land in question is best described as a vengeance strip and is located along the entire eastern boundary of 196 Boorooma Street, Boorooma, owned by Melissa Jayne Peet. The vengeance strip was created as part of the development of land on the eastern side of Trumper Street, and the existence of this strip of land means that the parcel of land only has street access via Boorooma Street and prevents any access onto Trumper Street, thus restricting the ability of the land to be subdivided.

 

When created as part of Development Consent DA10/0344, the parcel of land was dedicated to Council in accordance with Condition of Consent 26 of the consent. As the property was dedicated under the registered plan of subdivision as public reserve, it was classified as community land on its transfer to Council.

 

Figure 1 below shows the location of the vengeance strip, with 196 Boorooma Street located on the western side.

 

Current Enquiry

 

Council received an initial inquiry from MJM on behalf of Melissa Peet, advising that she wished to progress with a subdivision of her property at 196 Boorooma Street, which is currently not able to proceed due to the lack of frontage onto Trumper Street. In particular, MJM asked Council to consider whether it would utilise its powers pursuant to section 32 of the Local Government Act 1993 to reclassify the vengeance strip as operational land on the basis that the land was originally dedicated to Council in accordance with a condition imposed under section 94 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.

 

Figure 1: Aerial map of site, with vengeance strip highlighted in red

 

After a review of this request and the historical records held by Council, Council staff were unable to find any evidence to support the proposition that the land was dedicated to Council in accordance with a condition imposed pursuant to section 94, and therefore advised MJM that this request was unable to be supported. Council advised its preferred approach would be for Melissa Peet to lodge a planning proposal for the reclassification of the land, on the basis that it could then be sold. Ms Peet indicated she was not prepared to proceed on this basis.

 


 

Council subsequently received a request from MJM to consider whether Council would be prepared to dedicate the community land as public road, pursuant to section 47F of the Local Government Act 1993. Section 47(2)(a) confirms that the prohibition on dedication of community land as public road does not apply to “a dedication of land for the purpose of widening an existing public road”.

 

On review of this enquiry, Council staff took the view that this was a viable alternative to the original proposal. MJM were advised that Council would be prepared to consider this approach, but noted the following:

1.   The approach would be subject to a formal report for consideration by Council;

2.   A Development Application could not be lodged, until the road widening was endorsed by Council and the community land was formally dedicated by way of publication of a gazettal notice;

3.   Any proposed subdivision of the land would include, as a condition of consent prior to the issue of a subdivision certificate, a requirement to construct any road required to meet the obligations of section 47F of the Local Government Act 1993 within the vengeance strip and adjoining land.

 

Council’s Operations teams have provided a high-level estimate of the costs of the road construction, being $198,000.

 

If the approach outlined above is endorsed by Council, the next steps would be to publish a gazettal notice in the NSW Government Gazette pursuant to section 10 of the Roads Act 1993. On publication of the gazettal notice, the vengeance strip will be formally dedicated as a road parcel.

 

Financial Implications

N/A

Policy and Legislation

Local Government Act 1993

Roads Act 1993

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979

 

Link to Strategic Plan

The Environment

Objective: Our built environment is functional, attractive and health promoting

Improve the facilities of our spaces and places

 

Risk Management Issues for Council

The primary risk to Council would be the cost of constructing the road to satisfy section 47F of the Local Government Act 1993 falling back to Council. This road construction is currently unplanned and unfunded, on the basis that the impacted adjoining lands are privately owned. The proposed approach of conditioning the development consent so as to require the landowner to construct the road as part of the development alleviates the risk to Council.

 

There is a risk that this approach may lead to Council receiving additional requests for consideration of road widening applications to address developer concerns rather than progressing through the more appropriate planning proposal process. However, it is considered that this matter provides a unique set of circumstances that are unlikely to be repeated, and therefore the risk is relatively minor.

Internal / External Consultation

Internal consultation has been conducted within the Regional Activation, Planning and Operations directorates of Council.

 

 

 

 


Report submitted to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on Monday 23 October 2023

RP-7

 

RP-7               FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE REPORT AS AT 30 SEPTEMBER 2023

Author:                        Carolyn Rodney 

         

 

Summary:

This report is for Council to consider information presented on the 2023/24 budget and Long-Term Financial Plan, and details Council’s external investments and performance as at 30 September 2023.

 

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a       approve the proposed 2023/24 budget variations for the month ended 30 September 2023 and note the balanced budget position as presented in this report

b       approve the proposed budget variations to the 2023/24 Long Term Financial Plan Capital Works Program including new projects and timing adjustments

c        note the Responsible Accounting Officer’s reports, in accordance with the Local Government (General) Regulation 2021 (Part 9 Division 3: Clause 203) that the financial position of Council is satisfactory having regard to the original estimates of income and expenditure and the recommendations made above

d       note the details of the external investments as of 30 September 2023 in accordance with section 625 of the Local Government Act 1993

 

Report

Wagga Wagga City Council (Council) forecasts a balanced budget position as of 30 September 2023.

 

Proposed budget variations including adjustments to the capital works program are detailed in this report for Council’s consideration and adoption.

 

Council has experienced a positive monthly investment performance for the month of September when compared to budget ($232,181 up on the monthly budget). This is mainly due to better than budgeted returns on Council’s investment portfolio as a result of the ongoing movement in the interest rate environment, as well as a higher than anticipated investment portfolio balance.

 

 


 

Key Performance Indicators

 

 

 

OPERATING INCOME

Total operating income is 24% of approved budget and is on track for the month of September 2023. An adjustment has been made to reflect the levy of rates that occurred at the start of the financial year. Excluding this adjustment, operating income received is 66% when compared to budget.

 

OPERATING EXPENSES

Total operating expenditure is 31% of approved budget, which is tracking over budget at this stage of the financial year, this is due to the payment of annual one-off expenses such as rates and insurance.

 

CAPITAL INCOME

Total capital income is 18% of approved budget. It is important to note that the actual income from capital is influenced by the timing of the receipt of capital grants and contributions in relation to expenditure incurred on the projects.

 

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Total capital expenditure including commitments is 18% of approved budget including pending projects.  Excluding commitments, the total expenditure is 6% when compared to the approved budget.

 

WAGGA WAGGA CITY COUNCIL
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE
1 JULY 2023 TO 30 SEPTEMBER 2023

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT

 

ORIGINAL
BUDGET
2023/24

BUDGET ADJ
2023/24

APPROVED BUDGET
2023/24

YTD ACTUAL   EXCL COMMT'S 2023/24

COMMT'S 2023/24

YTD ACTUAL + COMMT'S
2023/24

YTD % OF BUD

Revenue

 

Rates & Annual Charges

(79,700,947)

0

(79,700,947)

(19,500,628)

0

(19,500,628)

24%

User Charges & Fees

(32,607,964)

7,180

(32,600,784)

(6,824,042)

0

(6,824,042)

21%

Other Revenues

(3,040,358)

0

(3,040,358)

(2,269,151)

0

(2,269,151)

75%

Grants & Contributions provided for Operating Purposes

(13,891,687)

(3,067,068)

(16,958,755)

(2,342,225)

0

(2,342,225)

14%

Grants & Contributions provided for Capital Purposes

(43,630,578)

(28,424,049)

(72,054,627)

(13,074,750)

0

(13,074,750)

18%

Interest & Investment Revenue

(4,873,916)

0

(4,873,916)

(2,104,515)

0

(2,104,515)

43%

Other Income

(1,564,445)

(22,667)

(1,587,112)

(598,816)

0

(598,816)

38%

Total Revenue

(179,309,895)

(31,506,604)

(210,816,499)

(46,714,127)

0

(46,714,127)

22%

 

Expenses

Employee Benefits & On-Costs

56,172,711

0

56,172,711

13,240,405

0

13,240,405

24%

Borrowing Costs

3,363,314

0

3,363,314

1,203,609

0

1,203,609

36%

Materials & Services

41,316,274

11,635,688

52,951,962

12,304,971

9,883,707

22,188,677

42%

Depreciation & Amortisation

44,291,577

0

44,291,577

11,072,894

0

11,072,894

25%

Other Expenses

1,954,429

35,245

1,989,674

728,061

46,534

774,595

39%

Total Expenses

147,098,304

11,670,933

158,769,237

38,549,939

9,930,241

48,480,179

31%

 

Net Operating (Profit)/Loss

(32,211,591)

(19,835,671)

(52,047,262)

(8,164,188)

9,930,241

1,766,053

 

Net Operating Result Before Capital (Profit)/Loss

11,418,987

8,588,378

20,007,366

4,910,561

9,930,241

14,840,802

 

Cap/Reserve Movements

Capital Expenditure - One Off Confirmed

33,539,246

45,320,874

78,860,120

5,019,432

15,392,686

20,412,118

26%

Capital Expenditure - Recurrent

21,649,500

10,362,526

32,012,027

3,316,719

3,594,083

6,910,801

22%

Capital Expenditure - Pending Projects

38,732,266

2,776,592

41,508,858

84,125

73,650

157,775

0%

Loan Repayments

7,523,436

0

7,523,436

1,630,859

0

1,630,859

22%

New Loan Borrowings

(10,609,635)

(972,614)

(11,582,248)

0

0

0

0%

Sale of Assets

(1,490,575)

(2,317,180)

(3,807,755)

(356,356)

0

(356,356)

9%

Net Movements Reserves

(12,841,071)

(35,334,529)

(48,175,599)

0

0

0

0%

Total Cap/Res Movements

76,503,167

19,835,671

96,338,838

9,694,779

19,060,419

28,755,198

 

Net Result after Depreciation

44,291,577

0

44,291,577

1,530,591

28,990,660

30,521,250

 

 

Add back Depreciation Expense

44,291,577

0

44,291,577

11,072,894

0

11,072,894

25%

 

Cash Budget (Surplus)/Deficit

0

0

0

(9,542,303)

28,990,660

19,448,356

 


 

Years 2-10 Long Term Financial Plan (Surplus) /Deficit

 

Description

Budget

2024/25

Budget

2025/26

Budget

2026/27

Budget

2027/28

Budget

2028/29

Budget

2029/30

Budget

2030/31

Budget

2031/32

Budget

2032/33

Adopted Bottom Line (Surplus) / Deficit

706,102

2,769,193

2,225,767

0

0

0

0

0

(953,513)

Adopted Bottom Line Adjustments

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Revised Bottom Line (Surplus) / Deficit

706,102

2,769,193

2,225,767

0

0

0

0

0

(953,513)

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




2023/24 Revised Budget Result – (Surplus) / Deficit

$’000s

Original 2023/24 Budget Result as adopted by Council

Total Budget Variations approved to date.

Budget Variations for September 2023

$0K

$0K

$0K

Proposed Revised Budget result for 30 September 2023 - (Surplus) / Deficit

$0K

 

 

The proposed Operating and Capital Budget Variations for 30 September 2023 which affect the current 2023/24 financial year are listed below.

 

Budget Variation

Amount

Funding Source

Net Impact

(Fav)/ Unfav

5 – The Environment

 

Glass Gallery Lift Control Upgrade

$70K

 Buildings Reserve ($70K)

Nil

Funds are required for the urgent upgrade of the Glass Gallery Lift Controls. The upgrade is required due to the lift failing and being out of use until the upgrade is completed. It is proposed to fund the variation from the Buildings Reserve.

Estimated Completion: 30 June 2024

Job Consolidation: 22613

 

Narrung & Billagha Street Upgrade

$250K

 Sewer Reserve ($250K)

Nil

Roadworks have commenced on the renewal of the Narrung and Billagha Street pavements and it has been found that the existing pavement is very thin and not suitable for rehabilitating. A new 150mm thick base course is required to complete the roadworks to a suitable standard. The Narrung Sewer Treatment Plant is a major contributor of heavy vehicles and traffic that use this road. It is therefore proposed to fund the additional funds from the Sewer Reserve.

This will bring the total project budget to $616,239, (funded from $250,000 Sewer Reserve, $127,539 Local Roads Repair Program & $238,700 Local Roads and Community Infrastructure Program Round 4.

Estimated Completion: 30 June 2024

Job Consolidation: 22505

 

Lord Baden Powell Drive Redevelopment

$130K

 Stormwater Reserve ($130K)

Nil

Installation of additional stormwater along the northern kerb of Kurrajong disability services was required to efficiently discharge to the existing stormwater system. This works required closure of existing access to Kurrajong and provision of temporary access. In addition, minor reshaping of existing stormwater detention basin was required as part of stormwater management. The second pedestrian crossing (near Kurrajong) which includes line marking, centre islands and lighting are confirmed as variation since it provides good connection from Botanic gardens and cost effective to build as part this contract. Unsuitable material discovered at subgrade level were required to remove to form solid foundation for pavement. The additional work and unforeseen requirements warranted additional time and budget required to complete the project.

This required budget variation will bring the total project budget to $2,798K.

Estimated Completion: 31 December 2023

Job Consolidation: 19736

 

 

2023/24 Capital Works Summary

 

Capital Works

Approved Budget

Proposed Movement

Proposed Budget

One-off

$78,860,120

$450,000

$79,310,120

Recurrent

$32,012,027

$0

$32,012,027

Pending

$41,508,858

$0

$41,508,858

Total Capital Works

$152,381,005

$450,000

$152,831,005

 

 

 

 


 

Current Restrictions

 

 

RESERVES SUMMARY

30 SEPTEMBER 2023

 

CLOSING BALANCE 2022/23

ADOPTED RESERVE TRANSFERS 2023/24

BUDGET VARIATIONS APPROVED UP TO COUNCIL MEETING 18.9.2023

PROPOSED CHANGES for Council Resolution*

BALANCE AS AT 30 SEPTEMBER 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

Externally Restricted

 

 

 

 

 

Developer Contributions - Section 7.11

(33,518,693)

5,650,317

4,550,043

 

(23,318,333)

Developer Contributions - Section 7.12

(427,766)

(28,137)

0

 

(455,903)

Developer Contributions - Stormwater Section 64

(7,952,971)

461,121

392,363

 

(7,099,487)

Sewer Fund

(45,473,006)

(486,810)

3,649,413

250,000

(42,060,402)

Solid Waste

(28,001,560)

1,115,349

8,217,416

 

(18,668,794)

Specific Purpose Unexpended Grants & Contributions

(13,419,243)

0

13,419,243

 

0

SRV Levee Reserve

(6,316,594)

0

46,718

 

(6,269,877)

Stormwater Levy

(5,350,848)

3,299,121

832,248

130,000

(1,089,479)

Total Externally Restricted

(140,460,680)

10,010,962

31,107,444

380,000

(98,962,274)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Internally Restricted

 

 

Additional Special Variation (ASV)

(630,214)

(304,627)

0

 

(934,841)

Airport

0

0

0

 

0

Art Gallery

(3,804)

0

0

 

(3,804)

Bridge Replacement

(277,544)

0

40,739

 

(236,805)

Buildings

(1,816,155)

222,330

158,168

70,000

(1,365,657)

CCTV

(47,471)

12,476

0

 

(34,995)

Cemetery

(1,246,587)

(240,585)

30,437

 

(1,456,735)

Civic Theatre

(127)

0

0

 

(127)

Civil Infrastructure

(8,750,164)

1,975,590

202,918

 

(6,571,656)

Council Election

(305,964)

(117,566)

0

 

(423,531)

Economic Development

(407,131)

0

388,773

 

(18,358)

Emergency Events Reserve

(245,427)

(91,807)

50,000

 

(287,235)

Employee Leave Entitlements Gen Fund

(3,604,926)

0

0

 

(3,604,926)

Environmental Conservation

(116,578)

0

0

 

(116,578)

Event Attraction

(969,436)

0

198,755

 

(794,392)

Financial Assistance Grants in Advance

(12,361,442)

0

0

 

(12,361,442)

Grant Co-Funding

(500,000)

0

0

 

(500,000)

Gravel Pit Restoration

(807,726)

13,333

0

 

(794,392)

Information Services

(2,419,649)

906,761

92,772

 

(1,420,116)

Insurance Variations

(50,000)

0

0

 

(50,000)

Internal Loans

(6,215,667)

(768,775)

1,004,695

 

(5,979,747)

Lake Albert Improvements

(127,751)

38,377

0

 

(89,374)

Library

(166,718)

(155,915)

0

 

(322,633)

Livestock Marketing Centre

(6,581,531)

1,077,258

2,337,085

 

(3,167,188)

Museum Acquisitions

(54,612)

10,000

0

 

(44,612)

 


 

 

 

CLOSING BALANCE 2022/23

ADOPTED RESERVE TRANSFERS 2023/24

BUDGET VARIATIONS APPROVED UP TO COUNCIL MEETING 18.9.2023

PROPOSED CHANGES for Council Resolution*

BALANCE AS AT 30 SEPTEMBER 2023

Net Zero Emissions

(309,016)

(44,492)

226,196

 

(127,313)

Oasis Reserve

(1,324,304)

172,650

594,953

 

(556,701)

Parks & Recreation Projects

(1,061,367)

(137,862)

203,495

 

(995,735)

Parks Water

(180,000)

(150,000)

0

 

(330,000)

Planning Legals

(100,000)

(20,000)

0

 

(120,000)

Plant Replacement

(4,023,265)

128,993

2,353,001

 

(1,541,272)

Project Carryovers

(6,990,324)

0

6,990,324

 

0

Public Art

(238,510)

30,000

159,177

 

(49,332)

Service Reviews

(100,000)

0

0

 

(100,000)

Sister Cities

(30,590)

0

0

 

(30,590)

Stormwater Drainage

(110,178)

0

0

 

(110,178)

Strategic Real Property

(1,723,844)

0

(1,787,417)

 

(3,511,261)

Subdivision Tree Planting

(348,173)

20,000

0

 

(328,173)

Unexpended External Loans

(1,870,017)

136,612

1,650,416

 

(82,989)

Workers Compensation

(194,670)

25,000

9,520

 

(160,149)

Total Internally Restricted

(66,310,882)

2,737,751

14,904,007

70,000

(48,599,124)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Restricted

(206,771,562)

12,748,713

46,011,451

450,000

(147,561,398)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Unrestricted

(11,502,000)

0

0

0

(11,502,000)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Cash, Cash Equivalents, and Investments

(218,273,562)

12,748,713

46,011,451

450,000

(159,063,398)

 

 

 

 


Investment Summary as at 30 September 2023

In accordance with Regulation 212 of the Local Government (General) Regulation 2021, details of Wagga Wagga City Council’s external investments are outlined below.

Institution

Rating

Closing Balance
Invested
31/08/2023
$

Closing Balance
Invested
30/09/2023
$

September
EOM
Current Yield
%

September
EOM
% of Portfolio

Investment
Date

Maturity
Date

Term
(mths)

At Call Accounts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAB

AA-

2,460,171

351,895

4.10%

0.16%

N/A

N/A

N/A

CBA

AA-

10,710,195

6,001,242

4.10%

2.65%

N/A

N/A

N/A

CBA

AA-

24,448,671

24,534,844

4.15%

10.83%

N/A

N/A

N/A

Macquarie Bank

A+

9,382,655

9,412,682

3.90%

4.15%

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total At Call Accounts

 

47,001,692

40,300,663

4.08%

17.78%

 

 

 

Short Term Deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AMP

BBB

1,000,000

1,000,000

4.70%

0.44%

15/11/2022

15/11/2023

12

AMP

BBB

2,000,000

2,000,000

4.55%

0.88%

30/11/2022

30/11/2023

12

CBA

AA-

1,000,000

1,000,000

4.69%

0.44%

30/01/2023

30/01/2024

12

Australian Military Bank

BBB+

1,000,000

1,000,000

5.06%

0.44%

24/05/2023

24/05/2024

12

Australian Unity

BBB+

1,000,000

1,000,000

5.44%

0.44%

8/06/2023

11/06/2024

12

ING Bank

A

2,000,000

2,000,000

5.62%

0.88%

26/06/2023

26/06/2024

12

ING Bank

A

2,000,000

2,000,000

5.65%

0.88%

30/06/2023

28/06/2024

12

Heritage and People's Choice

BBB+

1,000,000

1,000,000

5.80%

0.44%

10/07/2023

10/07/2024

12

CBA

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

5.27%

0.88%

31/08/2023

30/08/2024

12

Total Short Term Deposits

 

13,000,000

13,000,000

5.22%

5.74%

 

 

 

Medium Term Deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOQ

BBB+

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.20%

0.88%

4/01/2022

4/01/2024

24

BOQ

BBB+

1,000,000

1,000,000

3.78%

0.44%

1/06/2022

3/06/2024

24

Westpac

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.32%

0.88%

28/06/2021

29/06/2026

60

Westpac

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.80%

0.88%

15/11/2021

17/11/2025

48

ICBC

A

2,000,000

2,000,000

2.03%

0.88%

6/11/2019

6/11/2024

60

ICBC

A

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.83%

0.88%

28/11/2019

28/11/2024

60

Judo Bank

BBB-

1,000,000

1,000,000

1.30%

0.44%

3/12/2021

4/12/2023

24

ICBC

A

1,000,000

1,000,000

1.75%

0.44%

6/01/2020

8/01/2024

48

BOQ

BBB+

1,000,000

1,000,000

2.00%

0.44%

28/02/2020

28/02/2025

60

Police Credit Union

NR

1,000,000

1,000,000

2.20%

0.44%

1/04/2020

1/04/2025

60

ICBC

A

1,000,000

1,000,000

1.85%

0.44%

29/05/2020

29/05/2025

60

ICBC

A

1,000,000

1,000,000

1.86%

0.44%

1/06/2020

2/06/2025

60

ICBC

A

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.75%

0.88%

25/06/2020

25/06/2025

60

ICBC

A

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.75%

0.88%

25/06/2020

25/06/2025

60

ICBC

A

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.60%

0.88%

29/06/2020

28/06/2024

48

ICBC

A

3,000,000

3,000,000

5.07%

1.32%

30/06/2022

30/06/2027

60

ICBC

A

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.42%

0.88%

7/07/2020

8/07/2024

48

ICBC

A

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.50%

0.88%

17/08/2020

18/08/2025

60

BoQ

BBB+

1,000,000

1,000,000

1.25%

0.44%

7/09/2020

8/09/2025

60

BoQ

BBB+

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.25%

0.88%

14/09/2020

15/09/2025

60

NAB

AA-

1,000,000

1,000,000

5.23%

0.44%

14/09/2023

16/09/2024

12

AMP

BBB

1,000,000

1,000,000

3.30%

0.44%

25/05/2022

27/11/2023

18

ICBC

A

1,000,000

1,000,000

1.20%

0.44%

7/12/2020

8/12/2025

60

NAB

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

0.95%

0.88%

29/01/2021

29/01/2026

60

NAB

AA-

1,000,000

1,000,000

1.08%

0.44%

22/02/2021

20/02/2026

60

NAB

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.25%

0.88%

3/03/2021

2/03/2026

60

NAB

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.40%

0.88%

21/06/2021

19/06/2026

60

Westpac

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.32%

0.88%

25/06/2021

25/06/2026

60

ICBC

A

1,000,000

1,000,000

1.32%

0.44%

25/08/2021

25/08/2026

60

AMP

BBB

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.00%

0.88%

18/10/2021

17/10/2024

36

Westpac

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

1.56%

0.88%

30/11/2021

29/11/2024

36

Westpac

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

2.00%

0.88%

8/02/2022

10/02/2025

36

P&N Bank

BBB

2,000,000

2,000,000

2.40%

0.88%

9/03/2022

10/03/2025

36

P&N Bank

BBB

2,000,000

2,000,000

2.00%

0.88%

10/03/2022

11/03/2024

24

MyState

BBB

2,000,000

2,000,000

2.20%

0.88%

2/03/2022

3/03/2025

36

CBA

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

3.28%

0.88%

26/04/2022

26/04/2024

24

CBA

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

3.78%

0.88%

4/05/2022

6/05/2024

24

CBA

AA-

2,000,000

2,000,000

3.99%

0.88%

4/05/2022

5/05/2025

36

ING Bank

A

1,000,000

1,000,000

3.76%

0.44%

23/05/2022

23/05/2024

24

ICBC

A

2,000,000

2,000,000

3.95%

0.88%

6/06/2022

6/06/2024

24

Australian Unity

BBB+

2,000,000

2,000,000

4.15%

0.88%

8/06/2022

11/06/2024

24

Suncorp

A+

2,000,000

2,000,000

4.40%

0.88%

22/06/2022

14/12/2023

18

MyState

BBB

2,000,000

2,000,000

4.45%

0.88%

29/06/2022

28/06/2024

24

BoQ

BBB+

1,000,000

1,000,000

4.50%

0.44%

7/07/2022

7/07/2025

36

CBA

AA-

1,000,000

1,000,000

4.25%

0.44%

12/08/2022

12/08/2025

36

P&N Bank

BBB

3,000,000

3,000,000

4.55%

1.32%

29/08/2022

29/08/2025

36

Australian Military Bank

BBB+

2,000,000

2,000,000

4.55%

0.88%

2/09/2022

2/09/2025

36

P&N Bank

BBB

1,000,000

1,000,000

4.40%

0.44%

9/09/2022

9/09/2025

36

BoQ

BBB+

1,000,000

1,000,000

4.70%

0.44%

4/10/2022

4/10/2024

24

AMP

BBB

2,000,000

2,000,000

4.95%

0.88%

21/10/2022

21/10/2024

24

ICBC

A

2,000,000

2,000,000

5.20%

0.88%

21/10/2022

21/10/2025

36

AMP

BBB

1,000,000

1,000,000

4.75%

0.44%

15/11/2022

14/11/2024

24

AMP

BBB

1,000,000

1,000,000

4.80%

0.44%

21/11/2022

20/11/2025

36

P&N Bank

BBB

2,000,000

2,000,000

4.75%

0.88%

16/12/2022

16/12/2024

24

Police Credit Union

NR

2,000,000

2,000,000

5.04%

0.88%

15/02/2023

17/02/2025

24

Police Credit Union

NR

2,000,000

2,000,000

4.94%

0.88%

14/03/2023

14/03/2025

24

P&N Bank

BBB

2,000,000

2,000,000

5.00%

0.88%

14/03/2023

15/03/2027

48

Hume Bank

BBB+

2,000,000

2,000,000

4.75%

0.88%

31/03/2023

31/03/2025

24

Auswide

BBB

2,000,000

2,000,000

4.95%

0.88%

13/04/2023

13/04/2026

36

P&N Bank

BBB

2,000,000

2,000,000

5.20%

0.88%

20/04/2023

20/04/2027

48

P&N Bank

BBB

1,000,000

1,000,000

5.20%

0.44%

26/05/2023

26/05/2026

36

ING Bank

A

2,000,000

2,000,000

5.37%

0.88%

21/08/2023

21/08/2025

24

Total Medium Term Deposits

 

105,000,000

105,000,000

3.10%

46.33%

 

 

 

Floating Rate Notes - Senior Debt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Westpac

AA-

2,514,833

2,523,804

BBSW + 88

1.11%

16/05/2019

16/08/2024

63

Suncorp

A+

1,256,985

1,261,789

BBSW + 78

0.56%

30/07/2019

30/07/2024

60

ANZ

AA-

2,006,350

2,013,541

BBSW + 77

0.89%

29/08/2019

29/08/2024

60

HSBC

AA-

2,528,977

2,506,772

BBSW + 83

1.11%

27/09/2019

27/09/2024

60

ANZ

AA-

1,514,261

1,519,597

BBSW + 76

0.67%

16/01/2020

16/01/2025

60

NAB

AA-

2,018,520

2,025,773

BBSW + 77

0.89%

21/01/2020

21/01/2025

60

Newcastle Permanent

BBB

1,103,280

1,108,191

BBSW + 112

0.49%

4/02/2020

4/02/2025

60

Macquarie Bank

A+

2,009,317

2,017,014

BBSW + 84

0.89%

12/02/2020

12/02/2025

60

BOQ Covered

AAA

553,805

555,941

BBSW + 107

0.25%

14/05/2020

14/05/2025

60

UBS

A+

1,504,181

1,510,063

BBSW + 87

0.67%

30/07/2020

30/07/2025

60

Bank of China Australia

A

1,506,947

1,512,966

BBSW + 78

0.67%

27/10/2020

27/10/2023

36

CBA

AA-

2,008,413

2,014,881

BBSW + 70

0.89%

14/01/2022

14/01/2027

60

Rabobank

A+

2,000,088

2,007,516

BBSW + 73

0.89%

27/01/2022

27/01/2027

60

Newcastle Permanent

BBB

984,930

989,528

BBSW + 100

0.44%

10/02/2022

10/02/2027

60

NAB

AA-

2,397,144

2,403,865

BBSW + 72

1.06%

25/02/2022

25/02/2027

60

Bendigo-Adelaide

BBB+

1,669,619

1,654,389

BBSW + 98

0.73%

17/03/2022

17/03/2025

36

ANZ

AA-

2,015,529

2,022,024

BBSW + 97

0.89%

12/05/2022

12/05/2027

60

NAB

AA-

1,708,709

1,714,802

BBSW + 90

0.76%

30/05/2022

30/05/2025

36

Suncorp

A+

903,526

907,028

BBSW + 93

0.40%

22/08/2022

22/08/2025

36

ANZ

AA-

2,543,875

2,551,859

BBSW + 120

1.13%

4/11/2022

4/11/2027

60

NAB

AA-

2,535,576

2,542,410

BBSW + 120

1.12%

25/11/2022

25/11/2027

60

Suncorp

A+

1,121,491

1,110,686

BBSW + 125

0.49%

14/12/2022

14/12/2027

60

CBA

AA-

2,037,457

2,043,183

BBSW + 115

0.90%

13/01/2023

13/01/2028

60

Bank Australia

BBB

1,911,870